Author:
Ann Spencer
Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Module
Level:
Graduate / Professional
Tags:
ALA Standards, Co-teaching, Collaboration, Collaborative Instruction, ISLLC Standards, Instructional Collaboration, Librarian, Librarian/classroom Teacher Collaboration, Principal, School Administration Competency, School Librarian Competency, School Librarian Preparation, school-librarian-preparation
License:
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States
Language:
English
Media Formats:
Downloadable docs, Video
Creating librarian-teacher partnerships: Roles of school principals and school librarians

Creating librarian-teacher partnerships: Roles of school principals and school librarians

Module Overview

This module offers school principals and school librarians the opportunity to build and strengthen understanding and skills toward collaborative instruction with the school librarian and classroom faculty. This module is also appropriate for graduate candidates in school leadership and/or school librarian programs.

This module is based on the British University learning model. In England, Small groups of learners meet once a week with a "tutor" - AKA professor to discuss relevant topics, share their work, submit assignments and get feedback. While the faculty suggests resources, learners are expected to conduct research to find their own. This model is especially applicable to school library and school principal candidates who need to build research skills for on-going professional development in the field. Librarians, of course, always need to hone their research skills.

Like the British model, learning for this program is largely self-guided. Resources are provided for the learner to develop expertise demonstrated in three major assignments: a white paper, a tri-fold pamphlet, and an analysis of a case study.

Candidates must demonstrate and justify competence in targeted ISLLC and ALA Standards to successfully complete the module. This competence is assessed by a rubric used by the candidate for self-assessment and by faculty for performance assessment .

Because the learning for this module is largely self-guided, faculty needs to be available for consultation through regularly scheduled office hours and email. The goal of this consultation is to provide coaching and explanation. Faculty will use the Discussion Board Task as formative assessment to guide facilitated instruction and coaching. Summative assessment is demonstrated by the three artifacts produced in the module.

Module Preparation

Familiarize yourself with specific language of the competency rubrics.

Determine through reflection and conversations with colleagues exactly what the rubric criteria indicates so you know it when you see it and can provide coaching and guidance when you don't.

Familiarize yourself with the resources on the list provided to candidates.

Develop a list of your own recommended resources. Modify candidate list as you deem appropriate.

Understand the relationship between each assignment and the competencies.

Post schedule and protocol/norms for the learning community working through this module.

Build competence in online pedagogy. Resources are provided below.

Section 1: Initial Self-Assessment Using Competency Standards Rubric

This assignment asks candidates to reflect in response to several queries to lead them to consider their current level of competence SP ISLLC Standard and ALA Standards.

Instructor Notes: You will need to assign a due date for these reflective paragraphs.

A follow-up discussion board assignment asks Candidates to share insights gained from their self-reflection.

See Assessment for Self-Reflection Rubric included in Instructor Resources.

Opening

Reflective paragraphs: Consideration of Competency Standards in Your Practice

ISLLC Standard 2: Education leaders champion and support instruction and assessment that maximizes student learning and achievement. 
   2c. Identify evidence-based instructional strategies to strengthen existing  
       methods or to implement new ones. 

ALA Standard Domain 3: Instruction
   Component 3e: Demonstrating Flexibility and Responsiveness Elements: Teaching   
   strategies • Lesson adjustments • Response to students • Persistence

Distinguished The School Principal regularly assesses instructional practices and builds teacher capacity to implement a variety of practices that are relevant to student needs and interests, research based, and based on academic rigor and strategies that supports the learning of all students The school librarian uses a repertoire of diverse strategies in seeking ways to ensure successful learning for all students. The school librarian makes adjustments to instructional plans and provides interventions as needed and responds to opportunities arising from spontaneous events to accommodate students’ learning styles, needs, interests, abilities and questions.

Proficient The School Principal assesses instructional practices, identifies a few practices that are research-based, rigorous and relevant that will be implemented school-wide and supports teacher development around those practices The school librarian uses some diverse strategies in seeking ways to ensure successful learning for all students. The school librarian usually makes adjustments to instructional plans and provides interventions as needed and sometimes responds to opportunities arising from spontaneous events to accommodate students learning styles, needs, interests, abilities and questions.

