Alamo Colleges

Alamo Colleges Online is in the midst of evaluating their online courses and exploring how Open Educational Resources can fit into their course development and redesign processes. Alamo is partnering with OER Commons to provide roadmap consulting, training, and a suite of tools is seen as an important step in building awareness and capacity for the use of OERs within Alamo College’s online courses. This groups is a collaborative workspace where participants can discuss, evaluate, and organize OER. http://www.oercommons.org/hubs/Alamo-Colleges
19 members | 106 affiliated resources

All resources in Alamo Colleges

Rio Salado Essential Reading

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Welcome to Essential Reading. This course has been designed to enable you to focus your learning on specific areas of improvement. Unlike a typical college course where you would complete lessons in chronological order, this course allows you to focus on just specific skills. Modules Include: Recognition and Decoding, Vocabulary, and Functional and Informational Texts

Material Type: Full Course, Lecture, Reading

Rio Salado Essential Writing

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This course has been designed to enable you to focus your learning on specific areas of improvement. Unlike a typical college course where you would complete lessons in chronological order, this course allows you to focus on just specific skills. Modules include: Grammer, Pre Writing, and Writing

Material Type: Full Course, Lecture, Reading

Rio Salado Essential Math

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This course has been designed to help students focus learning on specific areas of improvement. Unlike a typical college course where you would complete lessons in chronological order, this course allows you to focus on specific skills. Modules include: Arithmetic Review, Percents, Geometric Figures, Measurement, and Statistics

Material Type: Full Course, Lecture, Reading

Introduction to Psychology

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This course is an introduction to the fundamental principles of psychology. It begins with a short overview of the discipline's development and principal methodologies. The subsequent units are arranged around broad areas of research, including emotion, development, memory, and psychopathology. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Identify the steps of the scientific method and explain how this method applies to psychological research methodology and statistical analyses; Demonstrate an understanding of the general history of the field; Explain the nature versus nurture argument and the current status of thinking regarding gene-environment interaction; Identify the basic components and mechanisms of the major biological systems often studied in psychology; Demonstrate an understanding of the basic findings within a variety of areas of psychology, including sensation and perception, memory and learning, development, social psychology, and psychopathology. (Psychology 101)

Material Type: Assessment, Full Course, Lecture, Reading, Syllabus

Psychology in the 21st Century

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Psychology is not a simple subject. This unit examines how different aspects of human behavior provide the focus for different psychologists. Using learning as an example, you will discover how many different approaches can be adopted thus illustrating that there is no single way of answering psychological questions.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Reading, Syllabus

Social Psychology

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This course will introduce you to the concepts of social psychology, which focuses primarily on the individual's psychology as part of the group or society. Because humans are social creatures and almost invariably exist in a social context, social psychology deals with a huge range of aspects of human life, including love, attraction, aggression, helping behaviors (or altruism), and obedience. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Identify the specific areas of research interest within the field of social psychology; Read and understand articles pertaining to experiments and other empirical research in the field of social psychology; Outline the basic methodology, results, and impact of seminal research studies in social psychology (e.g., Milgram's study, Asch's study, Festinger's study, etc.); Explain how the notion of the 'self' contributes to cognitive processes in social interaction; Demonstrate an awareness of the main research findings in the area of social persuasion; Define the term 'attitude' and identify the mechanisms behind attitude change; Discuss the cognitive and affective theories/components linked to stereotypes, prejudice, and discrimination; Identify the basic properties of and factors involved in interpersonal attraction and the formation and maintenance of relationships; Demonstrate an awareness of the breadth and importance of social psychological research and its impact in the field of psychology. (Psychology 301)

Material Type: Assessment, Full Course, Lecture, Lecture Notes, Reading, Syllabus

Introduction to Sociology

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This course is designed to introduce you to a range of basic sociological principles so that you can develop your own sociological imagination. You will learn about the origins of sociology as a discipline and be introduced to major sociological theories and methods of research. You will also explore such topics as sex and gender, deviance, and racism.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Full Course, Homework/Assignment, Reading, Syllabus

Introduction to Sociology 2e

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Introduction to Sociology is intended for a one-semester introductory sociology course. Conceived of and developed by active sociology instructors, this up-to-date title and can be downloaded now by clicking on the "Get this book" button below. This online, fully editable and customizable title includes sociology theory and research; real-world applications; simplify and debate features; and learning objectives for each chapter

Material Type: Textbook

Authors: Eric Strayer, Faye Jones, Gail Scaramuzzo, Jeff Bry, Nathan Keirns, Sally Vyain, Susan Cody-Rydezerski, Tommy Sadler

Criminal Justice Model

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Students learn the principles of the criminal justice field, the many criminal justice agencies, and federal, state and local laws.The course of study includes: historical perspective of American police agencies, with an emphasis on California law enforcement; philosophy of the origins of crime and the social impact on society; development of the criminal justice system, current trends and their relevance to local and state law enforcement; hiring and testing processes for positions in law enforcement; laws of arrest, search and seizure laws; court process; penal and vehicle codes - what constitutes a crime; child abuse and related offenses; drug and alcohol abuse and related offenses.

