Author:
Georgia Boatman
Subject:
Environmental Science, Education, Elementary Education, English Language Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab, Lesson Plan, Module, Reading
Level:
Lower Primary
Grade:
2
Tags:
ClimeTime, Dams, Earth Science, Erosion, Modeling, Science, Wa-science
License:
Creative Commons Attribution
Language:
English
Media Formats:
Downloadable docs, Graphics/Photos, Video

Education Standards

Second Grade Elementary Science and Integrated Subjects-How Can a Dam Change the Land Around It?

Second Grade Elementary Science and Integrated Subjects-How Can a Dam Change the Land Around It?

Overview

The Second Grade Elementary Framework for Science and Integrated Subjects, How Can Dams Change the Land Around Them, uses a local phenomena of impact of the Wanapum Dam on the Columbia River and a crack in that dam to understand erosion and changes in the landscape.  It is part of Elementary Framework for Science and Integrated Subjects project, a statewide Clime Time collaboration among ESD 123, ESD 105, North Central ESD, and the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. Development of the resources is in response to a need for research- based science lessons for elementary teachers that are integrated with English language arts, mathematics and other subjects such as social studies. The template for Elementary Science and Integrated Subjects  can serve as an organized, coherent and research-based roadmap for teachers in the development of their own NGSS aligned science lessons.  Lessons can also be useful for classrooms that have no adopted curriculum as well as to serve as enhancements for  current science curriculum. The EFSIS project brings together grade level teams of teachers to develop lessons or suites of lessons that are 1) pnenomena based, focused on grade level Performance Expectations, and 2) leverage ELA and Mathematics Washington State Learning Standards.

Standards, Phenomena, Big Ideas and Routines

Development Team:

Aislinn Bufi (ESD 105) and Trina Huntington (ESD123)

Second Grade

How can a dam change the land around it?

Frameworks for Elementary Science and Integrated Subjects are designed to be an example of how to develop a coherent lesson or suite of lessons that integrate other content areas such as English Language Arts, Mathematics and other subjects into science learning for students. The examples provide teachers with ways to think about all standards, identify anchoring phenomena, and plan for coherence in science and integrated subjects learning

Second Grade Disciplinary Core Ideas include PS1, PS2, PS3, LS1, LS2, ESS1, ESS2.

For ESS1, ESS2, students are expected to develop an understanding of:

  • The idea that wind and water can change the shape of the land
  • How to compare design solutions to slow or prevent such changes to the land
  • How to use information and models to identify and represent the shapes and kinds of land and bodies of water in an area
  • Where water is found on Earth

The Crosscutting Concepts are called out as organizing concepts for these disciplinary core ideas.

Crosscutting Concepts:

  • Patterns- patterns in the natural world can be observed. (2-ESS2-2) (2-ESS2-3)
  • Stability and change- things may change slowly or rapidly. (2-ESS1-1) (2-ESS2-1)

Students are expected to use the practices to demonstrate understanding of the core ideas.

Science and Engineering Practices:

  • Developing and using models
  • Constructing explanations and designing solutions
  • Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information

Performance Expectation(s)

Identify Performance Expectation(s) from Next Generation Science Standards that will be your focus (Climate Science related PEs preferred but not mandatory). Copy and paste below all the possible disciplinary core ideas and performance expectations that relate to your topic.

2-ESS1-1. Use information from several sources to provide evidence that Earth events can occur quickly or slowly. 

[Clarification Statement: Examples of events and timescales could include volcanic explosions and earthquakes, which happen quickly and erosion of rocks, which occurs slowly.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include quantitative measurements of timescales.]

2-ESS2-1. Compare multiple solutions designed to slow or prevent wind or water from changing the shape of the land.* [Clarification Statement: Examples of solutions could include different designs of dikes and windbreaks to hold back wind and water, and different designs for using

shrubs, grass, and trees to hold back the land.]

2-ESS2-2. Develop a model to represent the shapes and kinds of land and bodies of water in an area.  [Assessment Boundary:

Assessment does not include quantitative scaling in models.]

Science and Engineering Practices

Which SEPs will be a focus for investigating this topic/phenomenon?

Modeling in K–2 builds on prior experiences and progresses to include using and developing models (i.e., diagram, drawing, physical replica, diorama, dramatization, or storyboard) that represent concrete events or design solutions.

(2-ESS2-2) Develop a model to represent patterns in the natural world.