Emerging The School Principal measures the quality of instructional practices and attempts to articulate research based and rigorous strategies for improving instructional practices The school librarian attempts to accommodate students’ learning styles, needs, abilities, interests and questions but the use of diverse strategies is limited. Responding to spontaneous events is rare.

Please examine the School Principal and School Librarian competencies above. Reflect on the following queries. Your reflection on each query will be at least two paragraphs. When necessary, use terminology familiar to those in the education, school administration, and school librarian communities. Your reflection is written for an audience of yourself and your peers in both areas. While you will not be asked to share your personal reflection, you will be sharing insights in a discussion board. This reflection document is due on _.

  1. Consider the competency component for your area. What does it mean to you? How would you “translate” the component into your understanding? Visualize some examples of co-workers that have demonstrated all or part of this standard. What do they do? What specific behaviors to they show?

  2. At what level is your current practice? Why do you think this? What do you do that demonstrates your current competence in this standard? What evidence would you have to justify your self-assessment?

  3. School Librarians recognize the Information Search Process (ISP) as the model for the learner’s experience of seeking information uses the resources facilitated by a library. (See https://comminfo.rutgers.edu/~kuhlthau/informationsearchprocess.htm). As a future principal or librarian, consider how this model relates to the characteristics and actions described in your standard? How would this model inform the demonstration of this standard in your practice?

a. For Librarian Candidates: How would you lead your principal to understand this process for the instructional benefit of your learner/patrons?

b. For Principal Candidates: How would you lead your faculty to understand this process for the instructional benefit of your school’s learners?

Section 2: Using resources to build competence

Finding and using resources is the primary work of this module. As described above, candidates need to find and use resources to build understandings in instructional collaboration, advocacy, school reform, adult behavior change, and creating buy in. Your role is to support, and when necessary, guide their research and suggest useful resources.

In the unusual case that a candidate lacks research skills, you may need to do some private remediation based on your own experience and expertise. Resources for this remediation follow.

Using these resources, discussion board posts and responses, and your guidance and feedback, candidates will build sufficient understanding, skills, and knowledge to complete the three performance assessments.

Work Time

Suggested resources are attached below. Your faculty will also guide you with some suggestions. Use these resources as a springboard to help you find others. Conversations and interviews with people knowShare your resources with each other as you find them to build a shared bibliography for your future professional work.

Section 3: Discussion Board

Discussion Boards should be held weekly and required. Responses to candidates are also required. They should be due two or three days after the original posts. Candidates must respond to two colleagues. Criteria for Discussion Board Rigor is found on the rubric. Discussion Board topics or questions are the purview of the instructor based on the following suggestions:

  • Topics candidates need to consider to create collaborative relationships between librarians and faculty. These topics should surface in the candidates’ research to complete the summative assessment assignments. This discussion board is an opportunity for you to emphasize nuances of the topic and deepen candidates’ understanding.
  • Critical questions about content areas that you wish to assess formatively.
  • Topics candidates misunderstand

Formative Assessment

Discussion board prompts will be posted weekly by your faculty. Your two paragraph response must be thoughtful, referenced and specific to the prompt. It is expected that you will respond with at least one paragraph to two colleagues. Your response needs to relate to and expand upon your colleagues’ posts. Use professional language relevant to education, administration, and librarianship. Refer to the attached rubric for specific criteria for Discussion Boards

Section 4: Brochure

In this assignment, both School Principal and School Librarian candidates demonstrate their understanding of the following:

  • Benefits to teachers from library/faculty collaboration
  • Persuasion
  • Models of Collaboration most likely to appeal to faculty

Performance Task

In this persuasive brochure aimed at faculty, you must succinctly and convincingly answer the following essential questions:

  • Why would a teacher want collaborate with a school librarian?
  • How can I persuade faculty to collaborate with the librarian?
  • What collaboration models are likely to appeal to and be easily understood by faculty?

Along with language, your brochure needs to contain at least three graphics that communicate faculty benefits and collaboration model. See the attached rubric for specific assignment criteria.

