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astroEDU makes the best science activities, particularly those with an astronomical, earth or space science focus, accessible to educators around the world.

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The 4-Point Backyard Diurnal Parallax Method
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

On field, students have to image a given asteroid on two consecutive nights, producing two sets of images obtained over 10-15 minutes, each set separated by about 4-5 hours. In class, students have to process the images in order to measure the observed diurnal parallax and then determine the corresponding asteroid distance.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Eduardo Manuel Alvarez
Date Added:
02/06/2018
AstroPoetry Writing
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

An activity combining language and science to encourage students to think about the night sky to help them write a poem related to astronomy.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Physical Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Christie McMonigal, Astronomers Without Borders
Date Added:
02/02/2016
Astronomy Snakes & Ladders Game
Rating

The classic snakes and ladders game is replaced by rockets and comets in this astronomy themed version. The game is challenging and interactive way to learn various astronomical topics while moving your way to the winning square as space travellers.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Game
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Avivah Yamani
Date Added:
04/04/2014
Blue Marble Floating in Empty Space
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Using photographs and models, students are taken on a virtual journey to outer space. They can look back at the Earth as they travel further away and see it growing increasingly smaller, giving the experience that we live on a tiny planet that floats in a vast and empty space.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Interactive
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Erik Arends
Date Added:
02/06/2015
Children's Planetary Maps: Io
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Using planetary maps, students will be able to read cartographic information and compare the environmental conditions of Io to those Earth. They will understand the conditions needed for life to exist, and be able to explain why it cannot exist on Io.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Astronomy
Geology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Henrik Hargitai
Mátyás Gede
Date Added:
02/06/2018
Children's Planetary Maps: Mars
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Using planetary maps, students will be able to read cartographic information and compare the environmental conditions of Mars to those Earth. They will understand the conditions needed for life to exist, and be able to explain why it cannot exist on Mars.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Astronomy
Geology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Henrik Hargitai
Mátyás Gede
Date Added:
02/06/2018
Children's Planetary Maps: Pluto & Charon
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Using planetary maps, students will be able to read cartographic information and compare the environmental conditions of Pluto/Charon to those Earth. They will understand the conditions needed for life to exist, and be able to explain why it cannot exist on Pluto or Charon.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Astronomy
Geology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Henrik Hargitai
Mátyás Gede
Date Added:
02/06/2018
Children's Planetary Maps: The Moon
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Using planetary maps, students will be able to read cartographic information and compare the environmental conditions of The Moon to those Earth. They will understand the conditions needed for life to exist, and be able to explain why it cannot exist on The Moon.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Astronomy
Geology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Henrik Hargitai
Mátyás Gede
Date Added:
02/06/2018
Children's Planetary Maps: Titan
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Using planetary maps, students will be able to read cartographic information and compare the environmental conditions of Titan to those Earth. They will understand the conditions needed for life to exist, and be able to explain why it cannot exist on Titan.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Astronomy
Geology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Henrik Hargitai
Mátyás Gede
Date Added:
02/06/2018
Children's Planetary Maps: Venus
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Using planetary maps, students will be able to read cartographic information and compare the environmental conditions of Venus to those Earth. They will understand the conditions needed for life to exist, and be able to explain why it cannot exist on Venus.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Astronomy
Geology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Henrik Hargitai
Mátyás Gede
Date Added:
02/06/2018
Coma Cluster of Galaxies
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This classroom activity for high school students uses a collection of Hubble Space Telescope images of galaxies in the Coma Cluster. Students study galaxy classification and the evolution of galaxies in dense clustered environments.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Keely Finkelstein, McDonald Observatory
Date Added:
06/24/2014
Continental Climate and Oceanic Climate
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This activity proposes different small experiments and discussions to show that in the summer it is cooler by the sea than on the land and that water cools off more slowly than soil.

Subject:
Physical Science
Oceanography
Physical Geography
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Leiden Observatory
Date Added:
01/01/2016
Counting Sunspots
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Using solar images and date obtained from Astronomical Observatory of the University of Coimbra lets you study the sunspots and their behaviour over days.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Game
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Joao Fernandes, University of Coimbra
Date Added:
01/30/2014
Country Movers – Visualizing Spatial Scales in Planetary and Earth Sciences
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Students learn about local and planetary physical geography / geology, toponymy, planetary landing site selection and cartography. The students learn a complex process of landscape evaluation and city planning, based on the interpretation of photomaps or digital terrain models.