Constructing explanations and designing solutions in K–2 builds on prior experiences and progresses to the use of evidence and ideas in constructing evidence-based accounts of natural phenomena and designing solutions.

(2-ESS1-1) Make observations from several sources to construct an evidence-based account for natural phenomena.  

(2ESS2-1) Compare multiple solutions to a problem

Crosscutting Concepts

Which Crosscutting Concepts will be a focus for investigating this topic/phenomenon?

(2-ESS2-2) (2-ESS2-3) Patterns- patterns in the natural world can be observed.

(2-ESS1-1) (2-ESS2-1) Stability and change- things may change slowly or rapidly.

English Language Arts (ELA) Standards

How will I Integrate ELA Standards (which standard, what strategy…?)

RI.2.1 Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text. (2-ESS1-1)

RI.2.3 Describe the connection between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text. (2-ESS1-1) (2-ESS2-1)

RI.2.9 Compare and contrast the most important points presented by two texts on the same topic. (2-ESS2-1)

W.2.6 With guidance and support from adults, use a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing, including in collaboration with peers. (2-ESS2-3) (2-ESS1-1)

W.2.8 Recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question. (2-ESS2-3) (2-ESS1-1)

SL.2.2 Recount or describe key ideas or details from a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media. (2-ESS1-1)

SL.2.5 Create audio recordings of stories or poems; add drawings or other visual displays to stories or recounts of experiences when appropriate to clarify ideas, thoughts, and feelings. (2-ESS2-2)

Mathematics Standards

How will I Integrate Mathematics Standards?

MP.2 Reason abstractly and quantitatively. (2-ESS1-1) ) ( 2-ESS2-1) (2-ESS2-2)

MP.4 Model with mathematics. (2-ESS1-1) ( 2-ESS2-1) (2-ESS2-2)

MP.5 Use appropriate tools strategically. (2-ESS2-1)

2.NBT.A Understand place value. (2-ESS1-1)

2.NBT.A.3 Read and write numbers to 1000 using base-ten numerals, number names, and expanded form. (2-ESS2-2)

2.MD.B.5 Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve word problems involving lengths that are given in the same units, e.g., by using drawings (such as drawings of rulers) and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem. (2-ESS2-1)

Phenomena

How can a dam change the land around it?

The damming of the Columbia River with the Wanapum Dam and the subsequent changes to the land surrounding the river. Also examining the crack in the Wanapum Dam.

Phenomena Resources:

Communicating in Scientific Ways | OpenSciEd

Big Ideas

Which one of the ideas from the curriculum and the Standards now seems the most central - meaning they might help explain other ideas you’ve listed and explain a wide range of natural phenomena? You must use more than a name to express your idea, express it as a set of relationships. Explain your choice clearly enough so a colleague could understand why you made the choice you did.

How can a dam change the land around it?

  • Students will explore the idea that water can change the shape of the land. They will come to an understanding that these changes can happen quickly or slowly and sometimes they can be instigated by humans instead of nature.

 

Open Sci Ed Routines

OpenSciEd Routines

 

 

 

 

Lesson 1: Past and Present

Lesson 1: Past and Present

Materials

Preparation

In person

  • You may want to make an arrow on the map to show the location of your classroom.
  • If you are not having students write the own responses in their science notebook, print science notebook pages 1 &2 (enough for each student)
  • Print past and present pictures (enough for each student)
  • Prepare the lesson #1 Google Slides to present to class during lesson

Virtual

  • Share lesson #1 Google Slides with students
  • Share digital Science notebook with students
  • Suggestion: if using asynchronously, film a video teaching lesson as you would in person or record sound for the slides before sharing with students.

Vocabulary

  • No vocabulary words for this lesson, however if after reviewing the lesson there are words your students need to practice, feel free to add.

 

Integration Points

  • Look for integration points for English Language Arts and Mathematics within the procedures below. They will be noted in italics and dark blue.