Section 5: White Paper

Candidates will write a white paper in support of building and/or increasing librarian/faculty instructional collaboration. School librarians will address their paper to the principal, who may or may not be supportive of collaboration. School principals will address their papers to department chairs.

Candidates may define the collaboration problem as they wish as long as the problem is clearly tied to collaboration research from juried sources. Candidates must make it evident that the problem is tied to learner achievement. The solution to the problem must be original and clearly tied to the candidate’s definition and description of the problem.

The white paper is both succinct and complex. Thorough understanding of the nuances of the problem/solution must be addressed. The short length requires rigorous understanding necessary to explain problems/pose solutions with clarity and simplicity. Cursory or poorly-considered thinking will be neither persuasive or demonstrate understanding and is therefore unacceptable.

White papers will define the specific instructional collaboration problem that needs to be solved; explain why it is a problem; examine various credible solutions; and demonstrate why the candidate’s solution is the best choice. The paper will be formatted with the following headers:

  • Introduction
  • Statement of Problem
  • Reasons for Problem
  • Support for Reasons
  • Possible Solutions
  • Support for Solutions
  • Proposed Solution
  • Advisability of Proposed Solution

The White Paper is no longer that five pages, suitable for a professional audience using clear language with educational terminology necessary for meaning. Extra jargon and verbiage diminishes the persuasiveness of the White Paper.

Performance Task

Candidates may define the collaboration problem as they wish as long as the problem is clearly tied to collaboration research from juried sources. Candidates must make it evident that the problem is tied to learner achievement. The solution to the problem must be original and clearly tied to the candidate’s definition and description of the problem.

White papers will define the specific instructional collaboration problem that needs to be solved; examine various credible solutions; and demonstrate why the candidate’s solution is the best choice. The paper will be formatted with the following headers:

  • Introduction
  • Statement of Problem
  • Reasons for Problem
  • Support for Reasons
  • Possible Solutions
  • Support for Solutions
  • Proposed Solution
  • Advisability of Proposed Solution

The White Paper is no longer that five pages, suitable for a professional audience using clear language with educational terminology necessary for meaning. Extra jargon and verbiage diminishes the persuasiveness of the White Paper.

Criteria for the White Paper is described in the attached Rubric.

Section 6: Case Study

This final assignment synthesizes all of candidate’s understanding and knowledge of creating a culture of instructional collaboration between school librarians and faculty. Candidates examine and solve the following case study. Solutions are referenced with juried resources as well as informal resources such as focus groups, interviews with principals/librarians/teachers, and other valid but less formal resources. It may be wise to require that all resources by approved by you early in the assignment.

While criteria for the case study is provided in the rubric below, there is no specified length or formatting. Rather, the case study serves to demonstrate proficient competency as indicated by the ISLLC Standards Rubric and the ALA standards rubric. The candidate’s final reflection provides the justification for his/her self-assessed level of competence.

Your feedback to the candidate regarding this assignment must be specific and specifically tied to the competency rubric using examples. Your assessment of competence must be tied to evidence from the candidate’s work. In all cases, it is recommended that your competency assessment of a candidate be a collaborative consensus from two or three educational professionals qualified to assess competence.

Performance Task

Carefully read and consider the attached case study. Your task is to assume the role of either School Principal or School Librarian and solve this real-life problem. As you create a solution, be very aware of the competencies you are demonstrating through your solution. Be able to justify your competency using this piece of evidence in your final self-assessment of competence.

While this situation is hypothetical, your solution must be grounded in best practice and theory as well as realistic, manageable, and measurable. Realistic contingency plans based on several likely stakeholder reactions must be considered and outlined in your solution. Your over-arching goal is to improve student achievement through your problem-solving.

Assessment criteria for this assignment is detailed in the case study rubric attached below as well as the ISLLC or ALA rubric available with resources listed at the beginning of the module.

Section 7: Final Self-Assessment, Justification, and Artifact Evidence to Demonstrate Competency

In this final reflective assignment, candidates self-assess their current level of competence, providing justification for their level of competency supported by evidence.

Closing

Using the Standards, determine your current level of competency. Justify your self-assessment of this level by explaining your understanding and skills evidenced by artifacts produced in this module.