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Citizen Science in OER Commons

Students enjoy doing 'real' science and by doing so they begin to see science as a way of examining the world by asking questions. Empowering students to contribute to the body of scientific knowledge also helps them develop a personal and vested interest in science. Citizen science projects connect students to scientists in the field, build observation skills and an understanding of phenology, use technology for data entry and evaluation, and provide opportunity for nature journaling, note-taking, and scientific writing. Involve your students in inquiry-based learning, while building an appreciation of science to their lives.

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50 Nifty United States
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We live on the continent of North America in the country of the United States. There are 50 states in this great country and as citizens of the United States we should know what those states are. In this seminar you will learn the names and locations of all 50 states. Wow your friends and family with your geographical knowledge!  Standards7.1.4.B Describe and locate places and regions as defined by physical and human features.

Subject:
Social Science
Political Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Allie Ezell
Date Added:
06/15/2022
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50 Nifty United States
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We live on the continent of North America in the country of the United States. There are 50 states in this great country and as citizens of the United States we should know what those states are. In this seminar you will learn the names and locations of all 50 states. Wow your friends and family with your geographical knowledge!  Standards7.1.4.B Describe and locate places and regions as defined by physical and human features.

Subject:
Social Science
Political Science
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Jenna Stork
Date Added:
01/11/2022
50 Nifty United States
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We live on the continent of North America in the country of the United States. There are 50 states in this great country and as citizens of the United States we should know what those states are. In this seminar you will learn the names and locations of all 50 states. Wow your friends and family with your geographical knowledge!  Standards7.1.4.B Describe and locate places and regions as defined by physical and human features.

Subject:
Social Science
Political Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Bonnie Waltz
Tracy Rains
Deanna Mayers
Date Added:
10/13/2017
Advancing Change through Public Awareness
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As diseases become stronger in nature, currently available antibiotics are no longer strong enough to suppress and cure said diseases. Therefore, what factors contribute to diseases becoming resistant to drugs and what public policies should be developed around them?  In this problem-based learning module, students will work with partners or in groups to first assess the increasing problem of drug-resistant diseases and the toll they are taking on the American public. Additionally, students will work to investigate what hospitals and lawmakers are doing to address this problem. Once students understand and are familiar with the current state of affairs, they will then work to further understand and research exactly why this issue needs to be brought to the attention of the general public, in order to promote change to current hospital procedures and policies. Further, students will determine the current political climate and support (or lack thereof) for policy, and will analyze the interest in keeping, changing or removing said policies altogether. Once the group has a full understanding, students will then work to determine their position on the issues surrounding antibiotic resistant diseases and the policies associated with these diseases. As soon as the group reaches a consensus, students will work to research and determine a professional way in which to present their goals and objectives for curbing the issue of drug-resistant diseases.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Blended Learning Teacher Practice Network
Date Added:
11/21/2017
American Government
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CC BY
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 American Government is designed to meet the scope and sequence requirements of the single-semester American government course. This title includes innovative features designed to enhance student learning, including Insider Perspective features and a Get Connected Module that shows students how they can get engaged in the political process. The book provides an important opportunity for students to learn the core concepts of American government and understand how those concepts apply to their lives and the world around them. American Government includes updated information on the 2016 presidential election.Senior Contributing AuthorsGlen Krutz (Content Lead), University of OklahomaSylvie Waskiewicz, PhD (Lead Editor)

Subject:
Social Science
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
01/06/2016
Ancient Lives
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For classics scholars, the vast number of damaged and fragmentary texts from the waste dumps of Greco-Roman Egypt has resulted in a difficult and time-consuming endeavor, with each manuscript requiring a character-by-character transcription. Words are gradually identified based on the transcribed characters and the manuscripts' linguistic characteristics. Both the discovery of new literary texts and the identification of known ones are then based on this analysis in relation to the established canon of extant Greek literature and its lexicons. Documentary texts, letters, receipts, and private accounts, are similarly assessed and identified through key terms and names. Furthermore, an immense number of detached fragments still linger, waiting to be joined with others to form a once intact text of ancient thought, both known and unknown. The data not only continues to reevaluate and assess the literature and knowledge of ancient Greece, but also illuminates the lives and culture of the multi-ethnic society of Greco-Roman Egypt.

