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Citizen Science in OER Commons

Students enjoy doing 'real' science and by doing so they begin to see science as a way of examining the world by asking questions. Empowering students to contribute to the body of scientific knowledge also helps them develop a personal and vested interest in science. Citizen science projects connect students to scientists in the field, build observation skills and an understanding of phenology, use technology for data entry and evaluation, and provide opportunity for nature journaling, note-taking, and scientific writing. Involve your students in inquiry-based learning, while building an appreciation of science to their lives.

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50 Nifty United States
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We live on the continent of North America in the country of the United States. There are 50 states in this great country and as citizens of the United States we should know what those states are. In this seminar you will learn the names and locations of all 50 states. Wow your friends and family with your geographical knowledge!  Standards7.1.4.B Describe and locate places and regions as defined by physical and human features.

Subject:
Social Science
Political Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Bonnie Waltz
Tracy Rains
Deanna Mayers
Date Added:
10/13/2017
AP Government and Politics - Comparative : Citizens  Society  and the State
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AP Gov Politics Comparative AP Gov Comp Citizens Society State. Citizens Society and the State. Citizens Society and the State Social Cleavages Social Movements and Political Violence CitizenState Relationships Civil Society and State Presentation Module Wrapup

Subject:
History
Social Science
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Georgia Virtual
Author:
Georgia Virtual School
Date Added:
06/02/2018
Advancing Change through Public Awareness
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As diseases become stronger in nature, currently available antibiotics are no longer strong enough to suppress and cure said diseases. Therefore, what factors contribute to diseases becoming resistant to drugs and what public policies should be developed around them?  In this problem-based learning module, students will work with partners or in groups to first assess the increasing problem of drug-resistant diseases and the toll they are taking on the American public. Additionally, students will work to investigate what hospitals and lawmakers are doing to address this problem. Once students understand and are familiar with the current state of affairs, they will then work to further understand and research exactly why this issue needs to be brought to the attention of the general public, in order to promote change to current hospital procedures and policies. Further, students will determine the current political climate and support (or lack thereof) for policy, and will analyze the interest in keeping, changing or removing said policies altogether. Once the group has a full understanding, students will then work to determine their position on the issues surrounding antibiotic resistant diseases and the policies associated with these diseases. As soon as the group reaches a consensus, students will work to research and determine a professional way in which to present their goals and objectives for curbing the issue of drug-resistant diseases.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Blended Learning Teacher Practice Network
Date Added:
11/21/2017
American Government
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 American Government is designed to meet the scope and sequence requirements of the single-semester American government course. This title includes innovative features designed to enhance student learning, including Insider Perspective features and a Get Connected Module that shows students how they can get engaged in the political process. The book provides an important opportunity for students to learn the core concepts of American government and understand how those concepts apply to their lives and the world around them. American Government includes updated information on the 2016 presidential election.Senior Contributing AuthorsGlen Krutz (Content Lead), University of OklahomaSylvie Waskiewicz, PhD (Lead Editor)

Subject:
Social Science
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
01/06/2016
American National Government Undergraduate Syllabus
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American National Government Undergraduate Syllabus

PS 201 American National Government

Course Description

This course provides an overview of the design and process of American national government. Introductory topics focus on American political culture and the ideas that are central not only to the design of the U.S. Constitution, but also to the values that structure current political debates. Additionally, we explore how the U.S. Constitution changed over time to open the democratic process to previously excluded groups (African Americans, Latinos, Women, etc.). We also focus on how the core institutions of American government function in the American federal system. Special attention is paid to the political behavior of the major institutional actors (Members of Congress, Presidents, Supreme Court Justices). Other course topics explore elements of the democratic process including the role of political parties, interest groups, campaigns, voting, elections, and public opinion. Although the course primarily focuses on the basic structure and function of American government, we cover current political debates to improve students’ general knowledge about contemporary American politics.

