Faculty-Created Modules for School Librarian Preparation

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Faculty-Created Modules for School Librarian Preparation Collection Resources (24)

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Becoming a Leader through Action Research: Building Open Education Practice in the School Library
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The role of the school librarian is evolving from keeper of library materials to leader in school reform. The digital age has elevated  information literacy from the mechanics of searching and finding to thinking and inquiry. To meet this challenge the library facility is reconceptualized as a learning environment and the collection as a dynamic process of curation and access. Library staff, including paraprofessionals, student peers, and parent volunteers are viewed as instructional support. Allocated budgets are supplemented by funding sources such as grants and donations. The school librarian, trained in Action Research, can realize the library as learning center as she systematically collects evidence, sets priorities, and constructs a Strategic Plan. This module brings together the processes of action research, including identifying a problem in practice, formulating a research question, collecting and analyzing data to conduct a Community Scan and School Library Needs Assessment. She will apply her findings to building a Strategic Plan that will transform the school library into a learning center, or improve its existing functions.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Module
Author:
carol gordon
Building Classroom Questioning Skills Through Lesson Modeling
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In this module, middle and high school teachers explore a model inquiry-based STEM social justice lesson involving statistics and its implementation to understand the role of questioning techniques in delivering inquiry-based lessons, building depth of knowledge and understanding student thinking. In this module, teachers will:-- Evaluate their own questioning skills-- Report, monitor and reflect on their own questioning skills-- Learn new questioning skills while gaining exposure to an inquiry-based, social justice STEM lesson-- Understand the role of questioning skills in building student exposure to Depth of Knowledge levels 3/4 level thinking

Material Type:
Module
Author:
Lauren Provost
Cognitive STEAM: Environments
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This segment expands the role of library services and spaces in alternative K-12 curriculum. Using STEAM as a model for our discussion, we will review learning styles and how to plan libraries to complement pedagogy. Prior to taking the course you should review student learning styles and multiple intelligence theory. To incorporate all learners into our discussions on space we will look beyond STEM to STEAM including art and design into the process as well. We will investigate a future school library influenced by cognitive research, learning styles and pedagogy. The primary goal in the course is to give educators alternative concepts for educational space design that focuses on pedagogy and the individual learner.

Material Type:
Module
Author:
Margaret Sullivan
Creating librarian-teacher partnerships: Roles of school principals and school librarians
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This module offers school principals and school librarians the opportunity to build and strengthen understanding and skills toward collaborative instruction with the school librarian and classroom faculty. This module is also appropriate for graduate candidates in school leadership and/or school librarian programs.This module is based on the British University learning model. In England, Small groups of learners meet once a week with a "tutor" - AKA professor to discuss relevant topics, share their work, submit assignments and get feedback. While the faculty suggests resources, learners are expected to conduct research to find their own. This model is especially applicable to school library and school principal candidates who need to build research skills for on-going professional development in the field. Librarians, of course, always need to hone their research skills.Like the British model, learning for this program is largely self-guided. Resources are provided for the learner to develop expertise demonstrated in three major assignments: a white paper, a tri-fold pamphlet, and an analysis of a case study.Candidates must demonstrate and justify competence in targeted ISLLC and ALA Standards to successfully complete the module. This competence is assessed by a rubric used by the candidate for self-assessment and by faculty for performance assessment .Because the learning for this module is largely self-guided, faculty needs to be available for consultation through regularly scheduled office hours and email. The goal of this consultation is to provide coaching and explanation. Faculty will use the Discussion Board Task as formative assessment to guide facilitated instruction and coaching. Summative assessment is demonstrated by the three artifacts produced in the module.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Ann Spencer
Curriculum Curation
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No Strings Attached
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Collection development, a foundational component of the library program, is the formal, professional process of selecting, with the aid of appropriate evaluation tools and knowledge of the school, comprehensive and balanced materials  to meet the diverse needs of the community.Rather than using a comprehensive and balanced acquisitions procedure, curriculum curation is a tightly targeted selection process to meet the knowledge and/or cognitive goals of instruction in service of student learning.  Rather than generalized pointers to resources, curation will identify a specific section or element within each resource. Therefore, curriculum curation requires co-planning with faculty and using professional discernment, adding value to the chosen resources.  Dialogue between librarian and instructor must be part of the curation process In order to surface student learning goals. Such negotiated curation shines a light on the expertise that each educator brings to the conversation about the thinking tasks and relevant experiences that will augment student learning. This module scaffolds and models curating an interdependent set of OER sources and tools to support the instructional core of a unit.Granite State Learning Outcomes3.    Demonstrate the ability to facilitate developmentally appropriate and challenging learning experiences based on the unique needs of each learner (and) make the discipline(s) accessible and meaningful for learners;6.    Design and implement instructional strategies that engage students’ interests and develop their ability to: inquire; think both critically and creatively; and ethically gain and share knowledge;15.  Complete a narrative reflection on the course and personal growth.AASL CompetenciesAASL Standard 1.2 a: Implement the principles of effective teaching and learning that contribute to an active, inquiry-based approach to learning.AASL Standard 1.2 b: Make use of a variety of instructional strategies and assessment tools to design and develop digital-age learning experiences and assessments in partnership with classroom teachers and other educators.AASL Standard 1.3 a: Model, share, and promote effective principles of teaching and learning as collaborative partners with other educators.AASL Standard 1.4 c: Integrate the use of technologies as a means for effective and creative teaching and to support P-12 students' conceptual understanding, critical thinking and creative processes.PSEL Standard 4 a:  Implement coherent systems of curriculum, instruction, and assessment that promote the mission, vision, and core values of the school, embody high expectations for student learning, align with academic standards, and are culturally responsive.PSEL Standard 4 e:  Promote the effective use of technology in the service of teaching and learning. 