Subject:
Ancient History
Material Type:
Interactive
Provider:
Citizen Science Alliance
Provider Set:
Zooniverse
Date Added:
02/26/2016
And Justice for All: the Trail of Tears, Mexican Deportation, and Japanese Internment
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Many textbooks mention the Trail of Tears, but fail to mention that this early displacement of an ethnic minority is only the one of many legally-sanctioned forced relocations. This lesson will address the displacement of American Indians through the Trail of Tears, the forced deportation of Mexican Americans during the Great Depression, and the internment of Japanese American citizens during WWII.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Law
General Law
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education
Provider Set:
LEARN NC Lesson Plans
Author:
Patricia Camp
Date Added:
01/26/2006
Applied Developmental Systems Science: Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Theories, Meta-Theories, Methods, and Interventions but Didn't Realize You Needed to Ask. An Advanced Textbook
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This textbook provides a toolbox, a guidebook, and an instruction manual for researchers and interventionists who want to conceptualize and study applied problems from a developmental systems perspective, and for those who want to teach their graduate (or advanced undergraduate) students how to do this. It is designed to be useful to practitioners who focus on applied developmental problems, such as improving the important developmental contexts where people live, learn, and work, including the applied professions in education, social work, counseling, health care, community development, and business, all of which at their core are concerned with optimizing the development of their students, clients, patients, workers, citizens, and others whose lives they touch.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Portland State University
Provider Set:
PDXOpen
Author:
Thomas A. Kindermann; Andrew Mashburn; Robert W. Roeser; Ellen A. Skinner; Cathleen L. Smith; Joel Steele
Date Added:
12/29/2015
Arctic and Antarctic Birds - Issue 11, February 2009
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This issue of the free online magazine, Beyond Penguins and Polar Bears, explores the amazing birds that live in or migrate to the polar regions. The issue was co-produced with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. In addition to content knowledge articles and lesson plans, the issue includes information about bird-themed citizen science programs from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

Subject:
Engineering
Education
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Ohio State University College of Education and Human Ecology
Provider Set:
Beyond Penguins and Polar Bears: An Online Magazine for K-5 Teachers
Author:
The Ohio State University
Date Added:
10/17/2014
Argumentation Routine
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This activity helps students learn to be open-minded and to participate in respectful discussion using evidence and reasoning. These are great life skills that any citizen of the world should have. They’re also scientific argumentation skills. The ability to change one’s mind based on evidence and reasoning, to see issues as complex, and to look at issues and claims from different perspectives are all scientific argumentation skills. Students also learn that absolute answers rarely exist. These skills and understandings are useful beyond science for anyone interested in figuring things out and in talking with others about issues, particularly with those who have different perspectives and opinions.

Subject:
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Beetles: Science and Teaching for Field Instructors
Date Added:
04/14/2020
Attenuated Democracy: A Critical Introduction to U.S. Government and Politics
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The U.S. political system suffers from endemic design flaws and is notable for the way that a small subset of Americans—whose interests often don’t align with those of the vast majority of the population—wields disproportionate power. Absent organized and persistent action on the part of ordinary Americans, the system tends to serve the already powerful. That’s why this text is called Attenuated Democracy. To attenuate something is to make it weak or thin. Democracy in America has been thin from the beginning and continues to be so despite some notable progress in voting rights. As political scientists Benjamin Page and Martin Gilens wrote, “The essence of democracy is not just having reasonably satisfactory policies; the essence of democracy is popular control of government, with each citizen having an equal voice.” (1) Since this is likely to be your only college-level course on the American political system, it is important to point out the structural weaknesses of our system and the thin nature of our democracy. Whenever you get the chance—in the voting booth, in your job, perhaps if you hold elected office—I encourage you to do something about America’s attenuated democracy.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Salt Lake Community College
Author:
David Hubert
Date Added:
09/29/2020
Be Internet Citizens
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In 2017, the ISD launched Be Internet Citizens in partnership with Google and YouTube, delivering in-school workshops and teacher training in schools across the UK. Our aim is to build young people’s resilience to online harms - including disinformation and hate speech - and empower them to become positive, accountable and conscientious leaders online.

Subject:
Information Science
Education
Educational Technology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Module
Provider:
Institute for Strategic Dialogue
Date Added:
07/13/2021
Beach Front Development: A Decision/Dilemma Case Study
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In this case study students will examine a development proposal for a new hotel to be built on Long Key in the community of Saint Pete Beach, Florida. Students will be assigned different roles in the community and state, including a scientist from the FWRI, a construction worker hired for the project, the hotelier, a local beachgoer, a tourist, a member of Citizens for Responsible growth, a nearby restaurant owner, an engineer form the Army Corps of Engineers, the City of St. Pete mayor, a local environmentalist, and the hearing board (who has the final say on the plan). Students will be provided several resources and background information on the proposed development. (See resources and materials sections) Students will also be provided time to conduct further research. A classroom public hearing will be held to create a recommendation and decide whether the development plan should be approved, declined, or amended. Each role will have two to three students working together to make their argument.

