National Geographic

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22. Social Change and National Development
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
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The United States changed dramatically in its first half century. In 1776 the U.S. consisted of thirteen colonies clustered together on the eastern seaboard. By 1821 eleven new states had been added from Maine to Louisiana. This geographic growth and especially the political incorporation of the new states demonstrated that the United States had resolved a fundamental question about how to expand. This growth not only built upon the Louisiana Purchase, but included military intervention in Spanish Florida which the United States then claimed by treaty in 1819.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
US History
Date Added:
12/03/2014
Art and Ecology
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Artists are often particularly keen observers and precise recorders of the physical conditions of the natural world. As a result, paintings can be good resources for learning about ecology. Teachers can use this lesson to examine with students the interrelationship of geography, natural resources, and climate and their effects on daily life. It also addresses the roles students can take in caring for the environment. Students will look at paintings that represent cool temperate, warm temperate, and tropical climates.
In this lesson students will: Identify natural resources found in particular geographic areas; Discuss ways in which climate, natural resources, and geography affect daily life; Apply critical-thinking skills to consider the various choices artists have made in their representations of the natural world; Make personal connections to the theme by discussing ways they can be environmental stewards; Identify natural resources found in particular geographic areas; Discuss ways in which climate, natural resources, and geography affect daily life; Apply critical-thinking skills to consider the various choices artists have made in their representations of the natural world; Make personal connections to the theme by discussing ways they can be environmental stewards.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Visual Arts
Ecology
Physical Geography
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Gallery of Art
Date Added:
02/16/2011
British Columbia in a Global Context
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This first year Geography textbook takes a holistic approach to Geography by incorporating elements of physical, human and regional geography, as well as bringing in methods and perspectives from spatial information science.. This textbook applies a fundamental geographical approach to understanding our globally changing world by looking at local processes which are linked to larger global processes and events. For example mining and its effects are a global issue and we can see how these unfold in BC. A further example is the recent apology to First Nation peoples on the residential school treatment, as similar events occur in the US, Ireland and Australia. Processes of urbanization, a phenomenon which people all over the globe are experiencing, can be seen in Vancouver with our discussion of the city’s development. Geography students, indeed all first year students, need to be able to critically assess their own contexts and environments in order to properly engage with our continually globalizing world.

Subject:
Physical Geography
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
BCcampus
Provider Set:
BCcampus Faculty Reviewed Open Textbooks
Author:
Arthur Green
Aviv Ettya
Britta Ricker
Cristina Tenemos
Simon Fraser
Siobhan McPhee
Date Added:
10/31/2014
Can We Feed the Growing Population?
Rating

In this lesson, students explore the resources that make up our agricultural system. Students examine land uses and soil quality through graphs of land use and crop production and use computational models to compare the effect of different management strategies on the land. At the end of the lesson, students are able to describe how humans can maintain and replenish important resources to be able to produce food long into the future.

Subject:
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Unit of Study
Author:
National Geographic Society
Date Added:
09/11/2019
Challenge: Robots! Educator Guide
Rating

Use this educator guide to engage students in Grades 3-10 with Challenge: Robots! game in a variety of settings, both in and out of the classroom.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
National Geographic Society
Date Added:
09/18/2019
Challenges in Global Geospatial Analytics
Conditions of Use:
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How would you like to travel to new places while collaborating on a geospatial data challenge with students from around the world? In this class, students collaborate on a global-scale geospatial analysis problem with a focus on data analytics and professional practice in Geographic Information Systems. Penn State MGIS students collaborate with graduate students from ITC - University of Twente in Enschede, Netherlands to develop solutions to analyze spatio-temporal patterns in refugee migration data. Students have the opportunity to present their work and develop new connections with EU geospatial professionals via site visits to European national mapping agencies. Students work in teams to use geospatial analytics to arrive at a solution to visualize patterns over space and time.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Penn State's College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (http
Penn State University
Provider Set:
// e-education.psu.edu/oer/)
Author:
Beth King
Fritz Kessler
Date Added:
10/07/2019
Civics, Foundations of Government
Rating