Procedures

  1. Show students slide 1 in Google Slides, explain that the picture they see is the area they are going to be learning about in the next 6 lessons.
  2. Show students slide 3 in Google Slides. Explain that the place they are going to be learning about is called Vantage, Washington. It is located in Central Washington, right where they see the red star on the map.  Point out where your classroom/school would be located on the map on the map.
  3. Show students slide 4 in Google Slides and give them some time to look carefully at the picture. Explain that these are pictures of the Columbia near Vantage, Washington.
  4. Show students slide 5 in Google Slides and give them some time to look carefully at the picture.
  5. Show students slide 6 in Google Slides and tell them that those pictures are of the same location.
  6. Ask students to share with the class what they notice about the pictures, then have them write down 2 things that they notice in their science notebooks.
  7. Ask students to share with the class what they wonder about the pictures, then have them write down 2 things that they wonder about in their science notebooks.  (SL2.2)
  8. Show students slide 7 in Google Slides and pass out past and present pictures to each student. Tell students that these pictures are all the same place. Ask students to sort the pictures into two groups. They will come up with their own sorting criteria, try not to intervene too much. *note: if using the digital version, make a copy of slide 10 (end of presentation) for student partner groups and have them, 1) type their names on the slide and then click and drag pictures to sort pictures on Google Slides.

Formative Assessments:

  • Observe the types of groups students make as they sort cards
  • Ask them to explain their reasoning in how they grouped the cards
  • Make a note of anything they may not have noticed and push further on the shape of the river, width of the banks, position of the bridge.
  1. After students have finished sorting the pictures, have them take a quick walk around the classroom and observe how their classmates have sorted the pictures. Ask them to think about how people sorted them in a way that is similar to theirs or different than theirs.
  2. Show students slide 8 and using science notebook page 2 have them write down an explanation of why they sorted the pictures the way that they did. Ideally students should write at least 2 sentences.  (W2.8)
  3. End the lesson by having students share their explanations and have a class discussion about what they noticed about the pictures. Tell students that in the next lessons they will be learning more about this location and what caused the differences they saw in the pictures.  (SL2.2)

Formative Assessments:

  • Observing students share what they notice and wonder about the river, bridge, landscape
  • Look for but don’t address right now:
    •  misconceptions about the river and shape of the land

Lesson 2: Quick and Slow

Materials

Preparation

  • In person
    • Print science notebook pages 3-8 (enough for each student)
    • Prepare the lesson #2 Google Slides to present to class during lesson
  • Virtual
    • Share lesson #2 Google Slides with students
    • Share digital Science notebook with students
    • Suggestion: if using asynchronously, film a video teaching lesson as you would in person or record sound for the slides before sharing with students.

Vocabulary

  • Erosion: the carrying away of sand and soil due to water and wind.
  • Volcano: an opening in the Earth’s surface. Usually found in a mountain, the opening allows gas, hot magma and ash to escape from beneath the Earth’s crust.
  • Landslide: a large amount of earth, rock, and other material that moves down a steep slope.
  • Flood: an overflow of water on normally dry ground.
  • Sand dune: a hill of sand

 

Integration Points

Look for integration points for English Language Arts and Mathematics within the procedures below. They will be noted in italics and dark blue.

Procedures

  1. Show students slide 2 in Google Slides. Ask students to look at the two pictures from the last lesson again. Explain that this is the same location, just at different times. From looking at the picture, we can tell the land has changed. Ask them to think about their own experience. Have students find page 3 in their science notebooks and answer the question: What do you know about how land changes? (RI.2.1) (W.2.8)
  2. Show students slide 3 in Google Slides. Review vocabulary words with students before continuing.
  3. Show students slide 4 in Google Slides. Explain that in today's lesson students will be learning about how land can change over time. Tell them that land sometimes changes quickly. An example of a quick change is a volcano. Ask students to look carefully at the pictures on the slide and answer the questions on page 4 in their science notebooks. (R1.2.1) (W.2.8)
  4. Show students slide 5 in Google Slides. Tell students that a volcano isn’t the only way that land can change quickly. Landslides can also change the land quickly. Play the video of the landslide and have students answer the questions on page 5 in their science notebooks.
  5. Show students slide 6 in Google Slides. Tell students that a volcano and a landslide aren't the only ways that land can change quickly. Floods can also change the land quickly. Play the video of the flood and have students answer the questions on page 6 in their science notebooks. (R1.2.1 ) (W.2.8)
  6. Show students slide 7 in Google Slides. Explain that land can change quickly like they observed with the volcano, landslide and flood. But it can also change slowly. It is more difficult to observe the slow changes, but they are there.
  7. Show students slide 8. Tell students that they are going to observe how land can change slowly. An example of a slow change is a river. Show students the video and also ask students to look carefully at the pictures on the slide and answer the questions on page 7 in their science notebooks. . (R1.2.1 ) (W.2.8)
  8. Show students slide 9. Tell students that they are going to observe another way that land can change slowly. This example of a slow change is a wind blowing sand on a sand dune. Show students the video and have students answer the questions on page 7 in their science notebooks. . (R1.2.1 ) (W.2.8)
  9. Show students slide 10. Explain that now that they know more about how land can change quickly and slowly they are going to go back and reflect on their first thoughts on how land can change. Have students go back to page 3 in their science notebooks and draw a line of learning under where they wrote about what they know about land changing. After they have drawn their line of learning, have them write about what they now know about how land can change. If students need an extra challenge, ask them to give examples of how land can change over time.  (R1.2.1) (W.2.8)