Subject:
Geology
Material Type:
Case Study
Reading
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
Connexions
Author:
Megan Eckert
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Big Questions For The Future Lecture Series
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This series looks at the Oxford Martin School's academics and how their research is making a difference to our global future. The series will be of interest to people who are concerned about the future for the planet, how civilisation will adapt to emerging problems and issues such as climate change, over population, increased urbanisation of populations and the creation of vaccines to fight against future pandemics. The Oxford Martin School academics explain their various research topics in an accessible and thoughtful way and try to find practical solutions to these issues.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Oxford
Provider Set:
University of Oxford Podcasts
Author:
Colin Goding|Ian Goldin|Adrian Hill|Angela McClean|Katherine Willis|Robyn Norton|Sonia Contera|Pedro Ferreira|Steve Rayner
Date Added:
08/20/2012
Brave New World - Connectivity
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The trifecta of globalization, urbanization and digitization have created new opportunities and challenges across our nation, cities, boroughs and urban centers. Cities are in a unique position at the center of commerce and technology becoming hubs for innovation and practical application of emerging technology. In this rapidly changing 24/7 digitized world, city governments worldwide are leveraging innovation and technology to become more effective, efficient, transparent and to be able to better plan for and anticipate the needs of its citizens, businesses and community organizations. This class will provide the framework for how cities and communities can become smarter and more accessible with technology and more connected.

Subject:
Engineering
Communication
Social Science
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Medgar Evers College
Author:
Binda, Rhonda S.
Date Added:
08/14/2020
Brave New World - Reslience
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The trifecta of globalization, urbanization and digitization have created new opportunities and challenges across our nation, cities, boroughs and urban centers. Cities are in a unique position at the center of commerce and technology becoming hubs for innovation and practical application of emerging technology. In this rapidly changing 24/7 digitized world, city governments worldwide are leveraging innovation and technology to become more effective, efficient, transparent and to be able to better plan for and anticipate the needs of its citizens, businesses and community organizations. This class will provide the framework for how cities and communities can become smarter and more accessible with technology and more connected.

Subject:
Computer Science
Environmental Science
Business and Communication
Social Science
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Medgar Evers College
Author:
Binda, Rhonda S.
Date Added:
08/14/2020
Brave New World - The Rise of Cities Globally: UrbanizationMeets Technological Innovation and Digitization
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The trifecta of globalization, urbanization and digitization have created new opportunities and challenges across our nation, cities, boroughs and urban centers. Cities are in a unique position at the center of commerce and technology becoming hubs for innovation and practical application of emerging technology. In this rapidly changing 24/7 digitized world, city governments worldwide are leveraging innovation and technology to become more effective, efficient, transparent and to be able to better plan for and anticipate the needs of its citizens, businesses and community organizations. This class will provide the framework for how cities and communities can become smarter and more accessible with technology and more connected.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Social Science
Economics
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Medgar Evers College
Author:
Binda, Rhonda S.
Date Added:
08/14/2020
Bridges, Not Walls: Speculative Fiction, Technology, and Social Justice
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In this unit, students will explore a variety of reading material and other media in order to connect technology with issues of social justice. Over the course of three phases, students will consider how technology may be used to facilitate tangible change within communities. Students will first explore a range of science fiction texts and discuss the benefits and drawbacks of the advanced technology described in each. They will then focus on a variety of social justice issues in fiction, news articles, and poetry. In doing so, students will determine what issues are most important to them, and think about what steps they might take to raise awareness about these topics. The unit culminates in a project-based learning experience for students, in which they will collaborate and use various forms of digital technology to initiate tangible change, inspired by the readings and discussions from our class sessions. Overall, the unit asks students to consider what it means to be active and responsible citizens within a community, how literature can inspire real societal progress, and what role technology can play in accomplishing that goal.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Yale-New Haven Teachers Institute
Provider Set:
2019 Curriculum Units Volume I
Date Added:
08/01/2019
Building Democracy for All: Interactive Explorations of Government and Civic Life
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Designed as a core or supplementary text for upper elementary, middle and high school teachers and students, Building Democracy for All offers instructional ideas, interactive resources, multicultural content, and multimodal learning materials for interest-building explorations of United States government as well as students’ roles as citizens in a democratic society. It focuses on the importance of community engagement and social responsibility as understood and acted upon by middle and high school students—core themes in the 2018 Massachusetts 8th Grade Curriculum Framework, and which are found in many state history and social studies curriculum frameworks around the country.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Date Added:
03/30/2020
Bumble Bee Watch
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Bumble Bee Watch is a Citizen Science Project provided through the partnerships of The Xerces Society, the University of Ottawa, Wildlife Preservation Canada, BeeSpotter, The Natural History Museum, London, and the Montreal Insectarium. This is a fun and interactive way that your students can contribute to the collection of scientific information about the friendly pollinator, the bumble bee! Join the team of volunteers to help track and learn!

