National Geographic

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National Geographic Collection Resources (40)

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22. Social Change and National Development
Conditions of Use:
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The United States changed dramatically in its first half century. In 1776 the U.S. consisted of thirteen colonies clustered together on the eastern seaboard. By 1821 eleven new states had been added from Maine to Louisiana. This geographic growth and especially the political incorporation of the new states demonstrated that the United States had resolved a fundamental question about how to expand. This growth not only built upon the Louisiana Purchase, but included military intervention in Spanish Florida which the United States then claimed by treaty in 1819.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
US History
Date Added:
12/03/2014
Art and Ecology
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Artists are often particularly keen observers and precise recorders of the physical conditions of the natural world. As a result, paintings can be good resources for learning about ecology. Teachers can use this lesson to examine with students the interrelationship of geography, natural resources, and climate and their effects on daily life. It also addresses the roles students can take in caring for the environment. Students will look at paintings that represent cool temperate, warm temperate, and tropical climates.
In this lesson students will: Identify natural resources found in particular geographic areas; Discuss ways in which climate, natural resources, and geography affect daily life; Apply critical-thinking skills to consider the various choices artists have made in their representations of the natural world; Make personal connections to the theme by discussing ways they can be environmental stewards; Identify natural resources found in particular geographic areas; Discuss ways in which climate, natural resources, and geography affect daily life; Apply critical-thinking skills to consider the various choices artists have made in their representations of the natural world; Make personal connections to the theme by discussing ways they can be environmental stewards.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Visual Arts
Ecology
Physical Geography
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Gallery of Art
Date Added:
02/16/2011
British Columbia in a Global Context
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This first year Geography textbook takes a holistic approach to Geography by incorporating elements of physical, human and regional geography, as well as bringing in methods and perspectives from spatial information science.. This textbook applies a fundamental geographical approach to understanding our globally changing world by looking at local processes which are linked to larger global processes and events. For example mining and its effects are a global issue and we can see how these unfold in BC. A further example is the recent apology to First Nation peoples on the residential school treatment, as similar events occur in the US, Ireland and Australia. Processes of urbanization, a phenomenon which people all over the globe are experiencing, can be seen in Vancouver with our discussion of the city’s development. Geography students, indeed all first year students, need to be able to critically assess their own contexts and environments in order to properly engage with our continually globalizing world.

Subject:
Physical Geography
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
BCcampus
Provider Set:
BCcampus Faculty Reviewed Open Textbooks
Author:
Arthur Green
Aviv Ettya
Britta Ricker
Cristina Tenemos
Simon Fraser
Siobhan McPhee
Date Added:
10/31/2014
Challenges in Global Geospatial Analytics
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How would you like to travel to new places while collaborating on a geospatial data challenge with students from around the world? In this class, students collaborate on a global-scale geospatial analysis problem with a focus on data analytics and professional practice in Geographic Information Systems. Penn State MGIS students collaborate with graduate students from ITC - University of Twente in Enschede, Netherlands to develop solutions to analyze spatio-temporal patterns in refugee migration data. Students have the opportunity to present their work and develop new connections with EU geospatial professionals via site visits to European national mapping agencies. Students work in teams to use geospatial analytics to arrive at a solution to visualize patterns over space and time.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Penn State University
Provider Set:
Penn State's College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (http:// e-education.psu.edu/oer/)
Author:
Beth King
Fritz Kessler
Date Added:
09/18/2018
Changing Communities: Past vs. Future
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This lesson plan introduces students to changes that have occurred in western North Carolina, through two hundred years of national and regional development. Students will learn about the geographical, political, and technological issues that have influenced change in mountain communities using oral histories by Madison County residents. They will learn about the history of road building in the North Carolina mountains, and the relatively recent decision to connect two halves of interstate highway in Madison County. They will compare and contrast the negative and positive changes that road construction has brought to the region, and listen to oral histories of locals who have experienced both good and bad effects. Through discussion with classmates, they will create a list of the advantages and disadvantages of both tradition and development. After collecting and reviewing information about the construction of Interstate 26 through Madison County, students will write an editorial. In this editorial, students will clearly state their position on the Interstate 26 debate, and will support their argument with evidence from the oral histories.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture
Lesson Plan
Provider:
UNC University Library
Provider Set:
Stories of the American South
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Civics, Foundations of Government
Rating

Social Studies Targets:Forms of governmentNature/Purposes of governmentIdeologies of governmentComparative governmentEconomic systems and governmentLearning Targets:Understand how the world is organized politically and nations interact (civics)Identify the differences in philosophy, structure, and the nature of different types of government (civics)Understand the role of sovereignty in the development of different governments and within governments (civics)Compare and contrast democracies with other forms of government.(civics)Understand individual rights and their accompanying responsibilities including problem solving and decision making at the local, state, and international level. (civics)Understand how cultural forces and factors influenced and were influenced by changes in government (Cultural Geography)Identify ways that power can be distributed geographically within a state (Physical Geography)Identify the different types of economic systems (Economics)Understand how different government and economic systems influence one another (Economics)Students will recognize and analyze the ideologies inherent in different economic systems. (Economics)

