National Geographic

76 affiliated resources

National Geographic Collection Resources (76)

View
Selected filters:
22. Social Change and National Development
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

The United States changed dramatically in its first half century. In 1776 the U.S. consisted of thirteen colonies clustered together on the eastern seaboard. By 1821 eleven new states had been added from Maine to Louisiana. This geographic growth and especially the political incorporation of the new states demonstrated that the United States had resolved a fundamental question about how to expand. This growth not only built upon the Louisiana Purchase, but included military intervention in Spanish Florida which the United States then claimed by treaty in 1819.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
US History
African Bone Tools Dispute Key Idea About Human Evolution
Rating

This site from National Geographic details a study that argues, based on the bone tools and other recent discoveries, that "behavioral modernity" first evolved in Africa and has a much longer history than most archaeologists believe. The study uses bone tools more than 70,000 years old as evidence that modern behavior evolved before humans migrated to Europe.

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Starting Point: Teaching Entry Level Geoscience
Author:
National Geographic News
Africa's Imperiled Rock Art Documented Before it Disappears
Rating

This National Geographic article discusses the importance of ancient African rock art and the threats these ancient works face. There is also a link to a book of images compiled by photographer David Coulson in his extensive travels across Africa in search of African rock art.

Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Starting Point: Teaching Entry Level Geoscience
Author:
David Braun
National Geographic News
Aftermath in Santa Cruz
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

By watching this National Geographic video, you will learn about the earthquake that struck Santa Cruz, Chile on February 27, 2010. You will see how the 8.8 magnitude earthquake caused an apartment building in this small city to collapse.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
SMARTR
Provider Set:
SMARTR: Virtual Learning Experiences for Youth
Antarctica Gives Mixed Signals on Warming
Rating

This article from National Geographic News investigates trends in the Antarctic Ice Cap that seem to give contradictory information about global warming. The results of various studies do not seem useful in predicting future climate development for the rest of the planet.

Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Starting Point: Teaching Entry Level Geoscience
Author:
Bijal P. Trivedi
National Geographic News
Art and Ecology
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Artists are often particularly keen observers and precise recorders of the physical conditions of the natural world. As a result, paintings can be good resources for learning about ecology. Teachers can use this lesson to examine with students the interrelationship of geography, natural resources, and climate and their effects on daily life. It also addresses the roles students can take in caring for the environment. Students will look at paintings that represent cool temperate, warm temperate, and tropical climates.
In this lesson students will: Identify natural resources found in particular geographic areas; Discuss ways in which climate, natural resources, and geography affect daily life; Apply critical-thinking skills to consider the various choices artists have made in their representations of the natural world; Make personal connections to the theme by discussing ways they can be environmental stewards; Identify natural resources found in particular geographic areas; Discuss ways in which climate, natural resources, and geography affect daily life; Apply critical-thinking skills to consider the various choices artists have made in their representations of the natural world; Make personal connections to the theme by discussing ways they can be environmental stewards.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Visual Arts
Ecology
Physical Geography
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Gallery of Art
Author's Sahara Trek Inspired by Classic Tale
Rating

This National Geographic interview recounts Dean King's rediscovery of Captain James Riley's classic survival narrative, and his subsequent journey tracking Riley's footprints across Saharan sands. After reading the adventure, King decided to travel to what is today the Morocco-controlled territory of Western Sahara to retrace Riley's route.

Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Starting Point: Teaching Entry Level Geoscience
Author:
Mark Kirby
National Geographic News
Ballard Team Has High Hopes for Deep-Water Robot
Rating

This National Geographic article describes Hercules, an innovative underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV) equipped with mechanical arms, fingers, and a variety of tools. The robot will be used to conduct the first archaeological excavations of shipwrecks and archaeological sites in the deep seas of the Mediterranean and the Black Sea.

Subject:
Oceanography
Archaeology
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Starting Point: Teaching Entry Level Geoscience
Author:
Brian Handwerk
National Geographic News
British Columbia in a Global Context
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This first year Geography textbook takes a holistic approach to Geography by incorporating elements of physical, human and regional geography, as well as bringing in methods and perspectives from spatial information science.. This textbook applies a fundamental geographical approach to understanding our globally changing world by looking at local processes which are linked to larger global processes and events. For example mining and its effects are a global issue and we can see how these unfold in BC. A further example is the recent apology to First Nation peoples on the residential school treatment, as similar events occur in the US, Ireland and Australia. Processes of urbanization, a phenomenon which people all over the globe are experiencing, can be seen in Vancouver with our discussion of the city’s development. Geography students, indeed all first year students, need to be able to critically assess their own contexts and environments in order to properly engage with our continually globalizing world.

Subject:
Physical Geography
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
BCcampus
Provider Set:
BCcampus Faculty Reviewed Open Textbooks
Author:
Arthur Green
Aviv Ettya
Britta Ricker
Cristina Tenemos
Simon Fraser
Siobhan McPhee
Can Iron-Enriched Oceans Thwart Global Warming?
Rating

This article from National Geographic News addresses the possibility of adding iron to ocean systems in order to improve phytoplankton growth, which would remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and decrease global warming via increased photosynthesis.

Subject:
Life Science
Atmospheric Science
Chemistry
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Starting Point: Teaching Entry Level Geoscience
Author:
John Roach
National Geographic News
Challenges in Global Geospatial Analytics
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This class will focus on data analytics and professional practice in Geographic Information Systems. Students will participate in a collaborative data challenge project to engage with graduate students on a global-scale geospatial analysis problem. Penn State MGIS students will collaborate with graduate students from ITC - University of Twente located in Enschede, Netherlands to develop solutions to analyze spatio-temporal patterns in refugee migration data. Students will have the opportunity to present their work and develop new connections with EU geospatial professionals via site visits to European national mapping agencies. Students will work in teams to tackle this global-scale data set, and use geospatial analytics to arrive at a solution to visualize patterns over space and time.