Social Studies Targets:Forms of governmentNature/Purposes of governmentIdeologies of governmentComparative governmentEconomic systems and governmentLearning Targets:Understand how the world is organized politically and nations interact (civics)Identify the differences in philosophy, structure, and the nature of different types of government (civics)Understand the role of sovereignty in the development of different governments and within governments (civics)Compare and contrast democracies with other forms of government.(civics)Understand individual rights and their accompanying responsibilities including problem solving and decision making at the local, state, and international level. (civics)Understand how cultural forces and factors influenced and were influenced by changes in government (Cultural Geography)Identify ways that power can be distributed geographically within a state (Physical Geography)Identify the different types of economic systems (Economics)Understand how different government and economic systems influence one another (Economics)Students will recognize and analyze the ideologies inherent in different economic systems. (Economics)

Subject:
Social Science
Political Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Color Variation over Time in Rock Pocket Mouse Populations
Rating

This activity provides an introduction to natural selection and the role of genetic variation by asking students to analyze illustrations of rock pocket mouse populations (dark/light fur) on different color substrates in the Sonoran Desert (light/dark) over time. Based on this evidence, and what they learn about variation and natural selection in the accompanying short film, students use this evidence to explain the change in the rock pocket mouse populations on the lava flow (dark substrate) over time. This is one of several classroom activities, focusing on related topics and varying in complexity, built around the short film. This ten minute film shows adaptive changes in rock pocket mouse populations, demonstrating the process of natural selection and can be accessed at http://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/making-fittest-natural-selection-and-adaptation. The film is also available as an interactive video with embedded questions, which test students’ understanding as they watch the film.

Subject:
Genetics
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Howard Hughes Medical Institute
National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)
Provider Set:
NGSS@NSTA
Author:
Mary Colvard
Date Added:
10/12/2015
Contemporary Literature: Literature, Development, and Human Rights, Spring 2008
Conditions of Use:
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Rating

Subject focuses on fiction, drama, and poetry and possibly films inspired by these topics mostly of the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Brouillette, Sarah
Date Added:
01/01/2008
Cultural Intelligence
Conditions of Use:
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GEOG 571 explores the relationships between culture and civil security and the process of geographically analyzing social, political, economic, and demographic information to understand human history, institutions, and behaviors. It is an elective course in the Geospatial Intelligence Certificate, the Intercollege Master of Professional Studies (iMPS-HLS), and the Master of Geographic Information Systems degree program that is offered exclusively through Penn State's World Campus. It is also one of the optional capstone courses that leads to Penn State's Postbaccalaureate Certificate in GIS. The course consists of projects, associated readings, and exams.

Subject:
Cultural Geography
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Penn State University
Provider Set:
Penn State's College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (http:// e-education.psu.edu/oer/)
Author:
George Van Otten
Date Added:
09/18/2018
Dust to Dust: The Carbon Cycle
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Tom and his grandfather, a retired high school chemistry teacher, are talking about a National Geographic television documentary titled "Waking the Baby Mammoth." As students read the dialogue that ensues, they learn how carbon, an essential element of life, is transformed from carbon dioxide to carbohydrate to animals, then back to carbon dioxide. The case emphasizes a number of chemistry concepts, including atomic structures, carbon isotopes, radiocarbon dating, beta decay, half-life, and photosynthesis. Developed as a supplement to the nuclear chemistry chapter in a non-majors general chemistry course, the case could also be used in an introductory botany, paleobiology, plant, or general ecology course after students have completed at least one semester of general chemistry.

Subject:
Education
Life Science
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Chemistry
Material Type:
Case Study
Provider:
National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science
Provider Set:
Case Study Collection
Author:
Diane R. Wang
Jennifer Y. Anderson
Ling Chen
Date Added:
01/01/2010
ELA Grade 5 Earth A Fine Balance
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Lesson OverviewThis lesson introduces students to the theme, Earth-A Fine Balance, by exploring the multiple meanings of the word “balance” in an effort to develop an understanding of the unit title and the essential question.  Students will set up a Field Journal for their routine writing experiences, including but not limited to, learned information and reflections of how the readings relate to the unit theme.  Students will participate in learning centers once they have set up their field journals.  Students will participate in reading an adapted article from The National Geographic Almanac, 2013.  Students will participate in a vocabulary learning center as well as have an opportunity to explore the natural environment outside.Teacher Planning, Examples of Response Methods and MaterialsSee Full Lesson Plan AttachedEssential Question and NCSC Essential UnderstandingWhen nature interacts, what happens to the harmony, or balance, among animals, plants, and people? 

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Richard Schmidt
Earth Exploration Toolbook Chapter: Water Availability
Conditions of Use:
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DATA: North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR). TOOL: FieldScope GIS. SUMMARY: Use an online GIS from the National Geographic Society, to investigate the relationship between precipitation, evaporation, and surface runoff.