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Debbie Abilock
Guiding the Inquiry: Using the Information Search Process
Conditions of Use:
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Guided Inquiry (GI), also known as the Information Search Process (ISP), is a research-based model for teaching information-based inquiry through the collaboration of the school librarian and classroom teacher. A Powerpoint presentation WITH NOTES divides the module into three sections: 1) How do we learn? describes constructivist learning theory developed by Piaget, Dewey, Bruner, Kelly, and Vygotsky and the research on why students plagiarize.2) The centerpiece for this section is the Information Search Process, a staged model that guides information users through Task Initiation, Exploration, Topic Selection, Focus Formulation, Collection of Information, Presentation, and Assessment. The ISP takes a multi-dimensional approach to learning that includes thoughts, feelings, and actions of the information user as they progress through these stages. This section also includes authentic learning tasks as the context for the ISP. 3) Interventions. Since the model is research-based, it is predicative. School librarians can anticipate confusion, frustration, and information behaviors such as selecting information that indicate successful or unsuccessful progression through the ISP stages. The concept of intervention is critical to Guided Inquiry as the school librarian, in collaboration with the classroom teacher, diagnoses the problem and provides an intervention that enables the information user to move from one stage to the next. The goal of this module is to familiarize students with ISP stages, provide print and digital tools for each of the ISP stages, Each section of the module has a learning task for students that requires them to apply what they have learned.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Module
Author:
carol gordon
IMLS Fellowship Course
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In this course we will look at ways to change the narrative on school libraries from questioning the need for them or how to renovate the industrial era models of a single, shared resource environment to a learner-centered model.  We will work on how to move beyond traditional concepts, personal biases and even past current Learning Commons and Maker Spaces to creating learning environments where resources are ubiquitously accessible to students in virtual and physical formats.    We will look at the enormous complexity of this model in a K-12 school and why not exploring unique, alternative concepts may be hastening the elimination of school librarians.

Subject:
Applied Science
Material Type:
Full Course
IMLS Fellowship Course, Creating Alternative School Library Environments
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In this course we will look at ways to change the narrative on school libraries from questioning the need for them or how to renovate the industrial era models of a single, shared resource environment to a learner-centered model.  We will work on how to move beyond traditional concepts, personal biases and even past current Learning Commons and Maker Spaces to creating learning environments where resources are ubiquitously accessible to students in virtual and physical formats.    We will look at the enormous complexity of this model in a K-12 school and why not exploring unique, alternative concepts may be hastening the elimination of school librarians.

