Author:
Suzanne Ensmann
Subject:
Languages
Material Type:
Module
Level:
Adult Education
Tags:
Adult Education, CCRS, Characters, College & Career Readiness Standards, Designers for Learning, Dialogue, Research, Screenplay, Short Film Script, Writing, ccrs, college-career-readiness-standards
License:
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0
Language:
English
Media Formats:
Interactive

Ideas - Write a Screenplay for a Movie!

Module Overview

____________________________________________________________________________

From Albion Movie, Inc.: 

"BROUGHT TO YOU BY OUR SPONSOR:Bradenton Anna Maria Island Longboat Key

Our lesson plans are available at no cost to educators, thanks to the generosity of our education sponsor. Please visit the Bradenton Gulf Islands on Florida’s Gulf Coast".

____________________________________________________________________________

This lesson is to foster an understanding of how screenplay ideas are written, developed and supported with events, characters, dialogue, and other elements.
Note: Original .01 Ideas Lesson Plan created by Albion Movie, Inc.; this version modified for Adult Learners with their permission.
 

Learner Audience / Primary Users

Adult, 9th-12th grade reading level , non-traditional student working towards achieving a high school diploma

 

Addresses: College & Career Readiness Standards (CCRS) Alignment

  • Level: Adult Education

  • Grade Level: CCRS Grade Level E (9-12 grade reading level)

  • Subject: CCRS English Language Arts

  • Strand: CCRS Writing Strand

    • Sub-strand: Writing of Literature, History/Social Studies, or Technical subjects
  • Standard Description: CCRS description(s) for the specific standard(s) and supporting standard(s) that align with your lesson:

    • CCR Anchor 3: Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details and well-structured event sequences.

Prior Knowledge

Students must read and write at the 9th grade level; have the ability to navigate the Internet, and type into a Word processor.

Lesson Author & License

  • Lesson Author: Suzanne Ensmann (Modified for Adult Ed students; original .01 Ideas Lesson Plan created by  Albion Movie, Inc.:

    "BROUGHT TO YOU BY OUR SPONSOR

    Our lesson plans are available at no cost to educators, thanks to the generosity of our education sponsor. Please visit the Bradenton Gulf Islands on Florida’s Gulf Coast"). Bradenton Anna Maria Island Longboat Key

Module Preparation

Relevance to Practice

Students need to see relevance for the subjects they are taking. These writing lessons provide relevant examples of how writing may be used to create a screenplay creating the first step in a movie production. Students will see how professional writers brainstorm after researching history and literature to come up with ideas for movies which places their schoolwork into the realm of future potential careers.

Guide the students to follow the module and relate how this writing experience is how movies begin.

Section 1: Read - Learning Objectives & Lesson Overview

This lesson is to foster an understanding of how screenplay ideas are written, developed and supported with events, characters, dialogue, and other elements.

 

Learner Audience / Primary Users

Adult, 9th-12th grade reading level , non-traditional student working towards achieving a high school diploma

 

Addresses: College & Career Readiness Standards (CCRS) Alignment

  • Level: Adult Education

  • Grade Level: CCRS Grade Level E (9-12 grade reading level)

  • Subject: CCRS English Language Arts

  • Strand: CCRS Writing Strand

      • Sub-strand: Writing of Literature, History/Social Studies, or Technical subjects

  • Standard Description: CCRS description(s) for the specific standard(s) and supporting standard(s) that align with your lesson:

    • CCR Anchor 3: Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details and well-structured event sequences.

Prior Knowledge

Students must read and write at the 9th grade level; have the ability to navigate the Internet, and type into a Word processor.

Lesson Author & License

  • Lesson Author: Suzanne Ensmann (Modified for Adult Ed students; original .01 Ideas Lesson Plan created by  Albion Movie, Inc.).

Learning Objectives

By the end of this lesson, you should be able to:

  • Research historical events and brainstorm to think of a screenplay idea.

  • Write a screenplay idea based upon real or imagined experiences or events.

  • Develop and support your idea with details about sequential events, characters and dialogue to create a short film script.

Overview

Screenwriters get their ideas from many sources. Sometimes they think of ideas on their own. Often, however, they are inspired by other media like books or television. It is important to remember that “borrowing” an idea is not a bad thing. Humans are very good at learning from one another, and screenwriters are no exception.

Ideas for screenplays come at strange times and unusual places. Screenwriters have mentioned that they get their ideas from conversations with friends, a phrase in a book or movie, something they have seen while taking a walk, or even in dreams. When the ideas pop up, screenwriters try to write them down quickly so they don’t forget them. The same is true for events in a movie, characters, and dialogue. Some screenwriters keep a pencil and some paper with them nearly all the time so they can capture their ideas whilst they are fresh.

