Game-Based Learning

In game play, the progress a player makes is through learning. This happens as students grasp and understand embedded knowledge and skills required to successfully navigate a new system. The challenge and the progress of understanding a new concept through gaming is what makes a game enjoyable. What do you want the students to learn? Educational game-play has defined learning outcomes. Keep this notion central to your planning when choosing or designing a game. Be sure students are appropriately challenged because a learner's knowledge, understanding and skills can quickly bypass the educational benefit of a game!
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Game-Based Learning Collection Resources (116)

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Ayiti: The Cost of Life
Conditions of Use:
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Help the Guinard family struggle to make ends meet and get ahead in their poverty-stricken homeland, Haiti. In this sometimes tragic and always challenging simulation game, you help the parents, Jean and Marie, and their children, Patrick, Jacqueline, and Yves, make decisions about work, education, community building, personal purchases, and health care that might brighten their future. Includes lesson plans for teachers.

Subject:
World Cultures
Sociology
Material Type:
Game
Provider:
TakingITGlobal
Provider Set:
TakingITGlobal TIGed Activities
Be a Movie Director -- Game
Conditions of Use:
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Find the right vehicles for a new movie from the America on the Move collection, then watch the movie that you’ve created on the big screen. See how much you know about the history of transportation with the interactive games in this online collection. You can find information, artifacts and photographs in the collection as well.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Material Type:
Game
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
Smithsonian Institution
Provider Set:
National Museum of American History
Author:
Project Director
Steven Lubar
Bingo! Using Environmental Print to Practice Reading
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The game Bingo is transformed in this lesson in which students use symbols and images to make connections to environmental print through the use of personalized Bingo cards.

Subject:
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Provider Set:
ReadWriteThink
Building Phonemic Awareness With Phoneme Isolation
Conditions of Use:
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Students improve phonemic awareness through games and chants that help them isolate beginning and ending sounds and connect them with their written symbols (graphemes)

Subject:
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Provider Set:
ReadWriteThink
Carbon Cycle Game
Conditions of Use:
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The carbon cycle game is a short digital game that helps you teach how carbon atoms move through various forms including soils, the ocean, plant and animal life and fossil fuels. Actions such as photosynthesis, plant and animal death and forest fires all convert carbon from one form into another. This is a card style game. It allows for single or multi players. Runs on a browser.

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Game
Provider:
University of Wisconsin
Provider Set:
The Yard Games
Chemical Symbols Game
Rating

A free game-based learning resource for practicing the chemical symbols of the Periodic Table of Elements. The game includes the first 92 elements on the periodic table.

Material Type:
Game
Interactive
Author:
STEM Sheets
Chemistry Games: Chirality
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Play a game and find out about a Nobel Prize awarded discovery or work! The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2001 concerns work with chiral molecules. These chiral molecules can be used to control or speed up different chemical reactions. In this game you can learn the basic principles of chirality.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Game
Reading
Simulation
Provider:
Nobel Foundation
Provider Set:
Nobelprize.org
Chemistry Games: Conductive Polymers
Conditions of Use:
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Play a game and find out about a Nobel Prize awarded discovery or work! We have been taught that plastics, unlike metals, do not conduct electricity. Plastic is used as insulation around the copper wires in ordinary electrical cables. Yet, the 2000 Nobel Laureates in Chemistry: Alan Heeger, Alan G. MacDiarmid and Hideki Shirakawa, were rewarded for their revolutionary discovery that plastic can, after certain modifications, be made electrically conductive.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Game
Reading
Simulation
Provider:
Nobel Foundation
Provider Set:
Nobelprize.org
Chemistry Games: PCR Method
Conditions of Use:
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Rating

Play a game and find out about a Nobel Prize awarded discovery or work! PCR is a method by which a few fragments of DNA can be duplicated into millions in a couple of hours. This makes PCR a very useful method in forensic science, as it means that very small amounts of DNA could be enough to identify a person. PCR was invented by Kary Mullis, one of two Nobel Laureates in Chemistry in 1993. If you play the game below, you will be able to learn more about PCR!

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Game
Reading
Simulation
Provider:
Nobel Foundation
Provider Set:
Nobelprize.org
Chemistry Games: Plastics
Conditions of Use:
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Rating

Play a game and find out about a Nobel Prize awarded discovery or work! For thousands of years people have been using silk, wool, cotton, wood and leather. In the last century or so, we have added plastics to this list. Key to developing the plastics we now use were the discoveries made by the Nobel Prize awarded scientists Ziegler and Natta in the 1950s. There are two major groups of plastics - some melt when heated and others don't. Find out why!

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Game
Reading
Simulation
Provider:
Nobel Foundation
Provider Set:
Nobelprize.org
Code Fred: Survival Mode
Rating

Incredible phenomena are happening in your body all the time. But have you ever stopped to think about what keeps you breathing, how information travels from your senses to your brain instantly, or any of the other amazing things that constantly happen to keep you alive? Now you can jump inside the human body and participate in these physiological processes to help Fred outrun danger in the woods.

In Code Fred: Survival Mode, you'll play mini-games to send adrenaline to help Fred run faster, build a blood clot to help heal a wolf bite, prioritize energy intake to the most critical organs, and even fight bacteria invaders after Fred gets sneezed on in the woods. Each mini-game helps Fred run a little farther toward safety. Lose one of these challenges, and Fred's body won't be leaving the woods.

Subject:
Anatomy/Physiology
Nutrition
Material Type:
Game
Provider:
Museum of Science and Industry
Provider Set:
Individual Authors
Cosmic Connections
Conditions of Use:
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Rating

This OLogy activity challenges kids to match up cosmic photos with their descriptions in an interactive quiz. The activity begins by introducing kids to the Hubble Space Telescope through an astronomer at the museum who works with photos from the telescope. They are then asked to match eight telescope photos with their text descriptions. A Help screen is included with tips for completing the activity. Once kids have made their guesses, they can click a button to check their answers. They are prompted to try again if not all their answers are correct. Success is rewarded with a congratulatory message from the Hubble.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Assessment
Provider:
American Museum of Natural History
Provider Set:
American Museum of Natural History