Subject:
Environmental Science
Environmental Studies
Education
Elementary Education
Life Science
Biology
Material Type:
Interactive
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
The Bee Cause Project
Date Added:
12/08/2020
C3 Civics Test Inquiry
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This inquiry leads students through an investigation of the civics test, a current graduation requirement for Kentucky students, in order to consider the ways in which the test addresses needed knowledge and skills to prepare students for active engagement in civic life. The compelling question for the inquiry—can the civics test make you a good citizen?—frames students’ assessment of the civics test in consideration of what it means to be a “good citizen,” a purpose of the Kentucky civics test, as well as national initiatives to have similar civics test in all states, notably by the Joe Foss Institute.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Module
Unit of Study
Provider:
Kentucky C3
Date Added:
01/02/2020
CS 120 - Digital Literacy
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CC BY
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This course introduces terminology and gives an overview of the computer and information science. It focuses on the basic concepts of computer hardware and software systems, software applications, online inquiry, and evaluation of materials including ethical decisions. It also includes concepts reinforced in a laboratory environment. Through specific hands-on experience you will gather, evaluate, and solve real-world problems and form decisions based upon critical examination of today's technology.

This class is designed to teach you how to use a computer running a Windows Operating System. If you do not have access to a Windows computer or have problems doing assessments, please contact your Navigator to discuss your options.

Course Outcomes:
1. Identify current and future trends in computing and recognize various computing devices and their uses.
2. Identify the parts of a computer and their features and functions and recognize the advantages and limitations of important peripheral devices.
3. Identify and describe the features of desktop and specialized computer operating systems and understand the importance of system utilities, backups, and file management.
4. Explain why the web is important in today's society and why fluency in the tools and language of the Internet is necessary to be an educated consumer, a better student, an informed citizen, and a valuable employee.
5. Understand what a computer network is, identify different types of networks, and recognize threats to security and privacy.
6. Demonstrate the proper use of basic word processing, spreadsheet and presentation software features.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Linn-Benton Community College
Author:
Linn Benton Virtual College
Date Added:
07/09/2020
CS Fundamentals 4.17: Digital Citizenship
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In collaboration with Common Sense Education, this lesson helps students learn to think critically about the user information that some websites request or require. Students learn the difference between private information and personal information, distinguishing what is safe and unsafe to share online.

Students will also explore what it means to be responsible and respectful to their offline and online communities as a step toward learning how to be good digital citizens.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Fundamentals 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Fundamentals 6.19: Digital Sharing
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Loaned to Computer Science Fundamentals by the team over at Copyright and Creativity, this lesson exists to help students understand the challenges and benefits of respecting ownership and copyright, particularly in digital environments. Students should be encouraged to respect artists’ rights as an important part of being an ethical digital citizen.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Fundamentals 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS for Oregon Plan Version 1.0
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The Computer Science (CS) for Oregon Plan aims to create rich computer science learning opportunities bydeveloping a shared vision, based on national frameworks and standards to prepare all students, K-12,with computer science knowledge and computational thinking skills necessary to be innovators, creators,and active citizens in our ever-evolving, technology-driven world.

The goals of the CS for Oregon Plan are to create K-12 pathways and roadmaps that provide cohesive,scaffolded learning opportunities to students, focus on inclusion, equity, and access for all, and supportrigorous learning opportunities aligned to workforce needs. Our collaborative, multi-district approachfocuses on creating a clear, concise definition of computer science, understanding the current CSlandscape including barriers and opportunities, evaluating the K12CS framework and its associatedstandards, developing key learning indicators per grade-band mapped to the national framework,connecting educators to aligned resources and associated professional development opportunities,documenting and sharing sample strategies for creating opportunity for all students, and developing andimplementing action plans. As such, the CS for Oregon Plan’s intended audiences are principals,superintendents, STEM/CTE leaders, educators, school counselors, grant managers and foundations, theOregon Department of Education, the Chief Education Office, and legislators. Our advisory group,providing direction and feedback, is comprised of education, non-profit, industry, and state leaders.This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
For questions and comments contact Jill Hubbard at jill@jillhubbard.com
Date Added:
09/15/2019
Campaign finance
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An introduction to campaign finance in the United States up to and after Citizens United: soft vs hard money, PACs and super PACs, the 2002 BCRA (McCain-Feingold Act).

