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Open Education

This collection contains materials about open educational resources (OER) and open education practices (AKA open pedagogy) and related issues.

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Equity and Consent in Open Education
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CC BY
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This lesson plan, developed originally for graduate Library and Information Science (LIS) students is focused on developing culturally responsive and equity-minded LIS professionals when promoting open education with students, scholars, and community members from historically underrepresented backgrounds and/or with marginalized identities. Though many open practitioners discuss and leverage open education as a means of democratizing education and information access, we must remember the harm that learners and scholars face when we adopt openness with a paternalistic mindset. This lesson consists of readings, case studies, slide decks, and discussions.

Subject:
Information Science
Higher Education
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
Jessica Dai
Natalie Hill
Date Added:
09/02/2021
The Role of School Librarians in OER Curation: A Framework to Guide Practice
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CC BY
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This document is an evidence-based guide that outlines the practical and policy supports needed to enable K-12 school librarians to take on leadership roles around OER, and to support OER curation efforts by librarians and all educators.

This guide is based on a study led by ISKME (iskme.org) in collaboration with Florida State University's School of Information. The study is titled “Exploring OER Curation and the Role of School Librarians". ISKME designs guides and toolkits that help educators navigate and implement new teaching and learning practices. Grounded in research, our evidence-based guides and toolkits help articulate what actually works in real education settings—and are tailored to the unique professional learning needs of our clients and their stakeholders.

The study was made possible in part by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (www.imls.gov), under grant number LG-86-17-0035-17. The findings and recommendations expressed in this document do not necessarily represent those of the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Case Study
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
ISKME
Date Added:
05/04/2020
ScholCom202X: an interactive fiction game about being a scholarly communication librarian
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CC BY
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In ScholCom 202X, you'll take on the role of a new scholarly communication librarian at a small public university somewhere in the US in the "distant future" of the year 202X.

You'll be given a number of scenarios derived from activities and questions a real scholarly communication librarian might expect to receive. These scenarios fall into four general areas: copyright; publishing; institutional repositories; and open access.

The game has two versions, an interactive fiction format written in Ink (located in the "Ink source" and "playable" folders) and a static PDF version (in "printables").

In the interactive fiction version, after reading each scenario you'll be given a chance to consult your "augment," a smartphone-like device which contains a very brief annotated list of some relevant sources and a calendar that tracks how busy you are. In the PDF/print version, these sources are listed below the scenario text, and are open access whenever possible.

After you've read the scenario text and consulted these sources (or not), put yourself in the place of the librarian in the game and think about how you would respond. Would you try to help just the person you're currently talking to, or would you rather build resources and develop strategies that could make the question easier to answer the next time it comes up, and potentially even reach and educate people who don't know the questions to ask in the first place?

As you think through each scenario, ask yourself how you would balance the desire to do a good job against the threat of overwork. You're welcome to write out what you would do, or just think about it. The PDF versions of the scenarios can also be used to role play in a classroom setting, with one student taking on the role of the librarian and another the role of the person who needs their help.

Playable version at https://people.wou.edu/~bakersc/ScholCom202X/index.html. Additional background available at https://lisoer.wordpress.ncsu.edu/2021/05/18/new-to-the-scn-scholcom-202x-an-interactive-fiction-game/.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Game
Interactive
Simulation
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Stewart Baker
Date Added:
10/25/2021