Subject:
Applied Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
IMLS Fellowship Course, Creating Alternative School Library Environments, Creating Alternative School Library Environments
Conditions of Use:
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Introduction to the CourseThis module will introduce students to the overall goals of the course, contextualizing the creation of alternative library spaces within two key movements currently seeking to transform library spaces:  Learning Commons and MakerSpaces. Students will be asked to begin reflecting on the complex factors which are involved in successful planning and implementiation of transformative solutions in their school library settings.Two suggestions for a final project for the course are: Project Have each student document where they believe their library is in its evolution of change, explain how its current environment is supporting inquiry for students in their school today.  Then using tools from the course develop a plan for obtaining the information needed to project into the future what their school library and school could be in the next 10 years.   Develop a persuasive argument to present to school administrators why resources should be allocated to initiate the plan.  How could the plan improve student learning, enrich instruction and support the mission of the school?   How would the physical space and your role within it change?Alternative ProjectYour district is launching a new STEM Charter Middle School in the next year.  Initially there is no plan for a library in the Charter School; it will be a one-to-one environment, large studio style learning environments, extensive access to technology, and planners have decided a library is too“traditional” and unnecessary in the new building.   Consider the educational model, the curriculum, the diversity of instructors and students and why the district has approved this concept for new construction.  You believe strongly that the new school needs the inquiry based skills a librarian can provide and ask for the opportunity to present an alternative library concept to the board.  The school board gives you six months to research, compile data, and you have access to the original concept team of educators and the school design team as you plan.   Prepare your presentation for the board. 

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Margaret Sullivan
IMLS Fellowship Course, Creating Alternative School Library Environments, Leveraging Virtual Reality in a School Library
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The module asks students to think beyond their current experiences in school libraries.  We will look at content that is not specific to school, yet it will be the basis for discussions about how it might apply in future school library environments. You will ask your students to "think out of the box" for the moment then consider those futurist ideas when planning a space for today while knowing the space  should be flexible enough to accommodate futuristic possibilities. 

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Margaret Sullivan
IMLS Fellowship Course, Creating Alternative School Library Environments, Planning for Humans: User-Based Design
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Module 5 Planning for Humans, Users-based DesignUser based design is so logical and widely talked about today that it can be overlooked in designing alternative school library spaces.  It is ultimately what this course is about.  We have discussed current solutions to the issue of what a school library should be, such as a Learning Commons.  We have learned how to work around biases that can stifle creative, alternative solutions. We have looked at alternative tools to use when considering or planning space.  Students have diagramed the trajectories that need to be considered in new library space, have overlaid those considerations with improvisational and dimensional elements.   In this module we will bring all these pieces together and plan a space that will work in students' individual school settings at this point in time based on the needs of their users.  However, those needs will not be fixed. Thinking you can design a space today for an extended period of time can not be your goal.  Library space must have a multiplicity of trajectories.  You must design for current user needs. Provide tools to build their base knowledge while watching down the road for the next information explosion, the tools it will require and decide how it will impact user needs.  Leadership is really your goal.  Adapting the space that users need to be successful is merely a an ongoing task.  

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Margaret Sullivan
IMLS Fellowship Course, Creating Alternative School Library Environments, Planning for Innovation: Renaissance or Renovation
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In the third module we will consider tools for students to use to plan new school library spaces.  This module along with Module 4 will expose students to structured ways to develop new ideas for not just renovating space but taking it in new directions.   These modules are transitional, a way to move toward renaissance rather than mere renovation.  Hopefully, they will provide a framework to explore ideas beyond their experience and the experiences of other planning team members.  After critically evaluating the advantages and limitations of either a Learning Commons or a Maker Space and considering futuristic ideas, let’s focus on what might be an interim solution.  What might be an affordable alternative that school libraries could be considering to enrich progressive, alternative educational models?   We need to consider how to embed inquiry into new learning models while maximizing the space, the resources and the mentoring skills of a trained librarian. The goal of Modules 3 and 4 are to provide students with objective ways to step away from their preconceived library space designs and think about new concepts based on the user.   We have moved space planning from a focus on housing the physical content to planning around the learning activities such as collaboration or team projects.  The next logical step is to take a humanistic approach; planning for users. 

