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What/Why Scholarly Communication

This collection contains materials scoped to the breadth of scholarly communication rather than particular subtopics.

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Introduction to Bibliodiversity in Scholarly Communications
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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This resource was created by Allison Kittinger, a library science master’s student at UNC-Chapel Hill, and Jennifer Solomon, an adjunct instructor at UNC-Chapel Hill. Allison and Jennifer are passionate about fostering bibliodiversity in scholarly communications and want to increase awareness of bibliodiversity among library science graduate students and early-career scholarly communications librarians. After engaging with this resource, learners will: gain an understanding of bibliodiversity, its urgency, and its importance; be able to articulate the concept of bibliodiversity in their own words/apply it in their work; and gain additional tools to apply DEI concepts in scholarly communications.

More background is available at https://lisoer.wordpress.ncsu.edu/2021/04/13/bibliodiversity-and-oer-a-student-perspective/.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Unit of Study
Author:
Allison Kittinger
Jennifer Solomon
Date Added:
10/25/2021
ScholCom202X: an interactive fiction game about being a scholarly communication librarian
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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In ScholCom 202X, you'll take on the role of a new scholarly communication librarian at a small public university somewhere in the US in the "distant future" of the year 202X.

You'll be given a number of scenarios derived from activities and questions a real scholarly communication librarian might expect to receive. These scenarios fall into four general areas: copyright; publishing; institutional repositories; and open access.

The game has two versions, an interactive fiction format written in Ink (located in the "Ink source" and "playable" folders) and a static PDF version (in "printables").

In the interactive fiction version, after reading each scenario you'll be given a chance to consult your "augment," a smartphone-like device which contains a very brief annotated list of some relevant sources and a calendar that tracks how busy you are. In the PDF/print version, these sources are listed below the scenario text, and are open access whenever possible.

After you've read the scenario text and consulted these sources (or not), put yourself in the place of the librarian in the game and think about how you would respond. Would you try to help just the person you're currently talking to, or would you rather build resources and develop strategies that could make the question easier to answer the next time it comes up, and potentially even reach and educate people who don't know the questions to ask in the first place?

As you think through each scenario, ask yourself how you would balance the desire to do a good job against the threat of overwork. You're welcome to write out what you would do, or just think about it. The PDF versions of the scenarios can also be used to role play in a classroom setting, with one student taking on the role of the librarian and another the role of the person who needs their help.

Playable version at https://people.wou.edu/~bakersc/ScholCom202X/index.html. Additional background available at https://lisoer.wordpress.ncsu.edu/2021/05/18/new-to-the-scn-scholcom-202x-an-interactive-fiction-game/.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Game
Interactive
Simulation
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Stewart Baker
Date Added:
10/25/2021