Composition, Rhetoric, & Communication

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College Reading
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

College Reading I designed to meet a variety of more advanced reading and study skill needs, primarily the need to read college level materials more effectively. Students learn to recognize main ideas, to read an article or chapter and remember its key points, to take inclusive, meaningful notes, to read actively and critically, to explore memory techniques, and to respond to our language with greater vocabulary depth. PLEASE NOTE: This course is a developmental course and DOES NOT carry graduation credit. It is NOT usually transferable. Since developmental courses are mandated courses, students who do not meet the exit criteria of a C or higher will be required to repeat it.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Northern Essex Community College
Author:
Marilyn McCarthy
Date Added:
05/15/2019
English Composition 2
Read the Fine Print
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Composition 2 is an expository writing course requiring more advanced writing skills than Composition 1, yet reviewing and incorporating some of the same skills. This course teaches research skills by emphasizing the development of advanced analytical/critical reading skills, proficiency in investigative research, and the writing of persuasive prose including documented and researched argumentative essays. A major component of this course will be an emphasis on the research process and information literacy.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Full Course
Textbook
Provider:
Lumen Learning
Provider Set:
Candela Courseware
Date Added:
03/31/2016
Information literacy rubric
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Deb Baker created this after consulting with faculty, librarians, and colleagues from around the country. The idea was to create a practical tool for assessing information literacy that anyone could use, was easy to norm, and focused on what students could do and where research instruction could be improved to increase students' information literacy. This rubric can help improve student success and information literacy learning outcomes in research assignments for any course. Used early in the semester it can serve as a diagnostic tool for supporting student researchers in developing the skills and habits of mind needed to successfully find and use information to answer a question, support a thesis, or solve a problem. Students could even use it to self-assess.

Cover photo by Glenn Carstens-Peters on Unsplash

Subject:
Information Science
Education
Higher Education
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Assessment
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Deb Baker
Date Added:
11/18/2020
Lumen Learning Basic Reading and Writing
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Basic Reading and Writing builds a solid foundation around core aspects of the writing process: critical reading; methodical writing; research and documentation; practical grammar and punctuation. An optional module introduces core principles for college success that help students understand and develop good habits to improve their performance in this and other college courses. As the first in a three-course sequence that culminates in Composition I (college-level composition), Basic Reading and Writing focuses on helping students identify and apply foundational concepts and skills in reading and writing. Course content may be used for standard instruction or diagnostically to discover and address gaps in student understanding/skill.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Interactive
Lesson
Reading
Provider:
Lumen Learning
Date Added:
08/29/2018
Research Success - a self-paced information literacy mini course
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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What is information literacy? Simply put, it's the skills and habits that allow you to find and use information. At MCC it is a Core Learning Outcome -- one of the areas you will demonstrate competency in before you graduate. In the Academic Catalog, MCC states that Information Literacy is:

"The ability to know when there is a need for information, to be able to identify, locate, evaluate and effectively and responsibly use and share that information for the problem at hand."

The way information literacy is assessed at MCC is through research assignments. When you see instructions that ask you to find, use and cite sources, you're doing research.

This course will help you succeed in research assignments.

It is divided into five self-paced chapters that progress through the stages of a student research process. Each chapter should take roughly 30 minutes to complete, and covers two to three learning outcomes that align with the Framework for Information Literacy in Higher Education, adopted by the Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) in 2016.

This course is adapted by Deb Baker from "Information Literacy for College Students" by Amanda Burbage & Olivia Reinauer, licensed under CC BY 4.0. Many resources included in the course have been reused/remixed and may hold different versions of Creative Commons licenses. Please note that if you use or adapt any of the individual resources this course, you should abide by the licensing for that specific resource.

Subject:
Information Science
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Full Course
Author:
Amanda Burbage
Deb Baker
Olivia Reinauer
Date Added:
10/14/2020