A list of sources for initial screenplay ideas is shown under the fist Task in Step 1 but there may even be some other sources that you can think of. The important thing to keep in mind is that screenwriters are good at thinking up ideas on their own, as well as borrowing ideas from other media.

Research plays a critical role in the proper development of a screenplay idea. Any time a writer can introduce their audience to a new, interesting world or perspective, the reader is more engaged. Researching allows the writer to discover rich details and nuances that might otherwise have been omitted, leaving the script more hollow and flat.

Albion Ideas 1

Key Terms and Concepts

  • Brainstorming is taking the research on history, events, other stories, or experiences to create more ideas.

  • Screenplays are ideas written into a story format.  

  • A good screenplay is developed and supported with detail, introduces events sequentially, and creates characters and dialogue to create a short film script.

Section 2: Read & Watch - Introduction

Time: 5 minutes

Screenplay Ideas to be shared with students in Introduction. 

Time: 5 minutes

ALBION was written and directed by 23-year-old Harvard University student, Castille Landon.

Screenwriters get their ideas from many sources. Sometimes they think of ideas on their own. Often, however, they are inspired by other media like books or television. It is important to remember that “borrowing” an idea is not a bad thing. Humans are very good at learning from one another, and screenwriters are no exception.

Ideas for screenplays come at strange times and unusual places. Screenwriters have mentioned that they get their ideas from conversations with friends, a phrase in a book or movie, something they have seen while taking a walk, or even in dreams. When the ideas pop up, screenwriters try to write them down quickly so they don’t forget them. The same is true for events in a movie, characters, and dialogue. Some screenwriters keep a pencil and some paper with them nearly all the time so they can capture their ideas while they are fresh.

In the Warm Up you were provided with a list of sources for initial screenplay ideas.  There may even be some other sources that you can think of. The important thing to keep in mind is that screenwriters are good at thinking up ideas on their own, as well as borrowing ideas from other media.

Research plays a critical role in the proper development of a screenplay idea. Any time a writer can introduce their audience to a new, interesting world or perspective, the reader is more engaged. Researching allows the writer to discover rich details and nuances that might otherwise have been omitted, leaving the script more hollow and flat.

Albion: The Enchanted Stallion 3-Minute Teaser. How did this screenplay evolve?

Section 3: Participate - Warm-Up

This lesson focuses on guiding students how to write a screenplay. After researching Literature, History/Social Studies, or Technical subjects students will then brainstorm to write and develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details and well-structured event sequences, developed and supported with events, characters, and dialogue.

Warm-Up

Time: 5 minutes

As a group activity, have the students follow the first step to name some familiar movies and try to figure out where the ideas came from. If have time, continue the discussion by reversing the process and asking students to think of movies for each source on the list. If necessary, provide students with information you know about the source of different screenplay ideas. Promote a discussion of how some features of the source appear in the movie but some do not.

 

Time: 5 minutes

Join with two other classmates to name some familiar movies and try to figure out where the ideas came from for them. If you have time, continue the discussion by reversing the process and think of movies for each source on the list below.

Use a shared word processing document, such as Google Docs, to begin collecting your ideas and submit a link to your instructor.

Screenplay Writing Sources

A list of sources for screenplay ideas is shown below. There may even be some other sources that you can think of. The important thing to keep in mind is that screenwriters are good at thinking up ideas on their own and borrowing ideas from other media

     SOURCE       

Original Idea         

 Real Life

Novel Adaptation

Television Show

Sequel

Prequel

Spin-Off

Re-Make

Knock-Off

Parody

Toys

Video Game

      SCREENPLAY TITLE

Star Wars

Apollo 13

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone

Dukes of Hazard

The Empire Strikes Back (from Star Wars)

The Force Awakens (from Star Wars)

Catwoman (from Batman)

King Kong

Sound of Music (from a foreign film)

Not Another Teen Movie

Transformers

Lara Croft: Tomb Raide

 

Sources for Additional Research:

• Internet research screenplay idea.

• Family or friends with knowledge of the topic

• Recognized experts in the field of interest

• Library

• Visits to locations

Section 4: Listen - Demonstration

Presentation to be shared with students.

Time: 5 minutes

Castille Landon, the Director and Writer for ALBION, tells us how she got her ideas for the movie:

  1. FROM MY OWN EXPERIENCES: I grew up around horses and always dreamed of having a magical horse whisk me to a mystical land. In my script, I turned my fantasy into Evie’s reality.

  2. BY INCORPORATING MY EMOTIONS: I never felt like I was one of the “cool, hip, rich” kids that frequented my school or the riding stable where I practiced. So, I made Evie an outcast who becomes a hero.

  3. IRISH FOLKLORE: I love history and folklore. Greek and Roman folklore are taught in nearly every school and appear regularly in movies (think: Spartacus, Hercules). But I wanted something different. So, I used Irish folklore, and was especially fascinated with the legends of the kelpie. I did extensive Internet research on the characters and storylines in Irish legends and then adapted them into my own characters and my own storyline.