By the end of this course students should…
1. Be familiar with the core structures and institutions of American national government.
2. Understand the fundamental process of who gets what, when, and how in American politics.
3. Identify and critically evaluate central conflicts in American politics.
4. Develop an understanding for the role that citizens play in American democracy.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Earlene Camarillo
Date Added:
03/08/2021
Ancient Lives
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For classics scholars, the vast number of damaged and fragmentary texts from the waste dumps of Greco-Roman Egypt has resulted in a difficult and time-consuming endeavor, with each manuscript requiring a character-by-character transcription. Words are gradually identified based on the transcribed characters and the manuscripts' linguistic characteristics. Both the discovery of new literary texts and the identification of known ones are then based on this analysis in relation to the established canon of extant Greek literature and its lexicons. Documentary texts, letters, receipts, and private accounts, are similarly assessed and identified through key terms and names. Furthermore, an immense number of detached fragments still linger, waiting to be joined with others to form a once intact text of ancient thought, both known and unknown. The data not only continues to reevaluate and assess the literature and knowledge of ancient Greece, but also illuminates the lives and culture of the multi-ethnic society of Greco-Roman Egypt.

Subject:
Ancient History
Material Type:
Interactive
Provider:
Citizen Science Alliance
Provider Set:
Zooniverse
Date Added:
02/26/2016
And Justice for All: the Trail of Tears, Mexican Deportation, and Japanese Internment
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Many textbooks mention the Trail of Tears, but fail to mention that this early displacement of an ethnic minority is only the one of many legally-sanctioned forced relocations. This lesson will address the displacement of American Indians through the Trail of Tears, the forced deportation of Mexican Americans during the Great Depression, and the internment of Japanese American citizens during WWII.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Law
General Law
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education
Provider Set:
LEARN NC Lesson Plans
Author:
Patricia Camp
Date Added:
01/26/2006
Applied Developmental Systems Science: Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Theories, Meta-Theories, Methods, and Interventions but Didn't Realize You Needed to Ask. An Advanced Textbook
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This textbook provides a toolbox, a guidebook, and an instruction manual for researchers and interventionists who want to conceptualize and study applied problems from a developmental systems perspective, and for those who want to teach their graduate (or advanced undergraduate) students how to do this. It is designed to be useful to practitioners who focus on applied developmental problems, such as improving the important developmental contexts where people live, learn, and work, including the applied professions in education, social work, counseling, health care, community development, and business, all of which at their core are concerned with optimizing the development of their students, clients, patients, workers, citizens, and others whose lives they touch.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Portland State University
Provider Set:
PDXOpen
Author:
Thomas A. Kindermann; Andrew Mashburn; Robert W. Roeser; Ellen A. Skinner; Cathleen L. Smith; Joel Steele
Date Added:
12/29/2015
Arctic and Antarctic Birds - Issue 11, February 2009
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This issue of the free online magazine, Beyond Penguins and Polar Bears, explores the amazing birds that live in or migrate to the polar regions. The issue was co-produced with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. In addition to content knowledge articles and lesson plans, the issue includes information about bird-themed citizen science programs from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

Subject:
Engineering
Education
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Ohio State University College of Education and Human Ecology
Provider Set:
Beyond Penguins and Polar Bears: An Online Magazine for K-5 Teachers
Author:
The Ohio State University
Date Added:
10/17/2014
Argumentation Routine
Read the Fine Print
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This activity helps students learn to be open-minded and to participate in respectful discussion using evidence and reasoning. These are great life skills that any citizen of the world should have. They’re also scientific argumentation skills. The ability to change one’s mind based on evidence and reasoning, to see issues as complex, and to look at issues and claims from different perspectives are all scientific argumentation skills. Students also learn that absolute answers rarely exist. These skills and understandings are useful beyond science for anyone interested in figuring things out and in talking with others about issues, particularly with those who have different perspectives and opinions.

Subject:
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Beetles: Science and Teaching for Field Instructors
Date Added:
04/14/2020
Attenuated Democracy
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The U.S. political system suffers from endemic design flaws and is notable for the way that a small subset of Americans—whose interests often don’t align with those of the vast majority of the population—wields disproportionate power. Absent organized and persistent action on the part of ordinary Americans, the system tends to serve the already powerful. That’s why this text is called Attenuated Democracy. To attenuate something is to make it weak or thin. Democracy in America has been thin from the beginning and continues to be so despite some notable progress in voting rights. As political scientists Benjamin Page and Martin Gilens wrote, “The essence of democracy is not just having reasonably satisfactory policies; the essence of democracy is popular control of government, with each citizen having an equal voice.” (1) Since this is likely to be your only college-level course on the American political system, it is important to point out the structural weaknesses of our system and the thin nature of our democracy. Whenever you get the chance—in the voting booth, in your job, perhaps if you hold elected office—I encourage you to do something about America’s attenuated democracy.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Salt Lake Community College
Author:
David Hubert
Date Added:
09/29/2020
Be Internet Citizens
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In 2017, the ISD launched Be Internet Citizens in partnership with Google and YouTube, delivering in-school workshops and teacher training in schools across the UK. Our aim is to build young people’s resilience to online harms - including disinformation and hate speech - and empower them to become positive, accountable and conscientious leaders online.