Subject:
Astronomy
Physical Geography
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Henrik Hargitai
Mátyás Gede
Date Added:
02/06/2018
Create Your Own Astro-Music
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

In this activity, students learn about astronomical phenomena we can see in the universe and create their own music inspired by astronomical images. By performing original musical improvisations, students enhance their knowledge of what astronomical phenomena are represented in images and experiment with creative ways of representing these using music. This activity engages students in first hand exploration of music and astronomy connections.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Matthew Whitehouse
Date Added:
12/09/2016
Creating Asteroids
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

In this activity, students familiarise themselves with asteroids. They discuss and build their own model asteroids. They learn how asteroids are formed in the Solar System. At the end of the activity, each student has their own model asteroid made from clay.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Angela Perez
Tibisay Sankatsing Nava
Date Added:
02/06/2018
Day and Night in the World
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This activity allows pupils to learn the difference between diurnal and nocturnal animals, understand that when it is day here, it is night on the other side of the world, and that it is light when the Sun comes up and it is dark when the Sun goes down. At the end, pupils build a model of the Earth and can experiment with day and night.

Subject:
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Date Added:
01/01/2016
Deadly Moons
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

From Earth’s moon to Europa, our solar system is filled with interesting set of natural satellites. Through art and science, children learn about moons of our solar system with the Deadly Moons activity.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Deirdre Kelleghan
Date Added:
04/17/2014
Design Your Alien
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Review the environmental factors that make the Earth habitable and compare them to other worlds within our Solar System. Use creative thinking to design an alien life form suited for specific environmental conditions on an extra-terrestrial world within our Solar System.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Game
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Sarah Roberts
Date Added:
12/13/2013
Evening Sky Watching for Students
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Nursery (or Kindergarten or Preschool) students enjoy seeing the evening sky with the teacher from the playground or through a big window (indoor). This is especially relevant for students who stay for extra-hour care. During late evening hours, some students feel a little lonely waiting for their parents, but they have a wonderful natural treasure: the evening sky. By observing the evening sky with the naked eye, they will notice many colours, changing colours, the first star, the subtle colours of stars, twinkling stars, and the movement of stars. Nursery teachers who think they are not science-oriented will also gain guidance skills of introducing science to students. This activity is also useful for primary school students, especially younger-grade students.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Akihiko Tomita
Date Added:
01/01/2016
The Fibre Optic Cable Class
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This activity is an interactive “out-of-the-seat” demo that allows the students to become involved in learning about fibre optic cables by imitating the way that one basically functions. While enjoying the physicality of the demo the children will pick up basic details of light, reflection, optical properties, and applications to technology. Additionally, the activity will go into details of how fibre optics are used in astronomy technology and how it is used to improve our understanding of the universe. An emphasis should be placed on asking direct questions to the children about how these concepts can influence technology, astronomy, and our world to reinforce the concepts that they are learning about.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Amee Hennig
Date Added:
02/06/2015
Fizzy Balloons - CO2 in School
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

When you add water to effervescent (fizzy) tablets or baking powder, bubbles are formed: a gas is produced. You can use this gas to inflate a balloon without blowing it up yourself. What kind of gas is it? Let us collect this gas and analyse it through experiments.

Subject:
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Date Added:
01/01/2016
Glitter Your Milky Way
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Have you ever wondered where we are in our own galaxy, Milky Way? "Glitter Your Milky Way" let you get creative while learning the characteristics of the Milky Way and exploring the types of galaxies.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Kathleen Horner, Astronomers Without Borders
Date Added:
01/30/2014
Globe at Night Activity Guide
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Students participate in a global campaign to observe and record the faintest visible stars as a means of measuring light pollution in a given location. By locating and observing the constellation Orion in the night sky and comparing it to stellar charts, students from around the world will learn how the artificial lighting in their community contribute to light pollution. Student contributions to the online database will document the visible night time sky.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Amee Hennig
Date Added:
04/17/2014
History of the Universe
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Students investigate how old the universe is and when important events took place in the universe and on Earth. They draw the universe timeline from the beginning until today on the scale of a year.

Subject:
History
Mathematics
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Date Added:
01/01/2016
How High is the Sky?
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This activity aims to teach students about the different layers of the atmosphere. It also aims to teach them which part of our atmosphere is considered outer space and what phenomena occur in each layer.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Interactive
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Rogel Mari Sese, Regulus Space Tech
Date Added:
01/30/2014
How Light Pollution Affects the Stars: Magnitude Readers
Rating

Light pollution affects the visibility of stars. Building a simple Magnitude Reader, students determine the magnitude of stars and learn about limiting magnitude.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Amee Hennig
Date Added:
04/04/2014
How Many Stars Can You See at Night?
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Students will study through investigation the effects of light pollution on night sky observation. They will share their results and suggest improvement within the community.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Jose Goncalves, Nucleo Interativo de Astronomia; Franziska Zaunig, Cardiff University
Date Added:
02/02/2016
How To Travel on Earth Without Getting Lost
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

With this activity, students use a globe to learn how a position on Earth can be described. They investigate how latitude can be found using the stars. Students learn what latitude and longitude are and how to use them to indicate a position on Earth. They investigate how in some locations on Earth, the direction of the midday sun can change over the year.