Subject:
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Mathematics
Chemistry
Hydrology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Earth Exploration Toolbook: Step-by-Step Guides for Investigating Earth System Data
Date Added:
11/02/2014
Economic Forces in American (U.S.) History
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

History teaches us that properous advanced national economies like the U.S. share a common institutional framework conducive to creativity, production, and exchange. That institutional framework of individual freedom, rule of law, clearly stated rights to private property, and open competitive markets shapes incentives to encourage material advance. The multiple perspectives approach to historical-scholarship requires viewing events, trends, and developments through a variety of analytical lenses. Often overlooked in traditional history curricula are the insights that the economic way of thinking adds to social, political, and geographic perspectives. Emphasizing the role of institutions, Economic Forces in American History looks at the impact of seven key forces in shaping the development of the United States.

Subject:
U.S. History
Economics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Foundation for Teaching Economics
Date Added:
07/16/2012
Experiencing Film: Classroom Strategies for Engaging Learners
Rating

The Experiencing Film curriculum guide is a resource for using film in experiential ways to teach content, concepts, and skills, to provide relevance, to meet the learning needs of all students, and to extend the learning process beyond the classroom walls.

Experiencing Film promotes the following teaching strategies and practices, which are woven throughout the curriculum.

Reflective Practices
Inquiry-based Learning
Cooperative Learning
The Study of Place as a Framework for Learning
Project-based Learning

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
National Geographic Society
Date Added:
09/11/2019
Geographic Alliance of Iowa
Rating

The Geographic Alliance of Iowa (GAI) was established in 1991 with the support of the National Geographic Society (NGS). GAI is composed of K-12 teachers, college and university professors, personnel from a variety of other educational endeavors, and citizens, all of who are concerned with improving geographic instruction in Iowa. As the only entity in Iowa specifically devoted to geography education, the mission of the Geographic Alliance of Iowa (GAI) is to help ensure K-12 graduates are geographically literate citizens. To achieve this mission, the GAI provides resources and expertise to improve the geographic literacy of Iowa students. With a particular focus on K-12 education, including pre-service teachers, the GAI provides exemplary professional development opportunities that follow accepted best practices and offers a clearinghouse of accessible, high quality, standards-based curricular materials.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Physical Geography
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Date Added:
05/08/2017
Geographic Foundations of Geospatial Intelligence
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A good detective or researcher like Sherlock Holmes knows the fundamental questions that need to be answered to gather facts to solve a problem. So how does geospatial intelligence contribute to answering these questions? While geospatial technology is useful in revealing who, what, when, and where events take place, it is less useful in explaining why events occur. However, geospatial intelligence analysis leverages geographic information science and technology with the intelligence tradecraft to develop products that support decision-making in national and homeland security, law enforcement, emergency management, and international relief efforts. GEOG 882 will challenge you to think critically, consider alternative viewpoints, and question your own assumptions when analyzing why human events occur over place and time.

Subject:
Information Science
Communication
Physical Geography
Cultural Geography
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Penn State's College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (http
Penn State University
Provider Set:
// e-education.psu.edu/oer/)
Author:
Mark Corson
Date Added:
10/07/2019
Global Literacy Survey
Rating

The Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) and National Geographic commissioned a survey to gauge what young people educated in American colleges and universities know about geography, the environment, demographics, U.S. foreign policy, recent international events, and economics. The survey, conducted in May 2016 among 1,203 respondents aged eighteen to twenty-six, revealed significant gaps between what young people understand about today’s world and what they need to know to successfully navigate and compete in it. Included on site is the full survey report (PDF) and a sample quiz of some of the survey questions.

Subject:
World History
Physical Geography
Cultural Geography
Political Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Author:
Council on Foreign Relations
National Geographic
Date Added:
12/21/2017
Grand Teton National Park Created
Rating

On February 26, 1929, Grand Teton National Park, in northwestern Wyoming, was created. 