Subject:
Information Science
Education
Educational Technology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Module
Provider:
Institute for Strategic Dialogue
Date Added:
07/13/2021
Beach Front Development: A Decision/Dilemma Case Study
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In this case study students will examine a development proposal for a new hotel to be built on Long Key in the community of Saint Pete Beach, Florida. Students will be assigned different roles in the community and state, including a scientist from the FWRI, a construction worker hired for the project, the hotelier, a local beachgoer, a tourist, a member of Citizens for Responsible growth, a nearby restaurant owner, an engineer form the Army Corps of Engineers, the City of St. Pete mayor, a local environmentalist, and the hearing board (who has the final say on the plan). Students will be provided several resources and background information on the proposed development. (See resources and materials sections) Students will also be provided time to conduct further research. A classroom public hearing will be held to create a recommendation and decide whether the development plan should be approved, declined, or amended. Each role will have two to three students working together to make their argument.

Subject:
Geology
Material Type:
Case Study
Reading
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
Connexions
Author:
Megan Eckert
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Big Questions For The Future Lecture Series
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This series looks at the Oxford Martin School's academics and how their research is making a difference to our global future. The series will be of interest to people who are concerned about the future for the planet, how civilisation will adapt to emerging problems and issues such as climate change, over population, increased urbanisation of populations and the creation of vaccines to fight against future pandemics. The Oxford Martin School academics explain their various research topics in an accessible and thoughtful way and try to find practical solutions to these issues.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Oxford
Provider Set:
University of Oxford Podcasts
Author:
Colin Goding|Ian Goldin|Adrian Hill|Angela McClean|Katherine Willis|Robyn Norton|Sonia Contera|Pedro Ferreira|Steve Rayner
Date Added:
08/20/2012
Building Democracy for All:  Interactive Explorations of Government and Civic Life
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Building Democracy for All is an interactive, multimodal, multicultural, open access eBook for teaching and learning key topics in United States Government and Civic Life. Open access means these materials are “digital, online, and free of charge.” This book is available online to anyone with an internet connection. The eBook can also be viewed and printed as a PDF file.

Designed as a core or supplementary resource for middle and high school teachers and students, this eBook offers instructional ideas, information, interactive resources, primary documents, and multicultural and multimodal learning materials for interest-building explorations of United States government as well as students’ roles as citizens in a democratic society. It focuses on the importance of community engagement and social responsibility as understood and acted upon by middle and high school students—core themes in the 2018 Massachusetts 8th Grade Curriculum Framework and many other state curriculum standards around the country.

Building Democracy for All is being developed by a collaborative writing team of higher education faculty, public school teachers, educational librarians, and college students who are preparing to become history and social studies teachers. The primary editors and curators are from the University of Massachusetts Amherst College of Education. Contributors are from school districts in the Connecticut River valley region of western Massachusetts (Amherst, Gateway, Westfield, Hampshire Regional, and Springfield). As an open resource, the book is being revised constantly by the members of the writing team to ensure timely inclusion of online resources and information.

Subject:
U.S. History
Political Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Interactive
Lesson Plan
Module
Primary Source
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Robert W. Maloy
Torrey Trust
Date Added:
03/30/2020
Bumble Bee Watch
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Bumble Bee Watch is a Citizen Science Project provided through the partnerships of The Xerces Society, the University of Ottawa, Wildlife Preservation Canada, BeeSpotter, The Natural History Museum, London, and the Montreal Insectarium. This is a fun and interactive way that your students can contribute to the collection of scientific information about the friendly pollinator, the bumble bee! Join the team of volunteers to help track and learn!

Subject:
Environmental Science
Environmental Studies
Education
Elementary Education
Life Science
Biology
Material Type:
Interactive
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
The Bee Cause Project
Date Added:
12/08/2020