CPET@UF - Biomedical Explorations: Bench to Bedside

Our unit serves the Broader Impacts and Translational research components of our campus through summer programs for teachers that engages them in creating learning materials for K-12 students.
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All resources in CPET@UF - Biomedical Explorations: Bench to Bedside

Plant Tissue Culture: Classroom Activities in Plant Biotechnology

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In this activity related to plant biotechnology, learners use the tissue culture process to rapidly produce clones (genetic copies) of a particular plant (cauliflower, rose cuttings, African violet leaves, or carnation stems). This lab will help learners understand a procedure that is often used by scientists to propagate many plants of the same genetic background as well as to understand the importance of sterile techniques. Adult supervision recommended. Modifications for younger learners are included in a related PDF (see related resources). This resource also contains background information and questions with answers for learners.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Lesson Plan, Simulation

Authors: APSnet, Janice Stephens, Jan Leach

DNA Extraction

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In this activity related to plant biotechnology, learners extract DNA from fruit to investigate how it looks and feels. The procedure is similar to what scientists have to do before they can use information contained in this DNA. This lesson guide includes procedure and discussion questions to help learners reflect on the process and purpose of DNA extraction. Modifications for younger learners are included in a related PDF (see related resources).

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Lesson Plan

Authors: APSnet, Janice Stephens, Jan Leach

BITESIZE Biology

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BITESIZE Biology -- õppematerjale bioloogias. Mitmesuguste bioloogiateemade käsitlusi: tekst, skeemid ja animatsioone, testid (The Biosphere, The World of Plants, Animal Survival, Investigating Cells, The Body in Action, Inheritance, Biotechnology…).

Material Type: Assessment, Homework/Assignment, Reading

Biotechnology: Can It Help in Making the Desert Green?

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This learning video introduces high school students to a topic they would not ordinarily study in school, biotechnology, and to different applications of biotechnology that relate to the main theme of the module - making the desert greener. After reviewing traditional methods used for manipulating plants to produce desired traits, students will learn about the methods of making transgenic plants. Dr. Ziad discusses a real world problem that is critical in his country, Jordan, where much of the land is desert. A prerequisite to this video lesson is some background in biology.

Material Type: Lecture

Author: Ziad W. Jaradat, PhD

Biotechnology

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This course will introduce the student to the major concepts of biotechnology. The student will discuss genetic engineering of plants and animals and the current major medical, environmental, and agricultural applications of each. There are also a variety of topics that this course will cover after ranging from nanobiotechnology to environmental biotechnology. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: identify and describe the fields of biotechnology; compare and contrast forward and reverse genetics and the way they influence biodiversity; compare and contrast systemic studies of the genome, transcriptome, and proteome; explain how genome projects are performed, and discuss the completion and the information processing in these projects; describe and explain the principles of existing gene therapies; design strategies that support genetic counseling; explain and analyze DNA fingerprints, and compare DNA fingerprints to non-DNA biometrics; describe and compare bioremediation technologies in air, water, and soil; design strategies for generating genetically modified organisms, and discuss ethical concerns; discuss emerging fields in biotechnology. (Biology 403)

Material Type: Full Course

Frankenfoods?: The Debate Over Genetically Modified Crops

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This discussion case, in which a university research laboratory is vandalized by environmental activists opposed to genetic engineering, focuses on the science and ethics of genetically modified crops. Students consider both the risks and benefits of biotechnology and explore the positions of various stakeholders, including environmentalists, conservationists, agricultural businesses, research scientists, and farmers. Originally written for a vegetable crops course, the case would be appropriate for a wide variety of courses in which biotechnology is discussed.

Material Type: Case Study

Authors: Bill Rhodes, Maha M. Alkhazindar, Nancy A. Schiller

Golden Rice: An Intimate Debate Case

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In this intimate debate case, students consider whether to support the development and use of Golden Rice as a means to alleviate vitamin A deficiency in the developing world. Since many of the arguments typically raised against genetically modified organisms (GMOs) do not apply to this particular GM crop, students are forced to analyze the facts rather than rely on what they have heard in the media. Developed for an introductory molecular biology undergraduate course, the case could also be used at more senior levels.

Material Type: Case Study

Author: Annie PrudĽË_homme Genereux

Do You Really Know What You're Eating?: A Case Study on Genetically Modified Foods

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Starting from a fictional "news" report about an apparent allergic reaction to a taco tainted by genetically modified corn, students consider some of the techniques and procedures used in modern molecular genetics and microbiology as well as some of the issues associated with genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Originally designed for role-play and PowerPoint assignments, suggestions for a shortened version are also provided. Suitable for a general microbiology course, the case could also be used in an introductory molecular biology course with appropriate modifications. Various levels of coverage of the topic of recombinant DNA are possible.