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Khan Academy
Author:
Sal Khan
Date Added:
07/16/2021
The Carrie Chapman Catt Center for Women and Politics
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-ND
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This website was founded at Iowa State University to educate and engage citizens on the political process. The center brings national and international scholars, women leaders and political activists onto campus for programs, seminars and lectures.

Subject:
U.S. History
Political Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Date Added:
05/08/2017
Chinese Exclusion Act
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Starting with the Gold Rush, Chinese migrated to California and other regions of the United States in search of work. As several photographs show, many Chinese found work in the gold mines and on the railroads. They accepted $32.50 a month to work on the Union Pacific in Wyoming in 1870 for the same job that paid white workers $52 a month. This led to deep resentment by the whites, who felt the Chinese were competing unfairly for jobs. White labor unions blamed the Chinese for lower wages and lack of jobs, and anti-Chinese feelings grew. The cartoon "You Know How It Is Yourself" expresses this sentiment. Several political cartoons in this topic are graphic representations of racism and conflicts between whites and Chinese. "Won't They Remain Here in Spite of the New Constitution?" shows a demonized figure of political corruption protecting Chinese cheap labor, dirty politicians, capital, and financiers. "The Tables Turned" shows Denis Kearney (head of the Workingman's Party of California, a union that had criticized Chinese laborers) in jail, being taunted by Chinese men. In 1880, President Rutherford B. Hayes signed the Chinese Exclusion Treaty, which placed strict limitations on the number of Chinese allowed to enter the United States and the number allowed to become naturalized citizens. In 1882, Congress passed the Chinese Exclusion Act, which prohibited immigration from China (The Act was not repealed until 1943). The two-part cartoon from the July-December 1882 issue of The Wasp reflects how some citizens saw the situation. After the Act was passed, anti-Chinese violence increased. One illustration depicts the Rock Springs Massacre of 1885, a Wyoming race riot in which 28 Chinese were killed by British and Swedish miners. The "Certificate of Residence" document illustrates that Chinese individuals were required to prove their residence in the United States prior to the passage of the Exclusion Act. The poster offering a reward for Wong Yuk, a Chinese man, makes it clear that the United States was actively deporting Chinese. Despite discrimination and prejudice, this first wave of immigrants established thriving communities. Photographs taken in San Francisco's Chinatown show prosperous businesses, such as the "Chinese Butcher and Grocery Shop." Wealthy merchants formed active business associations, represented by the image "Officers of the Chinese Six Companies." The Chinese celebrated their heritage by holding cultural festivals, as shown in the photograph from 1896. The photographs "Children of High Class," "Golden Gate Park," and "Chinese Passengers on Ferry" are evidence that some Chinese adopted Western-style clothing while others wore more traditional attire.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Reading
Provider:
University of California
Provider Set:
Calisphere - California Digital Library
Date Added:
04/25/2013
Citizen Science Central
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This site is a gateway to projects involving public participants in real-world research, with hopes of fostering connections for sharing ideas and resources.

Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Case Study
Diagram/Illustration
Game
Interactive
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Provider:
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
Provider Set:
Citizen Science
Date Added:
02/11/2013
Citizen Science with Zooniverse
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Educational Use
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Students learn that ordinary citizens, including students like themselves, can make meaningful contributions to science through the concept of "citizen science." First, students learn some examples of ongoing citizen science projects that are common around the world, such as medical research, medication testing and donating idle computer time to perform scientific calculations. Then they explore Zooniverse, an interactive website that shows how research in areas from marine biology to astronomy leverage the power of the Internet to use the assistance of non-scientists to classify large amounts of data that is unclassifiable by machines for various reasons. To conclude, student groups act as engineering teams to brainstorm projects ideas for their own town that could benefit from community help, then design conceptual interactive websites that could organize and support the projects.