End the lesson by explaining to students that they have only learned about some ways that land changes, land can change in other ways that they did not observe. Ask students to share their learning with the class or with a partner. Tell students that in the next lessons they will be learning more about Vantage, Washington and how the changes in the land there occurred.

Formative Assessments:

  • Each opportunity to write about the pictures and videos in this lesson can be a formative assessment opportunity to determine if students are getting the concept of quick changes and slow changes in the land.

Lesson 3: Changes

Materials

  • Amazing Structures: Dams by Rebecca Pettiford on Epic! Is one book option for reading to students.  It does require starting an account (link).  OR  use the article “Finding Out About Dams”  in resources for Lesson 3 Finding Out About Dams

Preparation

  • In person
    • Print science notebook pages 9 (enough for each student)
    • Obtain enough sticky notes for each student to have 2
    • Prepare a poster with the two questions
      • Why are dams important?
      • What do dams do?
    • Prepare the lesson #3 Google Slides to present to class during lesson
  • Virtual
    • Share lesson #3 Google Slides with students
    • Share digital Science notebook with students
    • Suggestion: if using asynchronously, film a video teaching lesson as you would in person or record sound for the slides before sharing with students.

Vocabulary

  • Model: something similar, but not exactly the same as a real thing. Models help us understand how the real thing actually works.
  • Dam: something built across a stream, a river, or an estuary to hold back water.
  • Columbia River: a large river running through Washington state

Integration Points

Look for integration points for English Language Arts and Mathematics within the procedures below. They will be noted in italics and dark blue.

Procedures

  1. Show students vocabulary slide, review vocabulary words that might be new to them. (L.2.4)
  2. Show students slide 3 in Google Slides and have them get ready to write on page 9 in their science notebooks. Explain that now that they know about how land changes they are going to look at the past and present pictures of Vantage, Washington again. By looking at the pictures, they can tell that the land changed. Ask students to use what they have learned so far to predict if they think the changes happened quickly or slowly. Challenge students to come up with reasoning for their predictions. Why do they think the river changed? Show students slide 4 while they write down their predictions. (W.2.1)
  3. Show students slide 5 in Google Slides. Ask students to talk with a partner about how the pictures of the river are different from the previous pictures. (SL.2.1)  Explain that the changes they see (river is narrower and straighter looking in the earlier picture) in the river were caused by something called a dam that was put in the river in the 1950’s-1960’s. Explain that a dam is something built across a river or stream that holds back water. Ask students to picture a river. The water moves, when something is placed in the river that doesn’t allow it to move does it stop moving? No, the water has to go somewhere, so it starts to move out rather than downstream.  That's why they observed that the river widened after the dam was put in.
  4. Move to slide 6 in Google slides and explain to students that they are going to watch part of a video to learn more about the Wanapum Dam. Play the video from the start to 2:03. (after the 2:03 minute mark the video goes into more detail about hydroelectric power, if you have time it would be good exposure for students, but it is not at a second grade level of understanding).
  • Read together or independently, the book, Amazing Structures: Dams by Rebecca Pettiford on Epic!  It does require starting an account (link).  OR use the article “Finding Out About Dams” in resources for Lesson 3 Finding Out About Dams (RI.2.1)
  1. Show students slide 8 in Google Slides and give them a sticky note. Ask them to answer the question, What does a dam do? When they have written down their answer they can put their sticky note on the poster. After every student has placed their sticky note, take time to read them to the class and sort them into groups that fit together. (see example poster).
  2. Show students slide 9 in Google Slides and give them a sticky note. Ask them to answer the question, Why are dams important? When they have written down their answer they can put their sticky note on the poster. After every student has placed their sticky note, take time to read them to the class and sort them into groups that fit together such as “save water”, “stop floods”, etc.. (W.2.8)

Formative Assessments:

  • Note the various student ideas on the post-its as you group them.  Look for any key ideas about what a dam does and why dams are important that may be missing.
  • Note any misconceptions about what a dam does and what they do that is important for us and address ideas in future lessons.
  1. Show students side 10 in Google Slides and explain that now that they know what caused the changes that they observed they will model the changes in the next lesson and think about how building the Wanapum Dam impacted the Columbia River.