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Lecture
Author:
National Geographic Society
Date Added:
09/16/2019
The Great Energy Debate
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The National Geographic Society's global energy debate lesson plan explores the controversial issues surrounding the energy debate in the United States. Students will research recent initiatives being taken in this area and analyze their implications. They will then assume the roles of pivotal stakeholders in this debate and testify to a mock congressional committee responsible for making decisions about public lands and energy resources. This Starting Point website describes the learning goals and context of use of this exercise. It also provides teaching notes, a list of necessary teaching materials, assessment hints and additional resources.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Chemistry
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Reading
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Starting Point (SERC)
Starting Point: Teaching Entry Level Geoscience
Author:
Rebecca Teed
Date Added:
02/16/2011
In the Mountains of New Mexico
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

At age twenty-seven, physicist Philip Morrison joined the Manhattan Project, the code name given to the U.S. government's covert effort at Los Alamos to develop the first nuclear weapon. The Manhattan Project was also the most expensive single program ever financed by public funds. In this video segment, Morrison describes the charismatic leadership of his mentor, J. Robert Oppenheimer, and the urgency of their mission to manufacture a weapon 'which if we didn't make first would lead to the loss of the war." In the interview Morrison conducted for War and Peace in the Nuclear Age: 'Dawn,' he describes the remote, inaccessible setting of the laboratory that operated in extreme secrecy. It was this physical isolation, he maintains, that allowed scientists extraordinary freedom to exchange ideas with fellow physicists. Morrison also reflects on his wartime fears. Germany had many of the greatest minds in physics and engineering, which created tremendous anxiety among Allied scientists that it would win the atomic race and the war, and Morrison recalls the elaborate schemes he devised to determine that country's atomic progress. At the time that he was helping assemble the world's first atomic bomb, Morrison believed that nuclear weapons 'could be made part of the construction of the peace.' A month after the war, he toured Hiroshima, and for several years thereafter he testified, became a public spokesman, and lobbied for international nuclear cooperation. After leaving Los Alamos, Morrison returned to academia. For the rest of his life he was a forceful voice against nuclear weapons.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Economics
Political Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
WGBH Open Vault
Date Added:
02/26/1986
Invasive Species: The Nation's Invasive Species Information System
Conditions of Use:
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The United States Government's Invasive Species website is the gateway to Federal efforts concerning invasive species. On this site users can learn about the impacts of invasive species and the Federal government's response, as well as read select species profiles and find links to agencies and organizations dealing with invasive species issues. This is also the website for the National Invasive Species Council, which coordinates Federal responses to the problem. Users can access geographically specific information on invasive species, a variety of databases, labs and regulations and the Federal management plan. Invasivespecies.gov provides a wealth of information on domestic invasive species.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Biology
Ecology
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Starting Point (SERC)
Date Added:
10/23/2006
Is there Life in Space?
Rating

Students discover how scientists find planets and other astronomical bodies. They compare zones of habitability around different star types, discovering the zone of liquid water possibility around each star type and they explore how scientists use spectroscopy to learn about atmospheres on distant planets. Students will explain how scientists find distant planets and moons and how they determine whether those astronomical bodies could be habitable.    

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Module
Unit of Study
Author:
National Geographic Society
Date Added:
09/11/2019
Lesson 1 1850-1874 The Nebraska Kansas-Act
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This lesson is part of a larger collection of lessons developed by NET - Nebraska Studies project work and accompany website. To see all of the lessons use the keyword search "Nebraska Studies".

Summary
Lesson 1 has a variety of activities and materials related to The Nebraska Kansas Act.

There are a variety of activities and materials that can be used with students of various grade levels. All of these items are tied to the NET Nebraska Studies Timeline materials which are shown and linked throughout the lesson. Teachers are not intended to use all of the contents within this lesson but to pick which activities or materials they would prefer to use with their students depending on the teachers needs. Most of the materials are shown within the lesson and/or have external links to the content or other content which may be helpful to the lesson's activities or materials.

Subject:
History
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Reading
Unit of Study
Author:
Debe Dockhorn
Date Added:
12/17/2018
Lesson 2 Native Americans & Settlers
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This lesson is part of a larger collection of lessons developed by NET - Nebraska Studies project work and accompany website. To see all of the lessons use the keyword search "Nebraska Studies".

Lesson 2 has a variety of activities and materials related Native Americans and Settlers within Nebraska from 1850 - 1874.

There are a variety of activities and materials that can be used with students of various grade levels. All of these items are tied to the NET Nebraska Studies Timeline materials which are shown and linked throughout the lesson. Teachers are not intended to use all of the contents within this lesson but to pick which activities or materials they would prefer to use with their students depending on the teachers needs. Most of the materials are shown within the lesson and/or have external links to the content or other content which may be helpful to the lesson's activities or materials.

