Document Analysis Worksheets

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Artifact Analysis Worksheet
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Public Domain
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The following artifact analysis worksheet was designed and developed by the Education Staff of the National Archives and Records Administration. You may find this worksheet useful as you introduce students to artifacts and primary sources of material culture, society and history.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Primary Source
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
National Archives and Records Administration
Provider Set:
Teaching With Documents
Date Added:
01/22/2014
Cartoon Analysis Worksheet
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Public Domain
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The cartoon analysis worksheet was designed and developed by the Education Staff of the National Archives and Records Administration. This worksheet will be useful when introducing students to cartoons as sources of historical, social and cultural information.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Primary Source
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
National Archives and Records Administration
Provider Set:
Teaching With Documents
Date Added:
01/22/2014
How is History Recorded? The Lewis and Clark Journals and Lakota Winter Counts
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In this activity, students read two primary documents from the early 1800s: a journal entry from the Lewis and Clark expedition and a Lakota Indian "winter count" calendar. Using an analysis worksheet, students identify key ideas and details from the documents, while also examining the craft and structure of each document. They draw upon both the content and form of the documents to make inferences about the respective cultures of Euro-Americans and Native Americans in the early 1800s.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
City University of New York
Provider Set:
HERB Social History
Date Added:
11/21/2019
Introduction to College: Reading in College
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CC BY
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In this activity, students are introduced to a worksheet that can be used to analyze a written primary source. The resource includes a written document, and written document analysis worksheet and a tutorial video to help you walk through both the reading of a primary source, annotating the source, and completing the worksheet.

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Lesson
Primary Source
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Hans Hauselmann
Date Added:
03/28/2020
James Madison Debates a Bill of Rights – America in Class – resources for history & literature teachers
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In this lesson students will explore some of the doubts and misgivings that arose as the Continental Congress debated whether or not to add a bill of rights to the Constitution. They will investigate a letter James Madison wrote to Thomas Jefferson on October 17, 1788, in which Madison discusses the pros and cons of a bill of rights. It is part of a series of letters these men exchanged on the topic. Jefferson, who was in Paris at the time, strongly supported inserting a list of fundamental liberties into the Constitution, and he asked Madison to keep him abreast of the debate. In this letter Madison not only updates Jefferson on the bill’s progress but also explains his thoughts about a bill of rights and its role in the American Constitution.

We have excerpted three passages from Madison’s letter, each accompanied by a series of close reading analytical questions for students to answer. The first excerpt explains the context of the debate, including reasons why a bill of rights might not be necessary. The second explores Madison’s reasons for supporting a bill of rights, and the third discusses how he believed such a list of rights, if written, should be structured. We have provided a short summary at the beginning of each excerpt. Spellings are retained from the original document.

You will find two interactive exercises in this lesson. The first allows students to review vocabulary found throughout the text. The second, recommended for use after you have conducted the close reading, reviews the central points of the textual analysis. You may want to use its first slide to direct whole class discussion in which you ask students to support their answers with evidence from the text. The second slide provides the correct responses with textual support.

It is important to remember that here the term “majority” refers to large groups of powerful politicians and legislators, not to a mass of voters. Moreover, Madison did not conceive of “minorities” as we do today — groups like women, African-Americans, Latinos, or other social or ethnic groups. Rather, when he uses the word, and when we use it in this lesson, it simply refers to a political group whose numbers are less than the majority.

This lesson consists of two parts, both accessible below. The teacher’s guide includes a background note, the text analysis with responses to the close reading questions, access to the interactive exercises, and an optional follow-up assignment. The student’s version, an interactive worksheet that can be e-mailed, contains all of the above except the responses to the close reading questions and the follow-up assignment.

