All resources in Cyber Citizenship Group

Washington Educational Technology Learning Standards

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In this update to the 2008 standards, Washington is adopting the 2016 Technology Standards for Students released by the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE). These standards were developed collaboratively with teachers, administrators, subject matter experts, state and national associations, and stakeholders in educational technology. Teams of Washington teachers, technology integration specialists, and teacher-librarians have reviewed these standards to ensure they effectively meet the needs of Washington students. These standards emphasize the ways technology can be used to amplify and transform learning and teaching, and they resonate with our state’s aspiration to empower connected learners in a connected world. In addition, they complement statewide efforts to enhance instruction in digital citizenship and media literacy, which are critical elements of preparing our students for careers, post-secondary aspirations, and beyond.

Material Type: Teaching/Learning Strategy

Author: Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Journalism, 'Fake News' and Disinformation: A Handbook for Journalism Education and Training

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This new publication by UNESCO is a timely resource and highly topical subject for all those who practice or teach journalism in this Digital Age. UNESCO's new handbook is an essential addition to teaching syllabi for all journalism educators, as well as practising journalists and editors who are interested in information, how we share it and how we use it. It is mission critical that those who practice journalism understand and report on the new threats to trusted information. Political parties, health professionals, business people, scientists, election monitors and others will also find the handbook useful in navigating the information disorder. Written by experts in the fight against disinformation, this handbook explores the very nature of journalism - with modules on why trust matters; thinking critically about how digital technology and social platforms are conduits of the information disorder; fighting back against disinformation and misinformation through media and information literacy; fact-checking 101; social media verification and combating online abuse. The seven individual modules are available online to download that enables readers to develop their own course relevant to their media environment. This handbook is also useful for the library and information science professionals, students, and LIS educators for understanding the different dimensions of fake news and disinformation. Table of Contents Module One | Truth, Trust and Journalism: Why it Matters | by Cherilyn Ireton Module Two | Thinking about "Information Disorder": Formats of Misinformation, Disinformation and Mal-Information | by Claire Wardle & Hossein Derakshan Module Three | News Industry Transformation: Digital Technology, Social Platforms and the Spread of Misinformation and Disinformation |by Julie Posetti Module Four | Combatting Disinformation and Misinformation Through Media and Information Literacy (MIL) | by Magda Abu-Fadil Module Five | Fact-Checking 101 | by Alexios Mantzarlis Module Six | Social Media Verification: Assessing Sources and Visual Content | by Tom Trewinnard and Fergus Bell Module Seven | Combatting Online Abuse: When Journalists and Their Sources are Targeted | by Julie Posetti Additional Resources: https://en.unesco.org/fightfakenews

Material Type: Full Course, Module, Textbook, Unit of Study

Authors: Alexios Mantzarlis, Cherilyn Ireton, Claire Wardle, Fergus Bell, Hossein Derakshan, Julie Posetti, Magda Abu-Fadil, Tom Trewinnard

Lesson Plan -- Fact or Fiction: Distinguish Reality Online

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In this 3½-hour workshop, learners assess the reliability and credibility of online resources. They explore how misinformation and fake news can distort our biases and perspectives, ultimately making it difficult for us to be objective in the selection of resources as aids to both effective learning and informed civic action and decision-making. Students will:  Define misinformation and fake news and how it can affect personal biases and perspectives.  Discover how to mitigate bias when searching for and surfing information online.  Use best practices to authenticate sources of credible and reliable information: o Find and verify the original source o Check other sources o Use fact-checking tools Suitable for Grades 11 and 12

Material Type: Lesson Plan, Teaching/Learning Strategy

Author: Lawrence White

Spotting Fake News

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Students jump into learning how to spot fake news by playing a round of Factitious, the game. Next, they meet in groups to share strategies that helped them while playing the game. (A sample infographic of strategies is included, too.) Third, groups of students work together to be the first team to find all four fake news items in The Canadian Infiltration Fake News Game. 

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Author: Melissa Pilakowski

Cybersecurity-Fake News

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The goals of this activity are to facilitate team work, critical thinking, and presentation skills in the area of cybersecurity and fake news. Students will be grouped into two teams. As a team, they will choose and analyze cases and ethical questions about fake news through the questions presented in the activity. They will present their analysis to the class.

