Evangel University

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Abnormal Psychology – Simple Book Publishing

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Abnormal Psychology is adapted from a work produced and distributed under a Creative Commons license (CC BY) in 2014 by OpenStax. This adapted edition is produced by Delta College through the OER Support Initiative This adaptation comprises three chapters (Chapter 2 – Psychological Research, Chapter 14 – Stress, Lifestyle, and Health, Chapter 15 – Psychological Disorders) of the original text, chapters were reformatted to make the resulting product the starting point for an Abnormal Psychology course. This adaptation has not significantly altered or updated the original 2018 text.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Delta College Elearning Office, Susan Harvey

Art Appreciation

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This course is particularly focused on helping you develop visual literacy skills, but all the college courses you take are to some degree about information literacy. Visual literacy is really just a specialized type of information literacy. The skills you acquire in this course will help you become an effective researcher in other fields, as well.

Material Type: Full Course, Textbook

American Art

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This course surveys art of America from the colonial era through the post-war 20th century. The student will consider broad stylistic tendencies in various regions and periods and examine specific artists and works of art in historical and social contexts, with emphasis on the congruent evolution of contemporary American multi-cultural identity. Overarching issues that have interested major scholars of American art and its purview include the landscape (wilderness, Manifest Destiny, rural settlement, and urban development); the family and gender roles; the founding rhetoric of freedom and antebellum slavery; and notions of artistic modernism through the 20th century. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Understand the historical (geographic, political) formation of the present United States of America; Be familiar with renowned influential American artists from the 18th through the 20th century; Be conversant in common stylistic designations used in Western art of the 17th through 20th centuries; Recognize subjects and forms in American art through history that mark its distinction; Be able to engage specific images, objects, and structures from different critical perspectives to consider their functions and meanings. (Art History 210)

Material Type: Assessment, Full Course, Homework/Assignment, Lecture, Reading, Syllabus

Edo: Art in Japan, 1615Đ1868

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This program surveys two centuries of art and culture in the city now known as Tokyo. Ceramics, screens, textiles, prints, paintings, and armor are among the materials discussed.

Material Type: Diagram/Illustration, Reading, Teaching/Learning Strategy, Textbook

The Elements of Art

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The goal of this unit is to introduce students to the basic elements of art (color, line, shape, form, and texture) and to show students how artists use these elements in different ways in their work. In the unit, students will answer questions as they look carefully at paintings and sculpture to identify the elements and analyze how they are used by different artists.

Material Type: Diagram/Illustration, Lesson Plan, Unit of Study

Comparing Artists Published

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In this seminar you will be able to discuss Spanish artists using comparison phrases and o-->ue stem changing verbs.  Comparison phrases such as more than, less than, and as much as can be used in conjunction with previously learned adjectives.   In this seminar you will compare and contrast various Spanish-speaking artists and their influence in art.  ACTFL StandardsCommunication: Interpersonal CommunicationCultures: Relating Cultural Products to PerspectivesConnections: Making ConnectionsCommunities: Lifelong LearningLearning TargetI can discuss and make comparisons between different artists from Spanish-speaking countries.Habits of MindThinking flexiblyCritical Thinking SkillComparing

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Author: IU8 Author

The Creative Spark, Fall 2004

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Creative activity (isn't) the icing on the cake. Human creativity is the cake. (Jerry Hirschberg) Creativity - "The mastery of information and skills in the service of dreams" (Hirschberg) - is much prized in the arts, science, business and the classroom. What does the creative process look like? Under what conditions does it flourish - what ignites the creative spark? Attempting to answer these questions, this class explores ways creativity has been understood in Western culture: what we prize and fear about creativity and its wellsprings; how writers, artists, scientists and inventors have described their own creative processes; how psychologists and philosophers have theorized it; ways in which creativity has been represented in Western culture, particularly in 20th century films; and creativity in everyday life, including our own lives. Readings include portions of psychologist Rollo May's The Courage To Create, and essays by Joan Didion, John Updike, Alice Walker, Oliver Sacks, and others. In addition, we'll watch video profiles of choreographer Paul Taylor, architect Maya Lin, and jazz musician Dave Brubeck. We'll keep journals in which we note our own observations and reflections on creative process. We will also watch a film together as a class one evening early in the term.

Material Type: Full Course

Authors: Boiko, Karen

Modern Art

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In this course, you will study the various artistic movements that comprise 19th- and 20th-century modern art. You will examine several dozen artists, all of whom helped define their respective artistic styles and eras through their innovative approaches to representation, artistic space, and the role of the artist in society. Each unit will cover a significant period in the history of modern art and explore the ways in which both the principal figures from each period and the corresponding movements challenged the limits of art through the incorporation of modern life, as each artist addresses the political, philosophical, and personal implications of ĺÎĺ_ĺĚĄ_modernityĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺÎĺ and how it relates to the production of artwork.