  4. ADDITIONAL WRITERS: After creating my first draft script, I brought in Sarah Scougal and Ryan O’Nan (writer for Marvel’s X-Men) to develop the script into the powerhouse we have today.      
The Legend of the Kelpie

Here more about Castille's inspiration and making of a movie here

Section 5: Research - Internet

03 INTERNET RESEARCH

  • Have students follow module to search for information about the inspiration for movies with which they are familiar. You may broaden the activity by assigning the students to look up classic movies.

  • Have them list a Movie with the corresponding Inspiration(s) and cite their work.

  • Have students submit their work to instructor.

Guided Practice

Time: 5 minutes

Search for information about the inspiration for movies with which you are familiar. 

  • Write down a movie or two with the corresponding Inspiration(s) from where it came from and cite your work.

  • Submit your work to your instructor.

    Albion Ideas 3

Section 6: Apply - Begin Script Writing Project

Application - 02 SCRIPT WRITING PROJECT

Time: 10 minutes

Have the students folllow module to work independently or in small teams of three. If they work as teams, they can act as co-writers of a single script, or utilize the group as a writers’ room to bounce ideas off of each other while developing their scripts individually.

Their task will be to think of a screenplay idea that they would like to develop. Have them consider which source(s) they will use to develop their screenplay idea. What additional resources should they investigate to more fully develop their ideas and add detail to the story?

Each team has to think of a story, choose a title, and write a simple bulleted list of their ideas. Remind the students that they do not have to be completely faithful to the source. Ask the students to consider which aspects of the source might appear in the movie, parts that would not, and new content that might be added. Give each group an opportunity to share their screenplay idea and source with the class.

Have students submit application included research list to instructor. Use rubric to grade.

Time: 10 minutes

Follow your instructor's direction to work independently or in small teams of three. If you work as a team, you can act as co-writers of a single script, or utilize the group as a writers’ room to bounce ideas off of each other while developing your script individually.

Your task is to think of a screenplay idea that you would like to develop. Consider which source(s) you will use to develop your screenplay idea. What additional resources should you investigate to more fully develop your idea and add detail to the story?

Each team (or person) has to think of a story, choose a title, and write a simple bulleted list of your ideas. Remember, you do not have to be completely faithful to the source. Consider which aspects of the source might appear in the movie, parts that would not, and new content that might be added. Your instructor may give you an opportutnity to share your screenplay idea and source with the class!

Submit your application included with your research list to instructor. Use rubric to grade.

Evaluation Rubric for Practice above and Application

Ideas .01 Rubric

Section 7: Develop - Your Story!

Advanced students can move into writing the screenplay and creating a storyboard with the Web 2.0 resources in this section.

Or, take your class further and have the students complete the Screenplay by completing all the lessons here: http://albionmovie.com/writing-workshop.html 

Your instructor may take you on to further this skill, but you can start writing your story too!

When you have the idea, map it out with pictures in a story board next!

You can be the next screenplay writer of a popular movie!

Albion Ideas 3

 

Section 8: Explore - Supplementary Resources

Have advanced students explore this section.

ALBION: THE ENCHANTED STALLION is the first installment of a trilogy involving the world of ALBION. The film is due to be released in theatres in the Fall of 2016 and is a fantasy film in the vein of Wizard of Oz meets Game of Thrones. ALBION is about a girl named Evie who finds a magical stallion and is whisked away to another world, where she finds that she, alone, is the key to saving an entire race of people.

Interested students can learn more about ALBION, including entering the ALBION Essay Contest, at www.AlbionMovie.com.

Explore the world of Evie in Albion: http://albionmovie.com/index.html 

Albion Ideas 5

 

Section 9: Further - References & Attribution

Have advanced students explore this section.

Albion Movie, Inc. (2016). Albion Writing Workshop - Albion: The Enchanted Stallion. Retrieved May 4, 2016, from http://albionmovie.com/writing-workshop.html.

Albion Movie, Inc. (2016). Albion: The Enchanted Stallion 3-Minute Teaser on Vimeo. Retrieved May 3, 2016, from https://vimeo.com/157465468.

This lesson has been modified for Adult Ed students; original .01 Ideas Lesson Plan created by  Albion Movie, Inc.).

Attribution Statements

The Albion Enchanted Stallion 3-Minute Teaser on Vimeo was created by Albion Movie, Inc. and published at https://vimeo.com/157465468 is copyrighted and is not licensed under an open license. Embedded as permitted by Albion Movie, Inc.:

"BROUGHT TO YOU BY OUR SPONSOR

Our lesson plans are available at no cost to educators, thanks to the generosity of our education sponsor. Please visit the Bradenton Gulf Islands on Florida’s Gulf Coast"

Bradenton Anna Maria Island Longboat Key

Albion Ideas 6