Lesson 4: Modeling Changes

Materials

    • Shallow plastic tub
    • Sand
    • popsicle sticks
    • Water
    • Wood or book

Preparation

  • In person
    • Print science notebook pages 10 & 11 (enough for each student)
    • Prepare the lesson #4 Google Slides to present to class during lesson
    • Prepare model river if demonstrating, or provide the materials below for groups of four or 5 students.  You will just need enough materials for each group.
      • Fill shallow tub with sand or soil
      • Moisten sand enough to be able to shape a river
      • Using your hands or a popsicle stick, create a model river
      • Prop one end of the shallow tub up on a wooden block, binder or book to create a slope so the water will flow when poured in.
      • *You will pour water into the tub to model a river during the lesson
  • Virtual
    • Share lesson #4 Google Slides with students
    • Share digital Science notebook with students
    • Suggestion: if using asynchronously, film a video teaching lesson as you would in person or record sound for the slides before sharing with students.

Vocabulary

  • Model: Use the Google Slides to remind that a model is similar to the real thing and is used it to show what we know about the real thing, how that real thing might work and to represent a system (or parts of a system) under study.

Integration Points

Look for integration points for English Language Arts and Mathematics within the procedures below. They will be noted in italics and dark blue.

 

Procedures

  1. Show students slide 3 in Google Slides, explain that in the last lesson, they learned about the Wanapum Dam and how it was the cause of the change in the river. Today they will be modeling how the building the dam affected the river.
  2. Show students slide 4 in Google Slides and introduce the concept of models. Explain that models are similar to a real thing, but are not the same. Give the example of a model car. Scientists might use a model car to find out what would happen if you rolled a car down a hill, they probably wouldn’t use a real car to test that. It would be expensive and dangerous. Using a model would give them an idea of what might happen and how the car would work in that scenario.  We use models all the time. In today's lesson students will get to see a physical model and create a drawing to model the Columbia River.

If you plan on creating your own physical model follow the procedures.  This could be a demonstration or students could do this investigation themselves.  If students are doing the investigation, talk about the way to pour the water, steadily and not too fast.

*it is recommended that you watch the video of the model (on slides 6 & 8) before creating your own.

  1. Have students prepare page 10 in their science notebooks.
  2. Either using a document camera or having students gather around, make sure they can see the shallow tub with the model river that you prepared earlier.
  3. Ask students to make observations before the river starts flowing.
  4. Make sure your tub is tilted so the water will flow, placing your cup of water on the highest side of the tub, you will pour the water into the tub, creating a model river. It is important to pour just enough water so that students can see the river flow. You will need to use the model one more time to model what happens when there is a dam and if the river model is too wet it will not work.
  5. After students have observed the model river without a dam, they will draw a model (with guidance as needed) of the riverbed as a class.
  6. Show students slide 6, you do not have to play the video, but can if you wish to. Using the picture of the river before the dam as well as the observations students made, work together to draw a model. You can draw on the previously prepared poster paper, students will draw in their science notebooks. As you work together to draw the model, ask students to think about what features they see in the picture and the model and how they would represent them in a drawing (river, cliffs, hills, bridge,etc.) Once the model is complete make sure to and label everything with your class. If time allows they can add color.  Students should write an explanation on their model of what is happening with the model river and why they think that is happening. (RI.2.3)
  7. Have students return to observing the river model either by gathering around it or under the document camera or using their own group stream table models. This time, tell students they are going to observe a river with a dam built on it. Add a popsicle stick or other obstacle near the end of the river to model a dam. Make sure your tub is tilted so the water will flow, placing your cup of water on the highest side of the tub, you will pour the water into the tub, creating a model river.
  8. Ask students what they observed this time, when there was a dam on the river. Was it similar or different than when there was no dam?  (SL.2.1) (SL.2.2)
  9. After students have observed the model river with a dam, you will draw a model of the riverbed as a class.
  10. Show students slide 8, you do not have to play the video, but can if you wish to. Using the picture of the river after the dam was built, as well as the observations students made, work together to draw a model. You will draw on the previously prepared poster paper, students will draw in their science notebooks. As you work together to draw the model, ask students to think about what features they see in the picture and the model and how they would represent them in a drawing (river, cliffs, hills, bridge,etc.) once the model is complete make sure to go through and label everything with your class. If time allows they can add color.