Subject:
Physical Geography
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Leiden Observatory
Date Added:
01/01/2016
Impact Craters
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

The students will learn about recent meteor strikes and the effects they can have. They will then examine their significance in the history of the planet, and what they do to the surface of a planet when forming a crater. The students will then experimentally determine how the size and impact velocity of a meteorite determine the size of the crater.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Christian Eistrup
Ronan Smith
Date Added:
02/06/2018
Investigating the Atmosphere – Air Takes Up Space
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This is a hands-on activity to show that air takes up space even though you cannot see it.The goal is to understand that gas occupies space and relate it to real situations that prove it.

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Leiden Observatory
Date Added:
01/01/2016
Let's Break the Particles
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This is a hands-on activity to learn that energy can be transformed into various forms. Potential energy is converted into kinetic energy. Moreover, this kinetic energy can be used (if more than the relative binding energy) to break atoms, particles and molecules to see “inside” and to study their constituents.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Sandro Bardelli, INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna; Amalia Persico, Sofos-Divulgazione delle Scienze
Date Added:
02/02/2016
Let's Map the Earth
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

In this activity, students familiarise themselves with the concept of a map by observing and describing maps, and drawing a map from an aerial photograph. They understand that any location on Earth is described by two numbers, latitude and longitude. The notion of scale and ratio is also explored.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Mathematics
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Date Added:
01/01/2016
Lunar Day
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Two children act as the Moon and the Earth. By holding hands and spinning around they mimic the tidal locking of the Moon. They note that the Moon always keeps the same face towards Earth.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Sethanne Howard, US Naval Observatory
Date Added:
02/02/2016
Lunar Landscape
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

In this 30 to 45 minute activity, children (in teams of 4-5) experiment to create craters and learn about the landscape of the moon. The children make observations on how the size and mass, direction, and velocity of the projectile impacts the size and shape of the crater.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Jaya Ramchandani, UNAWE
Date Added:
01/30/2014
Making a Sundial
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

In this activity, students discuss the notion of time and how time can be measured. They learn that a long time ago, people used different tools to measure time. Students build and use a sundial and discover that a long time ago, it was much more difficult to accurately tell the time than it is today.

Subject:
Applied Science
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Date Added:
01/01/2016
Measure Diameter of the Sun
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

The Sun moves across the sky at an approximately constant rate because of the rotation of the Earth. By measuring how fast the Sun moves, you can work out how big the Sun appears in the sky. All you need are some household items and about 30 minutes on a sunny day.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Interactive
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Edward Gomez, LCOGT
Date Added:
01/30/2014
Meet Our Home: Planet Earth
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Converting a visual to a tactile experience, this activity lets visually impaired students learn about and explore some of the characteristics of our home planet, the Earth.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Lina Canas, Nucleo Interativo de Astronomia
Date Added:
02/02/2016
Meet Our Neighbour: Sun
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Converting the visual to tactile experience, this activity let visually impaired students to learn and explore about our star, Sun, and its main characteristics.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Lina Canas, Nucleo Interativo de Astronomia
Date Added:
01/30/2014
Meet Our Neighbours: Moon
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Converting a visual experience to a tactile one, this activity lets visually impaired students learn and explore our Moon and its characteristics.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Lina Canas, Nucleo Interativo de Astronomia
Date Added:
06/25/2014
Meteoroids, Meteors and Meteorites
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Students will experimentally learn how meteoroids are formed. They will melt a comet, learning about its composition, and break apart asteroids. The students learn the differences between meteoroids, meteors and meteorites and how the impact of asteroids/meteoroids can affect life on Earth.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Christian Eistrup
Jorge Rivero González
Ronan Smith
Date Added:
02/06/2018
Model of a Black Hole
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Many children may have heard of black holes and already have the understanding that they are ‘bottomless wells’. If something falls into a black hole, it is impossible for it to escape—even light cannot escape and is swallowed. The lack of light is how black holes get their name. These objects are mysterious and interesting, but they are not easy to explain. This activity will allow children to visualize, and therefore help them decompose, the concepts of space-time and gravity, which are integral to understanding these appealing objects.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Game
Interactive
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Monica Turner, UNAWE
Date Added:
12/13/2013
Navigation in the Ancient Mediterranean and Beyond
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This lesson unit provides an insight into the navigational methods of the Bronze Age Mediterranean peoples. The students explore the link between history and astronomical knowledge. Besides an overview of ancient seafaring in the Mediterranean, the students use activities to explore early navigational skills using the stars and constellations and their apparent nightly movement across the sky. In the course of the activities, they become familiar with the stellar constellations and how they are distributed across the northern and southern sky.