Material Type: Case Study

Authors: Mary Celeste Reese, Wayne Shew

Logic Puzzles for Chemistry

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An issue of the Journal of Chemical Education (April 1999, 76 (4)) highlighted the teaching of chemistry through games, puzzles and humor. Following this theme, we have created three logic puzzles for use with high school chemistry. A fair amount of chemistry content knowledge is needed to solve these puzzles. They were written as a fun, challenging and interesting way to demonstrate knowledge of basic colligative properties and electrochemistry. All of the puzzles were written as stand-alone activities, though, they certainly could be used with other activities, or as a form of assessment.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Assessment

Authors: David Brooks, Kent Crippen

Artificial Heart Design Challenge

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Students are presented with a hypothetical scenario in which they are biomedical engineers asked to design artificial hearts. Using the engineering design process as a guide, the challenge is established and students brainstorm to list everything they might need to know about the heart in order to create a complete mechanical replacement (size, how it functions, path of blood etc.). They conduct research to learn the information and organize it through various activities. They research artificial heart models that have already been used and rate their performance in clinical trials. Finally, they analyze the data to identify the artificial heart features and properties they think work best and document their findings in essay form.

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Author: Angela D. Kolonich

Biomedical Engineering and the Human Body

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Human beings are fascinating and complex living organisms a symphony of different functional systems working in concert. Through a 10-lesson series with hands-on activities students are introduced to seven systems of the human body skeletal, muscular, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, sensory, and reproductive as well as genetics. At every stage, they are also introduced to engineers' creative, real-world involvement in caring for the human body.

Material Type: Full Course

Building the Neuron

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What does the brain look like? As engineers, how can we look at neural networks without invasive surgery? In this activity, students design and build neuron models based on observations made while viewing neurons through a microscope. The models are used to explain how each structure of the neuron contributes to the overall function. Students share their models with younger students and explain what a neuron is, its function, and how engineers use their understanding of the neuron to make devices to activate neurons.

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Author: Janelle Orange

ATP: The Fuel of Life

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The goal of this lesson is to introduce students who are interested in human biology and biochemistry to the subtleties of energy metabolism (typically not presented in standard biology and biochemistry textbooks) through the lens of ATP as the primary energy currency of the cell. Avoiding the details of the major pathways of energy production (such as glycolysis, the citric acid cycle, and oxidative phosphorylation), this lesson is focused exclusively on ATP, which is truly the fuel of life. Starting with the discovery and history of ATP, this lesson will walk the students through 8 segments (outlined below) interspersed by 7 in-class challenge questions and activities, to the final step of ATP production by the ATP synthase, an amazing molecular machine. A basic understanding of the components and subcellular organization (e.g. organelles, membranes, etc.) and chemical foundation (e.g. biomolecules, chemical equilibrium, biochemical energetics, etc.) of a eukaryotic cell is a desired prerequisite, but it is not a must. Through interactive in-class activities, this lesson is designed to spark the students’ interest in biochemistry and human biology as a whole, but could serve as an introductory lesson to teaching advanced concepts of metabolism and bioenergetics in high school depending on the local science curriculum. No supplies or materials are needed.

Material Type: Lecture

Author: Christian Schubert

Cellular Respiration and Bioremediation

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In this lesson, students learn about the basics of cellular respiration. They also learn about the application of cellular respiration to engineering and bioremediation. And, students are introduced to the process of bioremediation and several examples of how bioremediation is used during the cleanup of environmental contaminants.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Lesson Plan

Authors: Janet Yowell, Kaelin Cawley, Malinda Schaefer Zarske

Who Owns Rights To Pharmacogenetic Information?

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This lesson guides students to examine the potential benefits, risks, and ethical concerns of designer drugs. Students begin by reading an article titled Ethical Issues in Pharmacogenetics by Carol Isaacson Barash, an ActionBioscience.org original article. Next they will read information on the National Human Genome Research Institute on Pharmacogenetics: Frequently Asked Questions about Pharmacogenomics. Instructors can then use the lesson to guide students through shorter activities and/or one main activity. The smaller activities involve students in describing the research behind the issue, making it accessible to a less-informed audience, and in exploring the ethical issues outlined in the article to support various points of view. The larger activity is for upper level students to gather evidence to support particular perspectives so that they can present different views about the ownership of human DNA information.

Material Type: Activity/Lab

Author: Susan Musante

The Pompe Predicament - Lesson One

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A first person story is presented to the students to hook their interest in the disease. Using a jigsaw approach, students will learn about the fundamentals of Pompe disease and share information during a whole class discussion. The Pompe Predicament was developed as a part of Biomedical Explorations: Bench to Bedside which was supported by the National Center for Research Resources and the Division of Program Coordination, Planning, and Strategic Initiatives of the National Institutes of Health through Grant Number R25RR023294. Additional support provided by the University of Florida (UF) and the UF Center for Precollegiate Education and Training. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Center for Research Resources or the National Institutes of Health.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Lesson Plan, Primary Source, Simulation, Teaching/Learning Strategy, Unit of Study

Author: Julie Bokor

The Pompe Predicament Lesson Two

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Working in groups, students will read Pompe fact cards and use text clues to sequence the events in the discovery and treatment of Pompe disease. This lesson illustrates scientific discovery as a collaborative effort of many individuals building on prior knowledge and developing unique ideas to explore.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Case Study, Lesson Plan