Subject:
History
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Reading
Unit of Study
Author:
Dorann Avey
Date Added:
08/30/2018
Lesson 3  1850-1874 African American Settlers
Conditions of Use:
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Overview: This lesson is part of a larger collection of lessons developed by NET - Nebraska Studies project work and accompany website. To see all of the lessons use the keyword search "Nebraska Studies".

Lesson 3 has a variety of activities and materials related African American Settlers in Nebraska from 1850 - 1874.

There are a variety of activities and materials that can be used with students of various grade levels. All of these items are tied to the NET Nebraska Studies Timeline materials which are shown and linked throughout the lesson. Teachers are not intended to use all of the contents within this lesson but to pick which activities or materials they would prefer to use with their students depending on the teachers needs. Most of the materials are shown within the lesson and/or have external links to the content or other content which may be helpful to the lesson's activities or materials.

Subject:
History
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Reading
Unit of Study
Author:
Debe Dockhorn
Date Added:
12/17/2018
Mapping Your State and Community
Rating

This activity introduces Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and poses questions that help students answer questions that require spatial data. Students examine questions about communities and populations from local to state to national scales. Six GIS, math and mapping activities are identified in this resource. This resource is from PUMAS - Practical Uses of Math and Science - a collection of brief examples created by scientists and engineers showing how math and science topics taught in K-12 classes have real world applications.

Subject:
Engineering
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
NASA
Provider Set:
NASA Wavelength
Date Added:
11/05/2014
Mapping our Changing World
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

Whether you realize it or not, when you carry a smart phone, use a navigation system in your car, or look up the nearest coffee shop on your computer, you are using geographic information. Geographic data and technologies are embedded in almost all aspects of our lives. GEOG 160, Mapping Our Changing World, explores what geographic information and data are, what makes them unique, how they are created, and how we use them. You'll explore how geographic technologies like geographic information systems (GIS), remote sensing from satellites, and global positioning systems (GPS) work together to provide us with information we rely on. You'll also become an informed consumer of the geographic content in your life.

Subject:
Physical Geography
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Penn State's College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (http
Penn State University
Provider Set:
// e-education.psu.edu/oer/)
Author:
Jennifer Smith Mason
Joshua Stevens
Raechel Bianchetti White
Ryan Baxter
Date Added:
10/07/2019
Maps and Microbes
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Mapping the spread of a disease is no trivial task. Using maps from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the United Nations Progromme on AIDS (UNAIDS), we can look for patterns of spread and test hypotheses about disease causation at the population level. We can contrast the spread of current outbreaks like West Nile virus to that of the epidemic spread of influenza in 1918. Geographical Information Systems (GIS) prove to be a powerful tool for analyzing local disease outbreaks as well. * analyze maps of an outbreak and epidemiological data to characterize the disease at the population level

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
BioQUEST Curriculum Consortium
Provider Set:
Microbes Count!
Author:
Amy Sapp
Janet Vigna
Marion Fass
Date Added:
05/20/2006
National Geographic Society
Rating

This 10-minute documentary tells the story of Marie Wilcox, the last fluent speaker of the Wukchumni language and the dictionary she created in an effort to keep her language alive.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Languages
World Cultures
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lecture Notes
Lesson
Author:
National Geographic Society
Date Added:
09/11/2019
Native American Cultures Across the U.S.
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This lesson discusses the differences between common representations of Native Americans within the U.S. and a more differentiated view of historical and contemporary cultures of five American Indian tribes living in different geographical areas. Students will learn about customs and traditions such as housing, agriculture, and ceremonial dress for the Tlingit, Dinè, Lakota, Muscogee, and Iroquois peoples.

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEments
Date Added:
09/06/2019
Natural Selection
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

The concept of interdependence in an ecosystem and its effect on the evolution of populations is further explored through a model of a dam. Students build a dam in the middle of the field, dividing the ecosystem in half to illustrate the affects of geographic isolation. They watch as the grass and then the rabbit populations in that region shift to one variant in the population. When students remove the dam, they observe the ecosystem slowly return to its original state.