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Author: Amy J Ramson

Fake News: Bias in the Media

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The media plays an important role in how you interpret current events. The news media can use particular wording to sway public opinion. This seminar will help you build necessary skills to analyze and understand the media you consume to help you make informed decisions.StandardsCC.8.5.9-10.F: Compare the point of view of two or more authors for how they treat the same or similar topics, including which details they include and emphasize in their respective accounts.CC.8.5.9-10.I Compare and contrast treatments of the same topic in several primary and secondary sources.CC.1.2.11-12.D Evaluate how an author’s point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.CC.1.2.11-12.F Evaluate how words and phrases shape meaning and tone in texts.

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Author: Tracy Rains

A Field Guide to “Fake News” and Other Information Disorders

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A Field Guide to “Fake News” and Other Information Disorders explores the use of digital methods to study false viral news, political memes, trolling practices and their social life online. It responds to an increasing demand for understanding the interplay between digital platforms, misleading information, propaganda and viral content practices, and their influence on politics and public life in democratic societies.

Material Type: Reading

Authors: Jonathan Gray, Liliana Bounegru, Michele Mauri, Public Data Lab, Tommaso Venturini

News Literacy

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The digital age has created the need for a new kind of literacy-a literacy that empowers news consumers to determine whether information is credible, reliable and truthful. This is not just a skill; it is a new core competency for the 21st century. So-called “fake news” is hard to spot and spreads easily, leading to disagreements over basic facts. The antidote to the growing challenges posed by this digital revolution is news literacy. This mini news literacy course includes two three-hour sessions that will teach anyone to become a more critical consumer of news.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Homework/Assignment

Author: Sissel W. McCarthy

The War of the Worlds, Fake News, and Media Literacy Primary Source Unit

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The following unit offers multiple entry points into developing an understanding of media literacy. The unit framework and primary sources can be integrated into classrooms of grades 4-12. Each lesson has student objectives that can be accomplished within 40 minute periods over the course of several weeks. A midpoint writing assessment, whole class capstone debate, and final independentwriting assessment are included. Support materials are integrated into the lessons, and the primary source document pages can be found at the end of the unit guide.

Material Type: Unit of Study

Author: The Rockefeller Archive Center

The War of the Worlds, Fake News, and Media Literacy Primary Source Unit

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The following unit offers multiple entry points into developing an understanding of media literacy. The unit framework and primary sources can be integrated into classrooms of grades 4-12. Each lesson has student objectives that can be accomplished within 40 minute periods over the course of several weeks. A midpoint writing assessment, whole class capstone debate, and final independent writing assessment are included. Support materials are integrated into the lessons, and the primary source document pages can be found at the end of the unit guide.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Case Study, Diagram/Illustration, Interactive, Lesson, Lesson Plan, Primary Source, Reading, Teaching/Learning Strategy, Unit of Study

Author: The Rockefeller Archive Center

Fake News PBL

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Indiana Standard: 7.RN.2.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what a text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 7.RN.3.3 Determine an author’s perspective or purpose in a text, and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from the positions of others. Common Core Standard: Reading Standards for Informational Text Grades 6-12 1. Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 6. Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Author: Lindsay Nunan

