Iowa K-12 E-Curriculum

AEA K-12 E-Curriculum features content developed by AEA Learning Online and partnering Iowa educators for Iowa schools to use in their classrooms. This curated collection focuses on text-based lessons, specifically made with the SoftChalk Cloud platform.

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Iowa K-12 E-Curriculum Collection Resources (278)

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100 Free Web Tools for Elementary Teachers
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This article includes the URL and description of 100 free web tools that can be used by all teachers. The tools are categorized into search engines, math and science, games, templates and lesson plans, and more.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Ohio State University College of Education and Human Ecology
Provider Set:
Beyond Penguins and Polar Bears: An Online Magazine for K-5 Teachers
Author:
John Costilla
Date Added:
10/17/2014
"1500 Doomed":  People's Press  Reports on the Gauley Bridge Disaster
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The deadly lung disease silicosis is caused when miners, sandblasters, and foundry and tunnel workers inhale fine particles of silica dust--a mineral found in sand, quartz, and granite. In 1935, approximately 1,500 workers--largely African Americans who had come north to find work--were killed by exposure to silica dust while building a tunnel in Gauley Bridge, West Virginia. Ordinarily, silicosis takes a several years to develop, but these West Virginia tunnel workers were falling ill in a matter of months because of exposure to unusually high concentrations of silica dust. The crisis over silicosis suddenly became a national issue, as seen in this article in the radical newspaper Peoples' Press . In 1936 congressional hearings on the Gauley Bridge disaster, it was revealed that company officials and engineers wore masks to protect themselves when they visited the tunnel, but they failed to provide masks for the tunnelers themselves, even when the workers requested them.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Reading
Provider:
American Social History Project / Center for History Media and Learning
Provider Set:
Many Pasts (CHNM/ASHP)
Author:
Center for History and New Media/American Social History Project
Date Added:
04/25/2013
19th Century Women: Struggle and Triumph
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Ever wonder what women were doing during the 1800s or what is known as the antebellum period of United States history? Men are well represented in our history books as they were the powerful, educated leaders of our country. Women, on the other hand, rarely had opportunities to tell their stories. Powerful stories of brave women who helped shape the history of the United States are revealed to students through journals, letters, narratives and other primary sources. Synthesizing information from the various sources, students write their impressions of women in the Northeast, Southeast, or the West during the Nineteenth Century.

Subject:
U.S. History
Women's Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
LOC Teachers
Date Added:
03/27/2007
3 - Nuclear Change
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In the Nuclear Change unit, students will learn about nuclear change through examining the phenomena of radon. Three questions that students will answer at the end of the unit are:  is air we breathe in buildings radioactive and what is Radon and how does it affect health? First, student will investigate what is radon. Next, students will build a atom to learn how atoms can exist in stable and unstable isotopes. Students learn about types of radiation and then complete an inquiry about half-life of atoms. Half lifes can be used to map geology and assess danger timelines. Next, students learn how nuclear change occurs through fusion or fission. Additionally, students learn that the high energy released has military/commercial uses, and the legacy of cosmic, geologic and human events and activities has impacted where radioactivity exists on the earth. Students end the unit with a cumulative Socratic seminar about Hanford while assessing risk and benefits of using nuclear reactions and recovering sites contaminated by radioactive materials is complex. At the end of the unit students discuss the following question: should parts of the Hanford Nuclear Reservation be opened as a recreation area or returned to Native Americans?

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Portland Metro STEM Partnership
Provider Set:
NGSS Chemistry
Date Added:
08/02/2018
4 C's Activity for Biology Cancer
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This is an extension activity after discussing cancer or lead into discussing about student choices. Essential QuestionsStudents will be able to to describe behaviors lead to skin cancer and how can it be prevented.Students will be able to explain the risk and reward behaviors.  

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Educational Technology
Life Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Doug Mossengren
Date Added:
06/21/2018
53a. McCarthyism
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No Strings Attached
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Senator Joseph McCarthy rose to national prominence by initiating a probe to ferret out communists holding prominent positions. During his investigations, safeguards promised by the Constitution were trampled.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
US History
Date Added:
12/03/2014
5.NF Cornbread Fundraiser
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No Strings Attached
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This is a task from the Illustrative Mathematics website that is one part of a complete illustration of the standard to which it is aligned. Each task has at least one solution and some commentary that addresses important aspects of the task and its potential use.

Subject:
Ratios and Proportions
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Illustrative Mathematics
Provider Set:
Illustrative Mathematics
Author:
Illustrative Mathematics
Date Added:
08/06/2015
"The A-Bomb Won't Do What You Think!": An Argument Against Reliance on Nuclear Weapons
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For four years after the U.S. dropped atom bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki to end World War II, America held a monopoly on the production of atomic weapons. During this period, debate centering on the use of nuclear bombs in future wars proliferated among government officials, scientists, religious leaders, and in the popular press. In the following article from Collier's, former Navy lieutenant commander William H. Hessler, using data from the Strategic Bombing Survey, argued that saturation bombing of urban areas during World War II, while devastating for civilians, did not achieve war aims. A future atomic war, therefore, might well destroy cities but fail to stop enemy aggression. Furthermore, with a much higher urban concentration than the Soviet Union, the U.S. had more to lose from atomic warfare. The article, while providing detailed explanations of the bomb's destructive capability, demonstrated the lack of information available regarding the long-term medical and ecological effects of radioactivity. Hessler's prose also evoked both the fascination that gadgetry of atomic warfare held for Americans of the time and the fear many felt about the risks involved in putting this technology to use. On September 24, 1949, one week after publication of this article, news that the Russians had conducted atom bomb tests shocked the nation. The following April, a National Security Council report to President Harry S. Truman advised development of a hydrogen bomb--some 1,000 times more destructive than an atom bomb--and a massive buildup of non-nuclear defenses. The subsequent outbreak of war in Korea in June 1950 justified to many a substantial increase in defense spending.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Reading
Provider:
American Social History Project / Center for History Media and Learning
Provider Set:
Many Pasts (CHNM/ASHP)
Author:
Center for History and New Media/American Social History Project
Date Added:
04/25/2013
AP Computer Science Activity: Chalk Talk - Why Do We Create Instances Of Classes?
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A modified version of a Chalk Talk routine in which the educator provides a prompt for students to put forth ideas, questions, and further develop ideas of others in an effort to advance understanding in relation to a topic.