Subject:
U.S. History
Political Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Interactive
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Reading
Author:
National Humanities Center
Date Added:
05/03/2019
Map Analysis Worksheet
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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The following map analysis worksheet was designed and developed by the Education Staff of the National Archives and Records Administration. You may find this worksheet useful as you introduce students to maps as primary sources of historical, social and cultural information.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Cultural Geography
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Primary Source
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
National Archives and Records Administration
Provider Set:
Teaching With Documents
Date Added:
01/22/2014
Motion Picture Analysis Worksheet
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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The following motion picture analysis worksheet was designed and developed by the Education Staff of the National Archives and Records Administration. You may find this worksheet useful as you introduce students to motion pictures as primary sources of historical, cultural, social and scientific information.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Primary Source
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
National Archives and Records Administration
Provider Set:
Teaching With Documents
Date Added:
01/22/2014
Photo Analysis Worksheet
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating

The photo analysis worksheet was designed and developed by the Education Staff of the National Archives and Records Administration. You may find this worksheet useful as you introduce students to photographs as primary sources of historical, cultural and social information.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Primary Source
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
National Archives and Records Administration
Provider Set:
Teaching With Documents
Date Added:
07/30/2003
Poster Analysis Worksheet
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Public Domain
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The following poster analysis worksheet was designed and developed by the Education Staff of the National Archives and Records Administration. You may find this worksheet useful as you introduce students to posters as sources of historical, social and cultural information.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
National Archives and Records Administration
Provider Set:
Teaching With Documents
Date Added:
01/22/2014
Slavery and Abolition
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CC BY
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Students will examine various primary source images and documents to develop research questions and make connections.  They will then research historical figures to learn about contributions and significance they had to the movement.  As they research, students will also learn about what individual slaves did before and after the Civil War and if emancipation changed their lives.  The students will then examine various primary source documents and record their findings on the Analyzing a Written Document worksheet.  They will then paraphrase what the document was about and explain why they believe it is important to history.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Author:
Lynn Ann Wiscount
Vince Mariner
Erin Halovanic
Date Added:
11/30/2020
Sound Recording Analysis Worksheet
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Public Domain
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The following sound recording analysis worksheet was designed and developed by the Education Staff of the National Archives and Records Administration. You may find this worksheet useful as you introduce sound recordings as primary sources of historical, social and cultural importance.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Primary Source
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
National Archives and Records Administration
Provider Set:
Teaching With Documents
Date Added:
01/22/2014
U.S. Constitution Workshop
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Public Domain
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This is a self-service online workshop for teachers who use primary documents to help students see the impact and ongoing relevance of the Constitution. It requires little advance preparation and provides everything needed, including a vocabulary list, document analysis worksheets, and historical documents -- John Marshall's Supreme Court nomination (1801), proclamation to New Orleans (1803), Lincoln's telegram to Grant (1864), Johnson oath photo (1963), and more.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Archives and Records Administration
Provider Set:
Teaching With Documents
Date Added:
10/27/2006
Week 9 - Research - WRT201 Crosby
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CC BY-NC-ND
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This is the week you “put it all together” and begin outlining and drafting your research paper. You will use the biographical information you gathered on your poet, the 3rd Essay that you wrote from the Writing in the Zones exercise, and your research from the library database (literary criticism on your chosen poem). Remember “Bird by Bird” and give yourself permission to write a $#iTty! first draft. Use the writing process to write down your ideas. Once you have ideas in front of you then you can make revisions.Sometimes it is helpful to look at a sample so you have a clear idea of how all of these parts come together. I have posted a sample research paper. Check out the thesis, the way the student incorporates sources of biographical information, historical information as well as literary criticism (indicated by citations). Don’t forget to also quote from your poem to show what lines you are looking at in your analysis!!To help you with writing this paper there are two worksheets: 1/the research worksheet that you can print off and use for each literary criticism source. This worksheet will help you build paragraphs as you analyze what scholars are saying about this poem. 2/the outline worksheet will help you organize your ideas.Once you have a rough outline (it can be bullets) and a rough draft and a works cited page, you will submit these parts, in that order and in one word document.  Be sure to check out the link Owl.English.Purdue for how to create complete citations for a works cited page. (You can cut and paste these citations from the databases…check out the toolbars on the side of the databases that indicate citations and choose MLA).You will also sign up for next week’s conferences where I will meet with you to go over your research paper outline/draft/works cited page. This is an informal chat and is meant to be helpful. If your paper is missing anything or veering off course, I can help you get on track. I can also answer any questions you may have.

Subject:
Literature
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Mary Crosby
Date Added:
02/19/2017
Written Document Analysis Worksheet
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating

The following document analysis worksheet was designed and developed by the Education Staff of the National Archives and Records Administration. You may find this worksheet useful as you introduce students to written documents.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Primary Source
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
National Archives and Records Administration
Provider Set:
Teaching With Documents
Date Added:
08/24/2000