Subject:
Social Science
Social Science
Political Science
Political Science
Political Science
Political Science
Political Science
Political Science
Political Science
Political Science
Political Science
Political Science
Political Science
Political Science
Political Science
Political Science
Political Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Contemporary Literature: Literature, Development, and Human Rights, Spring 2008
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Subject focuses on fiction, drama, and poetry and possibly films inspired by these topics mostly of the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Brouillette, Sarah
Date Added:
01/01/2008
Cultural Intelligence
Conditions of Use:
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GEOG 571 explores the relationships between culture and civil security and the process of geographically analyzing social, political, economic, and demographic information to understand human history, institutions, and behaviors. It is an elective course in the Geospatial Intelligence Certificate, the Intercollege Master of Professional Studies (iMPS-HLS), and the Master of Geographic Information Systems degree program that is offered exclusively through Penn State's World Campus. It is also one of the optional capstone courses that leads to Penn State's Postbaccalaureate Certificate in GIS. The course consists of projects, associated readings, and exams.

Subject:
Cultural Geography
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Penn State University
Provider Set:
Penn State's College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (http:// e-education.psu.edu/oer/)
Author:
George Van Otten
Date Added:
09/18/2018
Dust to Dust: The Carbon Cycle
Conditions of Use:
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Rating

Tom and his grandfather, a retired high school chemistry teacher, are talking about a National Geographic television documentary titled "Waking the Baby Mammoth." As students read the dialogue that ensues, they learn how carbon, an essential element of life, is transformed from carbon dioxide to carbohydrate to animals, then back to carbon dioxide. The case emphasizes a number of chemistry concepts, including atomic structures, carbon isotopes, radiocarbon dating, beta decay, half-life, and photosynthesis. Developed as a supplement to the nuclear chemistry chapter in a non-majors general chemistry course, the case could also be used in an introductory botany, paleobiology, plant, or general ecology course after students have completed at least one semester of general chemistry.

Subject:
Education
Life Science
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Chemistry
Material Type:
Case Study
Provider:
National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science
Provider Set:
Case Study Collection
Author:
Diane R. Wang
Jennifer Y. Anderson
Ling Chen
Date Added:
01/01/2010
Earth Exploration Toolbook Chapter: Water Availability
Conditions of Use:
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DATA: North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR). TOOL: FieldScope GIS. SUMMARY: Use an online GIS from the National Geographic Society, to investigate the relationship between precipitation, evaporation, and surface runoff.

Subject:
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Mathematics
Chemistry
Hydrology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Earth Exploration Toolbook: Step-by-Step Guides for Investigating Earth System Data
Date Added:
11/02/2014
Economic Forces in American (U.S.) History
Conditions of Use:
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Rating

History teaches us that properous advanced national economies like the U.S. share a common institutional framework conducive to creativity, production, and exchange. That institutional framework of individual freedom, rule of law, clearly stated rights to private property, and open competitive markets shapes incentives to encourage material advance. The multiple perspectives approach to historical-scholarship requires viewing events, trends, and developments through a variety of analytical lenses. Often overlooked in traditional history curricula are the insights that the economic way of thinking adds to social, political, and geographic perspectives. Emphasizing the role of institutions, Economic Forces in American History looks at the impact of seven key forces in shaping the development of the United States.

Subject:
U.S. History
Economics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Foundation for Teaching Economics
Date Added:
07/16/2012
Effective Learning Strategies at Austin Community College, Beyond Academics, Chapter 15: Planning for Your Career
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The only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. Don’t settle.  –Steve Jobs, cofounder and CEO of AppleLEARNING OBJECTIVESBy the end of this section, you will be able to:Differentiate between “job” and “career”Explain the five-step process for choosing a careerList key strategies for selecting a college majorIdentify the relationship between college majors and career paths (both why they matter and why they don’t)Identify specific skills and transferable skills that will be valuable for your career path and how to acquire themDescribe the stages of career development and identify the stage you’re currently inIdentify sources for developing professional networksDefine the purpose and contents of an effective résumé and cover letterDescribe effective strategies to prepare for an interview

Subject:
Education
Higher Education
Material Type:
Module
The Forest: a collection of educational posters
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
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Forests - a living community is a collection of 20 free educational posters of forests. Teachers and students can use them for classroom discussions on various issues related to forests (environmental, geographical, historical, social and economic) and better understand their variety, role, resources and threats.
The colelction is an initiative of GoodPlanet Foundation in partnership with the French Ministry of National Education and the French Ministry of Ecology, Sustainable Development, Transport and Housing in order to celebrate the International Year of Forests, 2011.

Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
Good Planet
Author:
various
Date Added:
03/09/2011
Geographic Alliance of Iowa
Rating

The Geographic Alliance of Iowa (GAI) was established in 1991 with the support of the National Geographic Society (NGS). GAI is composed of K-12 teachers, college and university professors, personnel from a variety of other educational endeavors, and citizens, all of who are concerned with improving geographic instruction in Iowa. As the only entity in Iowa specifically devoted to geography education, the mission of the Geographic Alliance of Iowa (GAI) is to help ensure K-12 graduates are geographically literate citizens. To achieve this mission, the GAI provides resources and expertise to improve the geographic literacy of Iowa students. With a particular focus on K-12 education, including pre-service teachers, the GAI provides exemplary professional development opportunities that follow accepted best practices and offers a clearinghouse of accessible, high quality, standards-based curricular materials.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Physical Geography
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Date Added:
05/08/2017
Geographic Foundations of Geospatial Intelligence
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A good detective or researcher like Sherlock Holmes knows the fundamental questions that need to be answered to gather facts to solve a problem. So how does geospatial intelligence contribute to answering these questions? While geospatial technology is useful in revealing who, what, when, and where events take place, it is less useful in explaining why events occur. However, geospatial intelligence analysis leverages geographic information science and technology with the intelligence tradecraft to develop products that support decision-making in national and homeland security, law enforcement, emergency management, and international relief efforts. GEOG 882 will challenge you to think critically, consider alternative viewpoints, and question your own assumptions when analyzing why human events occur over place and time.

Subject:
Information Science
Communication
Physical Geography
Cultural Geography
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Penn State University
Provider Set:
Penn State's College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (http:// e-education.psu.edu/oer/)
Author:
Mark Corson
Date Added:
09/18/2018
Global Literacy Survey
Rating

The Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) and National Geographic commissioned a survey to gauge what young people educated in American colleges and universities know about geography, the environment, demographics, U.S. foreign policy, recent international events, and economics. The survey, conducted in May 2016 among 1,203 respondents aged eighteen to twenty-six, revealed significant gaps between what young people understand about today’s world and what they need to know to successfully navigate and compete in it. Included on site is the full survey report (PDF) and a sample quiz of some of the survey questions.

Subject:
World History
Physical Geography
Cultural Geography
Political Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Author:
Council on Foreign Relations
National Geographic
Date Added:
12/21/2017
The Great Energy Debate
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The National Geographic Society's global energy debate lesson plan explores the controversial issues surrounding the energy debate in the United States. Students will research recent initiatives being taken in this area and analyze their implications. They will then assume the roles of pivotal stakeholders in this debate and testify to a mock congressional committee responsible for making decisions about public lands and energy resources. This Starting Point website describes the learning goals and context of use of this exercise. It also provides teaching notes, a list of necessary teaching materials, assessment hints and additional resources.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Chemistry
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Reading
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Starting Point (SERC)
Starting Point: Teaching Entry Level Geoscience
Author:
Rebecca Teed
Date Added:
02/16/2011
In Sahara, Salt-Hauling Camel Trains Struggle On
Rating

This National Geographic site features an article about camel caravans that have, since the Middle Ages, navigated the Sahara Desert in search of salt. Caravans often numbering more than hundred still journey to the salt mines of Taudenni, 500 miles (800 kilometers) north of Timbuktu.

Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Starting Point: Teaching Entry Level Geoscience
Author:
Chris Rainier
National Geogaphic News
Date Added:
11/07/2014
In the Mountains of New Mexico
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

At age twenty-seven, physicist Philip Morrison joined the Manhattan Project, the code name given to the U.S. government's covert effort at Los Alamos to develop the first nuclear weapon. The Manhattan Project was also the most expensive single program ever financed by public funds. In this video segment, Morrison describes the charismatic leadership of his mentor, J. Robert Oppenheimer, and the urgency of their mission to manufacture a weapon 'which if we didn't make first would lead to the loss of the war." In the interview Morrison conducted for War and Peace in the Nuclear Age: 'Dawn,' he describes the remote, inaccessible setting of the laboratory that operated in extreme secrecy. It was this physical isolation, he maintains, that allowed scientists extraordinary freedom to exchange ideas with fellow physicists. Morrison also reflects on his wartime fears. Germany had many of the greatest minds in physics and engineering, which created tremendous anxiety among Allied scientists that it would win the atomic race and the war, and Morrison recalls the elaborate schemes he devised to determine that country's atomic progress. At the time that he was helping assemble the world's first atomic bomb, Morrison believed that nuclear weapons 'could be made part of the construction of the peace.' A month after the war, he toured Hiroshima, and for several years thereafter he testified, became a public spokesman, and lobbied for international nuclear cooperation. After leaving Los Alamos, Morrison returned to academia. For the rest of his life he was a forceful voice against nuclear weapons.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Economics
Political Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
Provider Set:
WGBH Open Vault
Date Added:
02/26/1986
Invasive Species: The Nation's Invasive Species Information System
Conditions of Use:
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The United States Government's Invasive Species website is the gateway to Federal efforts concerning invasive species. On this site users can learn about the impacts of invasive species and the Federal government's response, as well as read select species profiles and find links to agencies and organizations dealing with invasive species issues. This is also the website for the National Invasive Species Council, which coordinates Federal responses to the problem. Users can access geographically specific information on invasive species, a variety of databases, labs and regulations and the Federal management plan. Invasivespecies.gov provides a wealth of information on domestic invasive species.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Biology
Ecology
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College
Provider Set:
Starting Point (SERC)
Date Added:
10/23/2006