Material Type: Full Course, Lesson Plan

Intro to Sociology (SOC 101)

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Sociology is the study of social groups, structures, processes, institutions, and events. This course will focus on understanding and applying the sociological perspective, which stresses the importance of the impact of social forces external to the individual in shaping peopleęs lives and experiences. This idea that we are all profoundly affected by the society in which we live is the guiding light of sociology. Sociologists also study the ways in which people, as they interact, shape their social systems. Topics studied will include socialization, social interaction, culture, groups, social structure, deviance, social inequality, social class, race, gender, institutions (political, economic, educational, family, and religious), collective behavior and social change. Students will be asked to learn the basic concepts, theories, and perspectives of sociology, to see how these operate in terms of social processes, structures, and events, and to apply this knowledge to better understand the social world.

Material Type: Assessment, Full Course, Reading, Syllabus

Introduction to Philosophy

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This course introduces students to the major topics, problems, and methods of philosophy and surveys the writings of a number of major historical figures in the field. Several of the core areas of philosophy are explored, including metaphysics, epistemology, political philosophy, ethics, and the philosophy of religion. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Identify and describe the major areas of philosophical inquiry, explain how those areas differ from and relate to one another, and place the views and arguments of major philosophical figures within those thematic categories; Use philosophical terminology correctly and consistently; Identify and describe the views of a number of major philosophers and articulate how these views are created in response to general philosophical problems or to the views of other philosophers; Explain the broad outlines of the history of philosophy as a framework that can be applied in more advanced courses; Identify strengths and weaknesses in the arguments philosophers have put forward for their views and formulate objections and counterarguments of your own invention; Apply critical thinking and reasoning skills in a wide range of career paths and courses of study. (Philosophy 101)

Material Type: Assessment, Full Course, Homework/Assignment, Lecture, Reading, Syllabus

Introducing Philosophy

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Ever wondered what it would be like to study philosophy? This unit will introduce you to the teaching methods employed and the types of activities and assignments you would be asked to undertake should you wish to study OU course A211 Philosophy and the human situation.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Reading, Syllabus

Persuasive Speech Evaluation Form

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Faculty considering a persuasive speech as a class assignment should use a persuasive speech evaluation form for the assignment. The evaluation form or rubric will permit more efficient grading on the part of faculty. The evaluation form contains criteria which is traditionally used when evaluating a speech.

Material Type: Assessment

Author: Joseph Coppola

Selected Topics in Architecture: Architecture from 1750 to the Present, Fall 2004

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General study of modern architecture as a response to important technological, cultural, environmental, aesthetic, and theoretical challenges after the European Enlightenment. Focus on the theoretical, historiographic, and design approaches to architectural problems encountered in the age of industrial and post-industrial expansion across the globe, with specific attention to the dominance of European modernism in setting the agenda for the discourse of a global modernity at large. Explores modern architectural history through thematic exposition rather than as simple chronological succession of ideas.

Material Type: Full Course

Author: Dutta, Arindam

Great Writers Inspire: Shakespeare's Contemporary Dramatists

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The Elizabethan and Jacobean theatres specialized in new plays which had relatively few performances over a period of a few weeks. There was thus a huge appetite for fresh writing, and hundreds of plays, many now lost, were produced, often collaboratively. In this section of Great Writers Inspire some of these non-Shakespearean plays and authors are introduced through a combination of podcasts, eBooks and supporting materials.

Material Type: Diagram/Illustration, Lecture, Reading

Authors: Emma Smith, Kate O'Connor

Studies in Drama: Too Hot to Handle: Forbidden Plays in Modern America, Fall 2008

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Unlike film, theater in America does not have a ratings board that censors content. So plays have had more freedom to explore and to transgress normative culture. Yet censorship of the theater has been part of American culture from the beginning, and continues today. How and why does this happen, and who decides whether a play is too dangerous to see or to teach? Are plays dangerous? Sinful? Even demonic? In our seminar, we will study plays that have been censored, either legally or extra-legally (i.e. refused production, closed down during production, denied funding, or taken off school reading lists). We'll look at laws, both national and local, relating to the "obscene", as well as unofficial practices, and think about the way censorship operates in American life now. And of course we will study the offending texts, themselves, to find what is really dangerous about them, for ourselves.

Material Type: Full Course

Authors: Anne, Fleche

Acceso

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Acceso is a complete, interactive curriculum for intermediate-level learners of Spanish. The materials on the site are provided freely to the public and are intended as a replacement for commercial textbooks, which are generally ill-suited to the learning outcomes now considered crucial to successful language study. These materials are supplemented by an online workbook built on the MySpanishLab platform of Pearson Education, Inc., as well as detailed lesson plans, rubrics for the evaluation of student work, and reliable instruments for measuring student progress and learning outcomes.Winner of 2012 Computer Assisted Language Consortium (CALICO) Focus AwardReviewed in:CALICO Journal 29.2 (Jan 2012): 398-405.Hispania 95.2 (June 2012): 365-366

Material Type: Full Course, Textbook

Author: Amy Rossomondo et al.

Obesity Epidemic

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A one page activity that takes students to several websites related to the obesity epidemic. First they can calculate BMI, then learn about national trends in the rate of obesity and finally use a tutorial on insulin and diabetes.

Material Type: Activity/Lab, Homework/Assignment, Simulation

Author: Scott Cooper