Grade 5 Unit: What's News

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Unit OverviewThis unit focuses on the various modes of local, national and world news. Students will read, evaluate and integrate multiple sources of information to gain perspective and understanding of a variety of news events. Through a structured instructional sequence, students will gain knowledge about current news, discuss the events, analyze news sources, identify bias and write brief news articles or reports based on research. The unifying theme, What’s News? will guide students as they discuss the essential question, How does the news influence us?A variety of focus texts and resources are suggested. Depending on your class and available resources, other texts may easily be substituted. Teachers may develop a customized instructional sequence with alternate news articles appropriate to the needs and make-up of the community/school population.It is important teachers prepare fully by reading all resources and consider their students when planning to implement this unit. Time frames may vary depending on the daily amount of instructional time allotted, the student group and the degree of teacher support required for students to meet with success.Teacher Note: The news of today can be very graphic and disturbing. It is important you intentionally select articles and news that do not deal with violence of any kind but that does engage 5th graders. Remember to consciously be aware of this aspect of the news for the general public. Included in this plan are a variety of “kid friendly” news sites to access. You could write a letter to the parents of your class informing them of the unit’s intent and your plan for implementing it. For guidance, watch the TVO video about TKN and Media Literacy video at the bottom of the home page www.teachingkidsnews.com.The lesson models in this unit feature best practices using informational texts to address Common Core State Standards. Included are examples of text dependent questions and sample responses to guide instruction. Students will engage with technology and practice effective listening and speaking skills in collaborative groups to identify key ideas and concepts and to build deeper understanding.Additional Planning and Preparation:Read the entire unit model, associated texts, and resources.Note vocabulary, phrases, concepts, and terminology that may be challenging.Organize the class in groups or pairs for cooperative work and discussion.Access and bookmark web resources your students will use.You many choose to infuse ‘bigger’ questions into discussion such as:What does it take to overcome challenges?How do we face challenges?What kinds of challenges do we face?Are life always challenges necessary to succeed?Universal Design Principles and strategies for English Learners:Organize the class in groups and pairs for discussion and cooperative work.Use multiple modes of presentation to allow acquisition and integration of knowledge and to increase interest and motivation.Offer students choice of tasks and modes of response.Considering using a word processing program or template for students to keep notes such as Google note taking tools.IMPORTANT NOTE: No text model or website referenced in this unit has undergone a formal review. Before using any of these materials, local school systems should conduct a formal approval review to determine their appropriateness. Teachers should always adhere to Acceptable Use Policy enforced by their local school system.Text Models For Lessons and Lesson Seedshttp://teachingkidsnews.comhttps://theconnectedclassroom.wikispaces.com/NewsInterdisciplinary ConnectionsSocial Studies/Geography/Science/Health/Current EventsAdditional ResourcesTeacher ResourcesDaily News at http://www.nwf.orgWashington Post: http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/ecologists-track-dc-ospreys-long-journey-home--from-south-america-to-the-anacostia/2014/04/18/78a5dd18-c3fc-11e3-b195-dd0c1174052c_story.htmlPair these three articles – take down nest, bird rebuilds, rebuild, take down, build platform:http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/osprey-nest-blocking-md-traffic-camera-removed/2014/04/19/64623da8-c7fb-11e3-b708-471bae3cb10c_story.htmlhttp://www.washingtonpost.com/local/md-installs-nesting-platform-for-osprey/2014/04/24/c4c49eda-cbd8-11e3-b81a-6fff56bc591e_story.htmlhttp://www.washingtonpost.com/local/md-considers-nesting-platform-for-ospreys/2014/04/23/b82cf0f0-cb10-11e3-b81a-6fff56bc591e_story.htmlREADWORKShttps://www.readworks.org/passages/new-letter-alphabethttps://www.readworks.org/node/2219 batshttps://www.readworks.org/passages/classical-music-wolfgang-amadeus-mozarthttps://www.readworks.org/passages/cool-be-kind-0https://www.readworks.org/passages/endangered-animals-glancehttps://www.readworks.org/passages/finger-foodhttps://www.readworks.org/passages/homemadehttps://www.readworks.org/passages/meet-soldierScience Fridayhttp://auburnpub.com/science-friday-return-of-the-condor/article_54c3335a-cc67-11e3-acda-001a4bcf887a.htmlTime for Kids           https://www.timeforkids.com/NIEhttp://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/kidspost/http://helenair.com/news/local/th-graders-keep-abreast-of-current-events-school-issues/article_8dad9ea4-cc39-11e3-8e63-001a4bcf887a.htmlhttp://www.nwf.org

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Authors: andrew robertson, MSDE Admin

Fact or Fiction? Evaluating Media in a “Post-Truth” World

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In 2016, Oxford Dictionaries chose "post-truth" as the word of the year. As literacy has shifted from published hardcopy to an online landscape, it is more important than ever to engage and empower students in navigating the complicated battleground of fake news verses responsible, fact-based news. In this multi-day lesson, students will 1) examine terms associated with “fake news” and evaluate sources for their reliability and authenticity, and 2) develop a set of norms for responsible use of online news sources that spans academic and personal interaction with media.Cover image: "Fake news" by pixel2013 from Pixabay.com

Material Type: Lesson Plan

Authors: Alyssa King, MSDE Admin

Identifying Media Bias in News Sources for Middle School

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Every media source has a story to tell--a driving purpose. The media that people consume largely shapes their world views. The US public is becoming more divided partially due to the consumption of increasingly biased news. As a critical consumer of media, It is important to be able to separate fact from opinion. In this unit, adapted from the high school version, students will become critical consumers of news, by identifying media bias in order to become better informed citizens.  NOTE: This unit has been adapted for use at the middle school level from the resource Identifying Media Bias in News Sources by Sandra Stroup, Sally Drendel, Greg Saum, and Heidi Morris.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Assessment, Game, Homework/Assignment, Lesson Plan, Reading, Student Guide, Unit of Study

Authors: Amanda Schneider, Sandra Stroup, Sally Drendel, Heidi Morris, Megan Shinn