Material Type: Full Course, Homework/Assignment, Lecture Notes, Reading, Syllabus

Music 101

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Welcome to Music 101.  I think you’ve made a smart choice to spend some weeks studying some of the greatest music ever written.  Consider for a moment how quickly a hit pop song passes from fashionable to forgotten.  Those of us that have been out of high school or college more years than we care to remember have certainly had the experience of hearing a favorite anthem of our youth and thinking, “Oh yeah, that song!  I’d forgotten that one.”  Think about that: the song was totally loved, then completely forgotten within a matter of just a few years.  Then consider that many of the composers that we will study have been dead for over two hundred years, and yet their music has never been forgotten and never stopped being performed and loved.  That, quite simply, is amazing.

Material Type: Full Course, Textbook

Music Appreciation

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This course is an exposition of the philosophy, principles, and materials of music from the Baroque Period to contemporary period with illustrative examples from the Baroque Period, Classical Period, Romantic Period, Contemporary Classical Music and Popular Music. The course is designed to give the student an appreciation of music by exposing them to many musical styles, composers, historical trends, as well as increasing their aural, verbal and writing skills in describing music.

Material Type: Full Course, Textbook

Open Music Theory

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Open Music Theory is an open-source, interactive, online “text”book for college-level music theory courses. This textbook is meant to support active student engagement with music in the theory classroom. That means that this text is meant to take a back seat to student music making (and breaking). It is not the center of the course. The three original authors use this textbook in the context of “inverted” or “flipped” courses, often following an inquiry-based model. As a result, most of the pages in this textbook do not read like a typical twentieth-century textbook. They are somewhere in between prosy lecture notes and reference material, with minimal graphical or audio examples. Also, unlike many resources for “flipped” classes, there are few resources in this textbook where the core information is presented in video. We made these decisions consciously, so that this would not simply be a multimedia, web-based version of an industrial-era textbook. Rather, we wanted to create a textbook that could serve as a quick reference in the context of active musical engagement.

Material Type: Full Course, Textbook

Authors: Brian Moseley, Bryn Hughes, Kris Shaffer

Music and the Child

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Children are inherently musical. They respond to music and learn through music. Music expresses children’s identity and heritage, teaches them to belong to a culture, and develops their cognitive well-being and inner self worth. As professional instructors, childcare workers, or students looking forward to a career working with children, we should continuously search for ways to tap into children’s natural reservoir of enthusiasm for singing, moving and experimenting with instruments. But how, you might ask? What music is appropriate for the children I’m working with? How can music help inspire a well-rounded child? How do I reach and teach children musically? Most importantly perhaps, how can I incorporate music into a curriculum that marginalizes the arts? This book explores a holistic, artistic, and integrated approach to understanding the developmental connections between music and children. This book guides professionals to work through music, harnessing the processes that underlie music learning, and outlining developmentally appropriate methods to understand the role of music in children’s lives through play, games, creativity, and movement. Additionally, the book explores ways of applying music-making to benefit the whole child, i.e., socially, emotionally, physically, cognitively, and linguistically.

Material Type: Textbook

Author: Natalie Sarrazin

Introduction to Music Composition, Spring 2014

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Through a progressive series of composition projects, students investigate the sonic organization of musical works and performances, focusing on fundamental questions of unity and variety. Aesthetic issues are considered in the pragmatic context of the instructions that composers provide to achieve a desired musical result, whether these instructions are notated in prose, as graphic images, or in symbolic notation. No formal training is required. Weekly listening, reading, and composition assignments draw on a broad range of musical styles and intellectual traditions, from various cultures and historical periods.

Material Type: Full Course

Author: Makan, Keeril

Psychology

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Psychology is designed to meet scope and sequence requirements for the single-semester introduction to psychology course. The book offers a comprehensive treatment of core concepts, grounded in both classic studies and current and emerging research. The text also includes coverage of the DSM-5 in examinations of psychological disorders. Psychology incorporates discussions that reflect the diversity within the discipline, as well as the diversity of cultures and communities across the globe.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Arlene Lacombe, Kathryn Dumper, Marilyn Lovett, Marion Perlmutter, Rose M. Spielman, William Jenkins

Discover Psychology 2.0 - A Brief Introductory Text

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This textbook presents core concepts common to introductory courses. The 15 units cover the traditional areas of intro-to-psychology; ranging from biological aspects of psychology to psychological disorders to social psychology. This book can be modified: feel free to add or remove modules to better suit your specific needs. This book includes a comprehensive instructor's manual, PowerPoint presentations, a test bank, reading anticipation guides, and adaptive student quizzes.

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Cara Laney, David M. Buss, David Watson, Edward Diener, Elizabeth F. Loftus, Emily Hooker, George Loewenstein, Henry L. Roediger III, Jeanne Tsai, Kathleen B. McDermott, Mark E. Bouton, Max H. Bazerman, Richard E. Lucas, Robert Siegler, Robert V. Levine, Ross Thompson, Sarah Pressman, Sudeep Bhatia, Susan T. Fiske, Yoshihisa Kashima