If you plan on using the video of the physical model use the following procedures.

  1. Have students prepare page 10 in their science notebooks.
  2. Show students slide 6, play the video of the model river without a dam. Have students carefully observe what they see. Using the picture of the river before the dam as well as the observations students made, work together to draw a model. You will draw on the previously prepared poster paper, students will draw in their science notebooks. As you work together to draw the model, ask students to think about what features they see in the picture and the model and how they would represent them in a drawing (river, cliffs, hills, bridge,etc.) once the model is complete make sure to go through and label everything with your class. If time allows they can add color.
  1. Show students slide 8, play the video of the model river with a dam. Have students carefully observe what they see. Using the picture of the river before the dam as well as the observations students made, work together to draw a model. You will draw on the previously prepared poster paper, students will draw in their science notebooks. As you work together to draw the model, ask students to think about what features they see in the picture and the model and how they would represent them in a drawing (river, cliffs, hills, bridge,etc.) once the model is complete make sure to go through and label everything with your class. If time allows they can add color. Students should write explanations of what they think is happening in the river now and why on their model. (RI.2.3)

Whether  if you used the video to observe the river model or you made your own river model, continue the lesson as written below

  1. Have students carefully observe the two model drawings that they made. As a whole group, table group or in partners, have them discuss what is the same about the two models. Then have students write up to three things that they saw that were similar.
  2. Have students carefully observe the two model drawings that they made. As a whole group, table group or in partners, have them discuss what is different about the two models. Then have students write up to three things that they saw that were different.
  3. Finally, have a class discussion about how building a dam affects a river and come up with a sentence or two as a class to write down in students' science notebooks.  (W.2.8)

Formative Assessment:

  • Look for students to write about the river being narrower before the dam and water widening out or pooling after the dam.
  • Look for students to discuss changes in the riverbed as the water may be diverted around the dam or to other places in the table
  1. To end the lesson, tell students that they have learned about how land can change quickly and slowly. We learned that the Columbia River changed relatively quickly and unlike most of the changes we observed, the changes were caused by humans. In the next lesson they will be learning about another important event in the Columbia River’s history and how it further impacted the community around the river.

Lesson 5: Changes in Wanapum Dam

Materials

Preparation

  • In person
    • Print science notebook pages 12-14 (enough for each student)
    • Print Sudden Changes pictures (enough for each student)
    • Prepare the lesson #5 Google Slides to present to class during lesson
  • Virtual
    • Share lesson #5 Google Slides with students
    • Share digital Science notebook with students
    • Suggestion: if using asynchronously, film a video teaching lesson as you would in person or record sound for the slides before sharing with students.

Vocabulary

  • Sudden- occurring or done quickly and unexpectedly or without warning.
  • Cause- make something happen
  • Effect- a change which is result of an action or other cause
  • Reservoir- lake or pond created by a dam
  • Spillway- channel used to move excess water around a dam so it doesn’t spill over the top

Integration Points

Look for integration points for English Language Arts and Mathematics within the procedures below. They will be noted in italics and dark blue.

Procedures

  1. Show the Lesson 5 presentation.
  2. Show students slide 2 in Google Slides. Go over the vocabulary that will be presented: sudden, cause, effect, reservoir, and spillway.
  3. Show students slide 3 in Google Slides and give them some time to look carefully at the picture (page 12).
  4. Have students write what they notice in their science notebook (page 12). (W.2.8)
  5. Have students make predictions on what they think is the cause of what they see in the photos.
  1.  Cause and Effect:  Present the screen and have students write on post-it notes what they think are the cause and effects of the crack in the Wanapum Dam or complete the Cause/Effect T-Chart in their notebooks. (RI.2.3) (W.2.8)
  2. End the lesson by having students share their explanations and have a class discussion about what they noticed about the pictures. Tell students that in the next lesson there will be a design challenge.

Formative Assessment:

  • Look for students to identify cause of mathematical error or construction errors, to much water pressure.  They might list other causes such as earthquake, or explosions but those have been ruled out.
  • Look for students to identify effects such as the crack growing, floods, erosion, no water for crops or other human uses.