Subject:
Educational Technology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Justin Lewis
AP Computer Science Activity: Claim-Support-Question - Enhancing Classes - Interface Design and Implementation
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This activity utilizes a Claim-Support-Question framework that allows students to draw on prior knowledge, investigation, and questioning. Designed to be placed within a Java context of enhancing object-oriented programming classes using interfaceses, students will analyze, implement, and support claims regarding three separate interfaces while moving between analysis and program implementation.

Subject:
Educational Technology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Justin Lewis
AP Computer Science Activity: I Used To Think, Now I Think:
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This activity is utilized as a method for students to commuincate their current learning, progress their understanding, and then reflect on their current understanding of a topic and share what they now think and the connections they have built.

Subject:
Educational Technology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Justin Lewis
Accessing Complex Text Through Structured Conversations
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In this lesson students use a structured format (an adaptation of Think-Pair-Share) to discuss and deconstruct complex text. The new core standards emphasize the importance of developing students' speaking and listening skills as well as helping them access complex text through reading, re-reading, re-thinking, and re-examining.The purpose of this lesson is to get the students to focus and stay on topic while they talk. As a result, students are required to think more extensively about a topic by repeatedly reading and discussing with others.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Utah Education Network
Date Added:
08/12/2013
Action Is Character: Exploring Character Traits with Adjectives
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Students must "become" a character in a novel in order to describe themselves and other characters using powerful adjectives.

Subject:
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Provider Set:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
09/25/2013
Activity: "Unpacking Standards"
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This can be an activity to use with your colleagues in assessing your unit design with the new Iowa Social Studies standards or with students as an intro (or closing) activity for a "Atlantic Revolutions" unit. A teacher could use SS-WH.9-12.14. Compare various systems of government, such as monarchies, democracies/republics, empires, and dictatorships, and their methods of maintaining order and/or control.SS-WH.9-12.23. Critique primary and secondary sources of information with attention to the source of the document, its context, accuracy, and usefulness of sources throughout world historySS-WH.9-12.20. Evaluate methods used to change or expand systems of power and/or authority.or choose from: https://iowacore.gov/sites/default/files/k-12_socialstudies.pdf 

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Mark Augspurger
An Affecting Scene In Kentucky
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A racist attack on Democratic vice-presidential candidate Richard M. Johnson. The Kentucky Congressman's nomination, in May 1835, as Van Buren's running-mate for the 1836 election raised eyebrows even among party faithful, because of Johnson's common-law marriage to a mulatto woman, Julia Chinn, by whom he fathered two daughters. The artist ridicules Johnson's domestic situation, and the Democrats' constituency as well. Seated in a chair with his hand over his face, a visibly distraught Johnson lets a copy of James Watson Webb's "New York Courier and Enquirer" fall to the floor and moans, "When I read the scurrilous attacks in the Newspapers on the Mother of my Children, pardon me, my friends if I give way to feelings!!! My dear Girls, bring me your Mother's picture, that I may show it to my friends here." On the right are his two daughters, Adaline and Imogene, wearing elegant evening dresses. One presents a painting of a black woman wearing a turban, and says, "Here it is Pa, but don't take on so." The second daughter says, "Poor dear Pa, how much he is affected." A man behind them exclaims, "Pickle! Pop!! and Ginger!!! Can the slayer of Tecumseh be thus overcome like a summer cloud! fire and furies. oh!" Johnson is reported to have slain the Indian chief Tecumseh. Flanking Johnson are a gaunt abolitionist (right) and a black man. The abolitionist holds a copy of the "Emancipator," a Hartford, Connecticut newspaper, and says, "Be comforted Richard; all of us abolitionists will support thee." The black man pledges, ". . . de honor of a Gentlemen dat all de Gentlemen of Colour will support you." On the far left is a stout postmaster who says, "Your Excellency, I am sure all of us Postmasters and deputies will stick to you; if you promise to keep us in office." The print seems to date from early in the campaign of 1836. Johnson's wife Julia Chinn died in 1833. Adaline, one of the two daughters pictured, died in February 1836. Although Weitenkampf dates the print at 1840, when Johnson was again Van Buren's running-mate, the presence of both daughters and the drawing style are persuasive evidence for an 1836 date.|Probably published by Henry R. Robinson, New York.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 63.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1836-15.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
Algebra I Module 4: Polynomial and Quadratic Expressions, Equations, and Functions
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In earlier modules, students analyze the process of solving equations and developing fluency in writing, interpreting, and translating between various forms of linear equations (Module 1) and linear and exponential functions (Module 3). These experiences combined with modeling with data (Module 2), set the stage for Module 4. Here students continue to interpret expressions, create equations, rewrite equations and functions in different but equivalent forms, and graph and interpret functions, but this time using polynomial functions, and more specifically quadratic functions, as well as square root and cube root functions.

Subject:
Algebra
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
09/17/2013
Alliteration in Headline Poems
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Students will be introduced to the term alliteration and create a headline poem consisting of 25 words that contain at least three examples of alliteration.

Subject:
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Provider Set:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
09/25/2013