Author:
Special Olympics Indiana
Subject:
Education, English Language Arts, Sociology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab, Lesson Plan
Level:
High School
Grade:
9, 10, 11, 12
Tags:
Community Influence, Epic, Erskine, Inclusion
License:
Creative Commons Attribution
Language:
English

Education Standards

Content of Your Character

Content of Your Character

Overview

In this lesson, students learn why it is important to have personal values. Students will identify a list of core values and discuss how to bring these values into their everyday life and communities.

Lesson Overview

Please adapt the lesson activity to fit your students' abilities and interests.

Introduction

In this lesson, students learn why it is important to have personal values. Students will identify a list of core values and discuss how to bring these values into their everyday life and communities. This lesson is tied to a video clip from the documentary "The Best We've Got: The Carl Erskine Story" that reflects the ten Erskine core values.

Grades 9 – 12

Themes

  • Core Values
  • Character Development
  • Community Impact

Objectives

During this lesson, students will:

  • Discuss the Special Olympics core values and reflect on how they can relate to their own lives.
  • Create a list of core values and define them.
  • Identify a core value to incorporate into everyday life.

Essential Questioning

Students should be able to answer these questions by the end of this lesson:

  • What is a personal/core value?
  • Why is it important to have core values?
  • What effect does the community around you have on your values?

Indiana Academic Standards

INSS.SOCIOLOGY.S.10.1

  • Describe traditions, roles and expectations necessary for a community to continue.

INSS.ELA-WRITING.9-10.W.3.3 and

INSS.ELA-WRITING.11-12.W.3.3

  • Write narrative compositions in a variety of forms that:
  1. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, a situation, or an observation, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters.
  2. Create a smooth progression of experiences or events.
  3. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plotlines to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
  4. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole.
  5. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.
  6. Provide an ending that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.

    Download the attached PDF document for complete lesson materials. 

    Download the attached Word version for fully accessible document.