Subject:
Engineering
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Jennifer Nider
Lori Rice
Paul Cain
Sujatha Prakash
Yasche Glass
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Remix
Citizens
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CC BY-NC-SA
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A Project Based Learning Outline for Citizenship and Martin Luther King Jr. Day. To be used with Kindergarten, 1st or 2nd Grade, as fitted with standards.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Griselda Peters
Date Added:
08/08/2019
Citizens Co-creating Sustainable Cities
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Around the world, major challenges of our time such as population growth and climate change are being addressed in cities. Here, citizens play an important role amidst governments, companies, NGOs and researchers in creating social, technological and political innovations for achieving sustainability.

Citizens can be co-creators of sustainable cities when they engage in city politics or in the design of the urban environment and its technologies and infrastructure. In addition, citizens influence and are influenced by the technologies and systems that they use every day. Sustainability is thus a result of the interplay between technology, policy and people’s daily lives. Understanding this interplay is essential for creating sustainable cities. In this MOOC, we zoom in on Amsterdam, Beijing, Ho Chi Minh City, Nairobi, Kampala and Suzhou as living labs for exploring the dynamics of co-creation for sustainable cities worldwide. We will address topics such as participative democracy and legitimacy, ICTs and big data, infrastructure and technology, and SMART technologies in daily life.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Delft University of Technology
Provider Set:
Delft University OpenCourseWare
Author:
Huub Rijnaarts
Date Added:
07/18/2018
Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission
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CC BY-NC-SA
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A deep dive into Citizens United v. FEC, a 2010 Supreme Court case that ruled that political spending by corporations, associations, and labor unions is a form of protected speech under the First Amendment. In this video, Sal discusses the case with scholars Richard Hasen and Bradley Smith.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Khan Academy
Author:
Sal Khan
Date Added:
07/16/2021
The Citizenship Complex: Why the Vote Matters in the Race for Freedom and Equality for All
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Educational Use
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Not all people are born equal or free but there is an expectation of both when you are a citizen of the United States. Our struggles to earn the base level of representation are quickly forgotten as we look for another group to demonize. In my unit we will discover why George Washington was ahead of his time with his warning about "factions" and how their existence makes freedom and equality harder to bridge. As we trek through time highlighting issues such as the abolition of slavery, support for women's suffrage, and the challenges that face Asian and LGBTQIA communities my hope is that student understand the sacrifices made to be accepted and to earn the right to vote but more importantly the difficulty in being welcomed into American society.

The “Citizenship Complex” is the process by which groups gain full inclusion. To understand it, one must look to the intersection of law, citizenship and the Constitution. The unit aims to provide a more complex history of our nation, to tell a more earnest story of how the American identity became a mosaic of human struggle, and to offer a more robust and enlightening study of these issues so that as students recognize the power of citizenship they will take a more hopeful view of what our nation will look like in the future. By engaging in the sophisticated discussions of the past, identifying why some groups supported each other and scapegoated others, and learning about the importance of supporting efforts at inclusion, our students should become more informed, open-minded, and ready for the globalized world of the 21 st Century.

The unit will focus on four groups that have experienced the “Citizenship Complex”: African-American slaves, women, Asian immigrants, and the LGBTQIA community. By comparing these groups over time, we will really be able to unearth the cycles behind the Citizenship Complex and understand that American citizenship means at different times in our country’s history.

Subject:
U.S. History
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Yale-New Haven Teachers Institute
Provider Set:
2016 Curriculum Units Volume III
Date Added:
08/01/2016
Citizenship and its Ability to Change Lives
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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This curriculum unit focuses on children as citizens, and how they can claim ownership of their citizenship. Overall the unit works its way through the rights that children have as citizens and how they can use them to their advantage. It starts with what it means to them to be citizens, two specific rights that they have, and finally how they will use those rights to better their lives. The two rights that we discuss in this unit are education and voting. Those rights are the focus of this unit because I believe that they are the most important to young children and that they will benefit them the most in the long term. Education will provide the foundation for all of their learning throughout their lives, and voting is something that education prepares them for and will later in life affect their community and potentially the nation. I also believe that having an understanding of how voting actually impacts this country could potentially interest them in being active politically in the future.

Subject:
U.S. History
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Yale-New Haven Teachers Institute
Provider Set:
2016 Curriculum Units Volume III
Date Added:
08/01/2016
Civic Responsibilities PowerPoint
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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This PowerPoint presentation covers the various responsibilities that citizens have. It was created for a civics class for juniors and seniors.

Subject:
History
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
Kathryn Rose
Date Added:
03/12/2018