Subject:
Life Science
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Data Set
Diagram/Illustration
Interactive
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Concord Consortium
Provider Set:
Concord Consortium Collection
Author:
The Concord Consortium
The National Science Foundation
Date Added:
12/11/2011
Ocean Currents and Sea Surface Temperature
Rating

This interactive tool allows students to gather data using My NASA Data microsets to investigate how differential heating of Earth results in circulation patterns in the oceans and the atmosphere that globally distribute the heat. They examine the relationship between the rotation of Earth and the circular motions of ocean currents and air. Students also make predictions based on the data to concerns about global climate change. They begin by examining the temperature of ocean’s surface currents and ocean surface winds. These currents, driven by the wind, mark the movement of surface heating as monitored by satellites. Students explore the link between 1) ocean temperatures and currents, 2) uneven heating and rotation of Earth, 3) resulting climate and weather patterns, and 4) projected impacts of climate change (global warming). Using the Live Access Server, students can select data sets for various elements for different regions of the globe, at different times of the year, and for multiple years. The information is provided in maps or graphs which can be saved for future reference. Some of the data sets accessed for this lesson include Sea Surface Temperature, Cloud Coverage, and Sea Level Height for this lesson. The lesson provides directions for accessing the data as well as questions to guide discussion and learning. The estimated time for completing the activity is 50 minutes. Inclusion of the Extension activities could broaden the scope of the lesson to several days in length. Links to informative maps and text such as the deep ocean conveyor belt, upwelling, and coastal fog as needed to answer questions in the extension activities are included.

Subject:
Atmospheric Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
NASA
National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)
Provider Set:
NGSS@NSTA
Date Added:
10/12/2015
Prairie
Rating

Prairies are enormous stretches of flat grassland with moderate temperatures, moderate rainfall, and few trees. When people talk about the prairie, they are usually referring to the golden, wheat-covered land in the middle of North America.

Subject:
Biology
Ecology
Physical Geography
Material Type:
Lecture Notes
Module
Reading
Author:
National Geographic Society
Photograph Kyle Moderhak Myshot
Date Added:
09/16/2019
Preservation of the West
Conditions of Use:
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During the late 1800s, American industry's demand for more and more natural resources pushed Congress to recognize the need to explore and chart the geological characteristics and mineral wealth of the country. In 1864, William Brewer (seen third from the left in "Field Party of 1864"), chief botanist of the California Geological Survey, led the first state-sponsored expedition to survey, map, chart, document, and photograph vast, previously unexplored areas of California. The government sponsored several such expeditions to survey and map the territories of the United States. The many photographs taken on these expeditions were used to promote the geographic wonders and scenic beauty of the West to the rest of the country and led to a move to preserve areas of natural beauty and protect them against development. In 1871, photographer William H. Jackson traveled to Yellowstone with an expedition led by Ferdinand V. Hayden, a Civil War veteran and later head of the US Geological Survey (the USGS was officially established in 1879). Jackson took the stereoscopic views of the park included here. The following year, as a result of this expedition, Congress passed the Yellowstone Act of 1872 to protect over 2 million acres in northwest Wyoming, designating the Yellowstone area as the world?s first National Park. In California, naturalist and conservationist John Muir (shown seated on a boulder in one photograph) educated and informed the public about the beauty of the state and its need to be preserved. He was instrumental in the move to set aside Yosemite as a National Park. Muir was influential in convincing President Teddy Roosevelt of the need to conserve these lands. One photograph of the president's visit to Yosemite shows Muir and Roosevelt standing on a rock at Yosemite's Glacier Point. Another shows Roosevelt with a party of Secret Service men and government officials at Mariposa Grove. Carlton Watkins was among the first to photograph Yosemite. He became well known for his magnificent, large plate images of the park, including the images of Bridal Veil, El Capitan, and Nevada Fall, shown here. His images played a significant role in promoting the West to the rest of the country. An image of sheet music from 1873 called "Yosemite Waltzes" reflects how the park was quickly incorporated into popular culture. The logging industry, which began during the Gold Rush years, had gained a foothold in California and the Pacific Northwest. One 1872 photograph depicts loggers in Mammoth Forest about to cut down a massive tree (said to be 5,000 years old) that would later be reassembled for the World's Fair in order to show the rest of the world just how big things were in the West. But as logging and other industries grew, and it became clear that the West had a finite amount of natural wealth, the conservation movement gained momentum. In 1892, the Sierra Club began at the University of California, Berkeley, to promote conservation and involve people in the great outdoors by organizing hikes and outings. One photograph shows club members on an outing in Sequoia Forest in 1902. Other photographs picture two women hiking to Glacier Point, and a family camping in Yosemite in 1906.

Subject:
World Cultures
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
University of California
Provider Set:
Calisphere - California Digital Library
Date Added:
04/25/2013