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Margaret Sullivan
IMLS Fellowship Course, Creating Alternative School Library Environments, Tell a Story and Add Immersive Planning
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In this module we are going to look at an alternative way of thinking about environmental change.  It is another tool to move the group toward alternative space planning.  We are first going to explore the work of Doreen Massey, her thoughts on the multiplicity of space and how we are blinded by focusing on your single slice of time and function within a space.  In what should appeal to all librarians, Massey talks about space as “a story, a narrative” that is continually being written. We will also explore an “Immersive Planning” concept that Knoll Furniture has introduced into office and university space planning.  The concept works equally as well in the school library environment but is currently not being leverage there.  The process recognizes that space boundaries are becoming unclear because of the way users want to work.  Defining a space with a single purpose has lost its functionality in today’s world, or as Massey states space is a “multiplicity of trajectories”.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Margaret Sullivan
Instructional Leadership - Learner variability
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Knowledge of learners and learning is an essential priority for Library Media Specialists. As the demand for meeting the needs of all learners increases, LMSs are uniquely positioned to observe and support learners across the range of their strengths and challenges. Not only are they able to provide a variety of resources for gathering, processing, and producing information, LMSs are often afforded the opportunity to observe learner strengths that may go overlooked in classroom settings.Personalizing learning is a shift from facilitating implementation of a curricular program to developing a repertoire of instructional resources and strategies to support learner variability. In bridging the disciplines of information and learning, the LMS stays abreast of developments in each, curating and accessing exceptional OER materials and integrating evidence-based mind, brain, and education science (MBES). This module will take a look at the concept and science of learner variability, and investigate and apply two models for designing instruction for learner variability. Students are asked to build on their knowledge of Guided Inquiry Process (see Resources) and OER materials to leveraging learner profiles for effective instructional design.This unit specifically addresses NH ED 614.11.A.1.a and 614.11.A.1.b.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Kim Carter
Introduction to Technology Integration
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The goal of this module is to give teachers an overview of the basic considerations concerning integrating technology in the classroom to meet the needs of all learners.
Users:
Higher Education Instructors: This module could be integrated into a content area course or used as a mini course on technology integration.
Librarians: This module could be used as an in-service tool to introduce teachers to technology integration, library resources and how the librarian and teacher can work together to select, implement, and assess technology to enhance student learning.
Self-Paced Study: Anyone can work through the module at their own pace for professional development.

The goal of this module is to give teachers an overview of the basic considerations concerning integrating technology in the classroom to meet the needs of all learners.

The learner will assess their access to technology and their personal beliefs and attitudes about technology.
Learning Objectives

The learner will examine two models of technology integration.

TPACK - Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge

SAMR Model of Technology Integration

The Common Core Standards that are related to technology and digital media will be examined.

Learners will choose a common core standard that suggests using technology and/or digital sources of information and identify technology(s) that will support the standard and enhance the learning environment. The focus will be on selecting technology for the content area (TK and CK) and determine the level of SAMR addressed in the application of the technology

Learners will reflect on best practices for maximizing using technology

Learners will use a technology evaluation rubric to evaluate a technology tool selected to meet a specific learning goal.

Learners will examine the important considerations regarding ethical and safe use of technology and Internet use.

Learners will examine and evaluate the “Privacy Policy” of two educational game companies.

Learners will develop a Technology Integration Professional Development Plan that will include their areas of need and a timeline and resources (network/PLC).

Subject:
Educational Technology
Elementary Education
Higher Education
Special Education
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Paula Lombardi
Leadership Essentials:  School Librarians and OER  - How will you lead your school? Making the Leap.
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The School Librarian Program at Granite State College is based on the foundational belief that school librarians are essential, integral and transformational leaders.  The program focuses on preparing school librarians as catalysts for school change and learning for the digital age.  In addition to developing the requisite skill sets and knowledge base needed to perform at top levels, there is a focus on the development of dispositions and attitudes such as initiative, creativity, self-direction, resilience, flexibility and intellectual curiosity which are crucial in assisting learning communities to engage in continuous improvement, innovation and reflective practice.  The program emphasizes the convergence of these dispositions,  skills, knowledge and understandings in order for candidates to achieve and succeed with a strategic plan for schools to ramp up and redesign school library media programs to provide the requisite, robust environment and intentional opportunities for meaningful student engagement with content, ideas, information and technology.This module is intended to be completed over the course of a 12-week semester and is designed to develop understanding about becoming a more effective school library leader within the evolving contexts of the digital age – especially related to the assessment of leadership dispositions and competencies needed to ramp up and redesign school library programs to provide the robust, flexible environments and intentional opportunities for meaningful student and teacher engagement with OER content, ideas, information and technology. The module addresses five areas of focus — preparation (2 weeks), planning (2 weeks), organizational strategy and change (3 weeks), transformational learning (3 weeks) and reflection/synthesis (2 week).