 

Lesson 6: Modeling to Understand Problems

Materials

Preparation

  • In person
    • Print science notebook pages 14 (enough for each student)
    • Prepare the lesson #6 Google Slides to present to class during lesson
    • Cut a slit down the side of the styrofoam cup (mimics the crack in the dam)
  • Virtual
    • Share lesson #6 Google Slides with students
    • Share digital Science notebook with students
    • Suggestion: if using asynchronously, film a video teaching lesson as you would in person or record sound for the slides before sharing with students.

Vocabulary- No new vocabulary

 

Integration Points

Look for integration points for English Language Arts and Mathematics within the procedures below. They will be noted in italics and dark blue.

Procedures

  1. Present Lesson 6 presentation. Briefly reintroduce the engineering problem by reading the scenario.

 “On February 27, 2014, a 2-inch wide crack was discovered on one of the 65 feet tall concrete columns that make up the spillway of the dam. “

  1. Tell the students that today they will be creating a model of what would happen to the land around the Wanapum Dam if the crack is NOT fixed. They are to consider the land in the reservoir above the dam, and the land and water below the dam.
  2. Using the map and science notebook, draw and write thoughts on what would happen if the dam was not repaired. In the next step, students will be modeling a dam. (W.2.8)
  3. Create a model using a styrofoam cup with a cut on the side to model the dam. The cup itself represents the dam, the center of the cup represents the reservoir, and the cut in the side represents the crack.
  1. Cut a styrofoam cup from top.
  2. Place cup in tray to collect water.
  3. Pour 1 bottle of water into the cup.
  4.  Record your findings.
  5. Have students use the map to mark their ideas of where the water would be higher or lower, and what the areas of land would look like, and write a brief description. If time allows they can add color. Students should add explanations to their model. (W.2.8)
  6. Discuss with partners to discuss findings and ideas. (SL.2.1)
  7. Have students take the feedback from their partner to consider other elements to add to their design and make adjustments.

 

 

Lesson 7: Reporter News

This is the final compilation of learning to be demonstrated to others in presenting information and data through multimedia.

Materials

  • Lesson #7 Google Slides document
  • Science notebook pages 20 & 21 (digital or print)
  • Video recording device: iPad, camera, Chromebook

Preparation

  • In person
    • Print science notebook pages 20-21 (enough for each student)
    • Prepare the lesson #7 Google Slides to present to class during lesson
  • Virtual
    • Share lesson #7 Google Slides with students
    • Share digital Science notebook with students
    • Suggestion: if using asynchronously, film a video teaching lesson as you would in person or record sound for the slides before sharing with students.

Vocabulary- No new vocabulary

Integration Points

Look for integration points for English Language Arts and Mathematics within the procedures below. They will be noted in italics and dark blue.

Integration Points

Look for integration points for English Language Arts and Mathematics within the procedures below. They will be noted in italics and dark blue.

Procedures

  1. Present Lesson 7 presentation.
  2. Watch the ECK News report.
  3. Tell the students that today they will be working together to create a news report video, like that they would see on the daily news. They are to be reporting:

“You are a reporter for the local news. You have just been handed the task of reporting the findings of the crack in the Wanapum Dam. You are to report this for the daily TV news giving facts, possible predictions of what the land would look like if the dam were not fixed.”

Be sure to include:

    •  the finding of the crack in the dam,
    • the possible changes to the land around the dam if the crack were left unrepaired.
    • include models of the land in the reservoir above the dam, and the land and water below the dam.
  1. Have students work together to create a video using their device, props, their model design.
  2. Finally, present videos to share.  (SL.2.5) (W.2.6)

Summative Assessment:

  • the finding of the crack in the dam,
  • the possible changes to the land around the dam if the crack were left unrepaired.
  • include models of the land in the reservoir above the dam, and the land and water below the dam.

CELEBRATE your award winning news reporting!!

Appendix: Lesson Resources

2nd Grade How Can Dams Change the Land Around Them?  Google Drive

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1j9uJ-KypviwPP7lE0xQqichYe4-lU5H2Mjzz2tipXs4/edit?usp=sharing  

Attribution

Cover photo by Arthur Keubel

NGSS Lead States. 2013. Next Generation Science Standards: For States, By States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press | Public License

Common Core State Standards © Copyright 2010. National Governors Association Center for Best Practices and Council of Chief State School Officers. All rights reserved | Public License

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