Subject:
History
Astronomy
Physical Geography
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Markus Nielbock
Date Added:
02/06/2018
Seasons Around the World
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Description:

Build a model of the Earth, with its spin-axis, and a lamp as the Sun to demonstrate the concept of seasons.

Goals

--Understanding why we have seasons and the cause of seasonal variation in temperature.
--Learning about how the Earth rotates on a tilted axis compared to its orbit around the Sun.

Learning Objectives

--Students learn about seasons by building a model of the Earth and the Sun, and investigating how sunlight hits the Northern and Southern Hemispheres during different seasons.
--Students explain that the same amount of light hitting the ground heats up a small area more than a large area
--Students show that the angle at which the sunlight hits the Earth influences how much the sunlight heats up the Earth.
Students demonstrate that the angle at which the sunlight hits the Earth is related to the tilt of the Earth’s rotational axis compared to the Earth’s orbit around the Sun.

Subject:
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Leiden Observatory
Date Added:
07/24/2017
Solar System Model
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

The students will paint and arrange spheres to form a model of the solar system. They will first make models using the plastic spheres of different sizes. Then they will make similar models using clay, cotton, etc., and organize them in the right order from the Sun.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Syeda Lammim Ahad, Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology
Date Added:
02/02/2016
Solar System Model on a City Map
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This activity is based on a reduced-scale model of the Solar System built on a map of a city students are familiar with. This provides them with an understanding of the great distances between the different bodies of the Solar System and their relative size. Students will investigate the characteristics that are required from these bodies to build a scale model using common objects.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Mayte Vasquez, German Aerospace Center
Date Added:
01/15/2016
Star Hats
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

What is a star and what shape is it? Students explore both artistic and scientific representations of stars, learn that stars are like the sun but much further away and make their own star hat.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Tasneem Rossenkhan
Date Added:
01/01/2016
Star in a Box: Advanced
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Have you ever wondered what happens to the different stars in the night sky as they get older? The Star in a Box application lets you explore the life cycle of stars. It animates stars with different starting masses as they change during their lives. Some stars live fast-paced, dramatic lives; others change very little for billions of years. The app visualises the changes in mass, size, brightness and temperature for all these different stages.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Game
Interactive
Simulation
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Edward Gomez, LCOGT
Date Added:
01/30/2014
Star in a Box: High School
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Have you ever wondered what happens to the different stars in the night sky as they get older? The Star in a Box application lets you explore the life cycle of stars. It animates stars with different starting masses as they change during their lives. Some stars live fast-paced, dramatic lives; others change very little for billions of years. The app visualises the changes in mass, size, brightness and temperature for all these different stages.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Game
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Edward Gomez, LCOGT
Date Added:
01/30/2014
Street Lights as Standard Candles
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Street lights of the same type will look brighter when they are close to you, and less bright when they are farther away. The same applies to astronomical objects: a given star will look brighter to a nearby observer than to an observer far away. In both cases, the difference in brightness can be used to deduce the relative distances of suitable objects. Standard candles, objects of constant intrinsic brightness or whose intrinsic brightness can be determined by careful measurements, are a key tool for astronomical distance determination. In this exploration, you will explore standard candles (and also effects that complicate distance measurements) in a simple everyday setting, namely that of street lights, using a digital camera and freely available software.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Markus Pössel
Date Added:
01/01/2016
Sun, Earth and Moon Model
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Students build a model of the Sun-Earth-Moon system, exploring how the Moon revolves around the Earth, and the Earth around the Sun. Students play a memory game and learn some characteristics about the three objects.

Subject:
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Game
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Date Added:
01/01/2016
Sun's Shadow
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Watch shadows during the course of the day to explore the influence of the Sun’s position in the sky on them, as well as how they change over the seasons. During the next season, repeat the experiment and note the changes from the previous season. Repeat over a period of one year for each season.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Tasneem Rossenkhan, UNAWE
Date Added:
02/02/2016
What is Time?
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In this activity, students discuss the notion of time and how time can be measured. They build an hourglass to measure time and test it. This activity will allow students to have a better understanding of time and the instruments that can be used to measure it.

Subject:
Applied Science
Mathematics
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Date Added:
01/01/2016
What is a Constellation?
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
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Students investigate three-dimensional objects. They compare what constellations look like when seen from different angles. They make a model of a constellation and look at it from different sides to discover that the relative position of the stars changes depending on our perspective. They understand that stars are not located on the same plane and or the same distance.

Subject:
Mathematics
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Date Added:
01/01/2016