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Susan Ballard
Library Design: Incorporating Student and Faculty voice through Design Thinking
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Often library or learning commons spaces are designed or redesigned without significant input from customers(i.e. students, teachers, or librarians).  Including student voice in design helps activates students' sense of engagement and teaches problem solving skills.  Libraries are increasingly coming to recognize that including student voice in library policies and library design is not only good for students as learners, but also good for building strong and collaborative library-student relationships.  As outlined in the U.S. Department of Education's Future Ready Librarians framework,  the role of the librarian as a facility planner means that the librarian needs to engage in best practices around gathering "client" information and empowering clients as "owners" of the space.   The framework also recognizes the role of librarians in inspiring students as creators. This one week course will introduce library school students and school administrators to methods for incorporating student and teacher input into a library design project.  A core part of the module includes introducing library students to the Design Thinking Process as a vehicle for more customer-centered design.  Students will then create their own activities for gathering student or faculty input.  A variety of inspiring readings on libraries and design from both inside of OER Learning Commons, Creative Commons licensed materials, and other sources will be utilized as well as materials introducing the Design Thinking Process. Objectives:Through example, lecture, and practice students will become familiar with the Design Thinking Process and begin to use it as a method for solving library design challenges.Students will be able to identify how the Design Thinking Process interviews contribute to empathy and lead to more user centered design.Students will experience using principle of open learning to build a library environment that is inviting to all.Students will work collaboratively, modeling the collaborative work they want their future students to engage in.

Subject:
Information Science
Higher Education
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Carolyn Foote
School Librarians Collaborating with STEM Classroom Teachers : Developing a Visual Model
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This module is part of the Foundations of School Librarianship on using web resources to enhance collaboration between STEM classroom teachers and school librarians, with special emphasis on STEM subjects. The module is built around the understanding and use of data to support classroom projects. The module describes a process by which the school librarian and teacher will collaborate on a high school-level project to explore how to find, evaluate, and use data to produce an infographic. Infographics are increasingly important as a vehicle for explaining complex subjects. They are a wonderful blend of data and information to create meaning and new knowledge. This module is intended as a 'stretching' exercise for school librarians who often have scant background in STEM. The skills learned by school librarian students revolve around identifying data sources, developing evaluative skills, translating data into an infographic, and working with classroom teachers in STEM subject to match resources with teacher identified learning goals. 

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Patricia Erwin-Ploog
Teaching Infographics as Multiliteracy Arguments
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From "The Spectrum of Apple Flavors" to "We are all Zebras: How Rare Disease is Shaping the Future of Healthcare," we find colorful visual displays of information and data used to persuade, inform and delight their audience-readers. Most infographic assignments result in loose collections of related facts and numbers, essentially a collage or poster. Student create displays of unrelated factoids and spurious data correlations and they "ooh" and "ahhh" at beautiful nothings. However, the visual and textual elements of an infographic can culminate in a coherent multimodal argument which prompts inquiry in the creator and the audience.  In order to teach infographics as a claim expressed through visual metaphor, supported by reasoning with evidence in multiple modes, instructors employ a sequence of interventions to invoke the relevant skills and strategies at appropriate moments.  Composing and critiquing infographics can enhance understanding of both the content and rhetoric, since people analyze, elaborate and critique information more deeply when visual and textal modes are combined (Lazard and Atkinson 2014).This pedagogy of reading and writing multiple literacies can be adapted to other multimodal products. For an overview, refer to "Recipe for an Infographic" (Abilock and Williams 2014) which is also listed in the references for this module. We recommend that you experience this process yourself as you teach it to students.   

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Debbie Abilock