Subject:
Physical Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Pennsylvania State University
Provider Set:
Penn State, College of EMS
Author:
Beth King and Fritz Kessler
Changing Communities: Past vs. Future
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This lesson plan introduces students to changes that have occurred in western North Carolina, through two hundred years of national and regional development. Students will learn about the geographical, political, and technological issues that have influenced change in mountain communities using oral histories by Madison County residents. They will learn about the history of road building in the North Carolina mountains, and the relatively recent decision to connect two halves of interstate highway in Madison County. They will compare and contrast the negative and positive changes that road construction has brought to the region, and listen to oral histories of locals who have experienced both good and bad effects. Through discussion with classmates, they will create a list of the advantages and disadvantages of both tradition and development. After collecting and reviewing information about the construction of Interstate 26 through Madison County, students will write an editorial. In this editorial, students will clearly state their position on the Interstate 26 debate, and will support their argument with evidence from the oral histories.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture
Lesson Plan
Provider:
UNC University Library
Provider Set:
Stories of the American South
Civics, Foundations of Government
Rating

Social Studies Targets:Forms of governmentNature/Purposes of governmentIdeologies of governmentComparative governmentEconomic systems and governmentLearning Targets:Understand how the world is organized politically and nations interact (civics)Identify the differences in philosophy, structure, and the nature of different types of government (civics)Understand the role of sovereignty in the development of different governments and within governments (civics)Compare and contrast democracies with other forms of government.(civics)Understand individual rights and their accompanying responsibilities including problem solving and decision making at the local, state, and international level. (civics)Understand how cultural forces and factors influenced and were influenced by changes in government (Cultural Geography)Identify ways that power can be distributed geographically within a state (Physical Geography)Identify the different types of economic systems (Economics)Understand how different government and economic systems influence one another (Economics)Students will recognize and analyze the ideologies inherent in different economic systems. (Economics)

Subject:
Social Science
Political Science
Political Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Craigslist and the Economy: Predicting Unemployment and Foreclosure Trends from Online Classified Advertisements
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

In this paper we present findings of an experimental study of Craigslist.org involving nearly 4 million raw online classified advertisements to infer key economic indicators. First, we investigate the potential of using Craigslist information to predict the state of the national and local economy by analyzing user behavior and posting trends in some key categories. We show that the number of posts for jobs available/wanted reflects the actual trends reported by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. We examine the potential of predicting unemployment and home foreclosure rates from online classified advertisements in geographically localized peer production communities. We show that there is a strong correlation between the number of houses posted for sale, the number of jobs available/wanted and the actual state of the local and national economy. Finally, we analyze job posts in 32 categories and day to day changes and conclude the “recession proof jobs” and jobs highly affected by the recent economic meltdown.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
Connexions
Author:
Ziyad Aljarboua
Desert-Adapted Crocs Found in Africa
Rating

This National Geographic site details the discovery of several small communities of crocodiles living on the southern edge of Africa's Sahara in desert conditions. The desert crocodiles have apparently adapted to the changing environment in northern Africa; 8,000 to 10,000 years ago, what is now desert was probably lush savannah and grasslands.

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Starting Point: Teaching Entry Level Geoscience
Author:
Hillary Mayell
National Geographic News
Digital Mapping and Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Geographic information systems (GIS), once used predominantly by experts in cartography and computer programming, have become pervasive in everyday business and consumer use. This unit explores GIS in general as a technology about which much more can be learned, and it also explores applications of that technology. Students experience GIS technology through the use of Google Earth on the environmental topic of plastics in the ocean in an area known as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. The use of this topic in GIS makes the unit multidisciplinary, incorporating the physics of ocean currents, the chemistry associated with pollutant degradation and chemical sorption to organic-rich plastics, and ecological impact to aquatic biota.

Subject:
Engineering
Physical Geography
Material Type:
Full Course
Unit of Study
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Andrey Koptelov
Nathan Howell
Dust to Dust: The Carbon Cycle
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Tom and his grandfather, a retired high school chemistry teacher, are talking about a National Geographic television documentary titled "Waking the Baby Mammoth." As students read the dialogue that ensues, they learn how carbon, an essential element of life, is transformed from carbon dioxide to carbohydrate to animals, then back to carbon dioxide. The case emphasizes a number of chemistry concepts, including atomic structures, carbon isotopes, radiocarbon dating, beta decay, half-life, and photosynthesis. Developed as a supplement to the nuclear chemistry chapter in a non-majors general chemistry course, the case could also be used in an introductory botany, paleobiology, plant, or general ecology course after students have completed at least one semester of general chemistry.

Subject:
Education
Life Science
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Chemistry
Material Type:
Case Study
Provider:
National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science
Provider Set:
Case Study Collection
Author:
Diane R. Wang
Jennifer Y. Anderson
Ling Chen
Earth Exploration Toolbook Chapter: Water Availability
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

DATA: North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR). TOOL: FieldScope GIS. SUMMARY: Use an online GIS from the National Geographic Society, to investigate the relationship between precipitation, evaporation, and surface runoff.

Subject:
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Mathematics
Chemistry
Hydrology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Earth Exploration Toolbook: Step-by-Step Guides for Investigating Earth System Data