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Open Access

This collection contains materials about open access to scholarly literature, including articles, books, chapters, reports, conference proceedings and presentations.

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Open Access publishing and Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) faculty qualitative study lesson plan
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Knowledge of open access stakes and initiatives is critical for understanding and promoting the fundamental role of faculty and librarians in the scholarly information cycle as academia aims to become diverse, equitable, and inclusive and make scholarship more accessible. Despite the open movement being decades old, there is still a gap in research on Black, Indigenous, and faculty of color (BIPOC) in the context of open access. Understanding the motivations for and barriers against Open Access (OA) publishing (and the relationships between them) among BIPOC faculty helps LIS practitioners and Open advocates design incentives to increase participation and decrease lack of knowledge and stigma around OA.

In 2020, Principle Investigator, Tatiana Bryant and her research team designed an original qualitative study that uncovers ways in which pre-tenure and tenured BIPOC perceive attitudes towards the legitimacy of open access publishing, especially as it relates to their own tenure and promotion processes. To advance this research, select study instruments are available in the Scholarly Communication Notebook for reuse and adaptation as part of a lesson plan designed to teach LIS students and professionals to consider how qualitative research methods can support their praxis.

Subject:
Information Science
Higher Education
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Tatiana Bryant
Date Added:
09/20/2021
Open for Health: How Open Access Can Create a More Equitable World
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This resource is intended as a module for graduate students in health sciences fields such as medicine, nursing, and public health, and librarians who work in these and related fields. The assignment will briefly review the literature on the three main themes (open access, social justice, and health equity) to provide background on the topic. Following this overview, students will break into groups, and each group will be given a topic with questions to spark discussion on the subject. Questions such as "Historically, how has access to health information created benefits or barriers to users?" or "When thinking about medical research, what stakeholders are concerned about open access and why?" Each group will select a notetaker to keep track of the responses, and time will be given in class to report out and have a wider discussion with each other. The materials provided include an optional pre-reading assignment, slide deck, lesson plan, and a sample comprehension check.

These resources are also available at https://scholarworks.iupui.edu/handle/1805/26714

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Information Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Lesson Plan
Module
Author:
Caitlin Pike
Date Added:
10/13/2021
ScholCom202X: an interactive fiction game about being a scholarly communication librarian
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CC BY
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In ScholCom 202X, you'll take on the role of a new scholarly communication librarian at a small public university somewhere in the US in the "distant future" of the year 202X.

You'll be given a number of scenarios derived from activities and questions a real scholarly communication librarian might expect to receive. These scenarios fall into four general areas: copyright; publishing; institutional repositories; and open access.

The game has two versions, an interactive fiction format written in Ink (located in the "Ink source" and "playable" folders) and a static PDF version (in "printables").

In the interactive fiction version, after reading each scenario you'll be given a chance to consult your "augment," a smartphone-like device which contains a very brief annotated list of some relevant sources and a calendar that tracks how busy you are. In the PDF/print version, these sources are listed below the scenario text, and are open access whenever possible.

After you've read the scenario text and consulted these sources (or not), put yourself in the place of the librarian in the game and think about how you would respond. Would you try to help just the person you're currently talking to, or would you rather build resources and develop strategies that could make the question easier to answer the next time it comes up, and potentially even reach and educate people who don't know the questions to ask in the first place?

As you think through each scenario, ask yourself how you would balance the desire to do a good job against the threat of overwork. You're welcome to write out what you would do, or just think about it. The PDF versions of the scenarios can also be used to role play in a classroom setting, with one student taking on the role of the librarian and another the role of the person who needs their help.

Playable version at https://people.wou.edu/~bakersc/ScholCom202X/index.html. Additional background available at https://lisoer.wordpress.ncsu.edu/2021/05/18/new-to-the-scn-scholcom-202x-an-interactive-fiction-game/.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Game
Interactive
Simulation
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Stewart Baker
Date Added:
10/25/2021