Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
High School
Grade:
12
Provider:
Pearson
Tags:
Asylum, Grade 12 ELA, Reports
License:
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0
Language:
English

Clarifying Arguments

Clarifying Arguments

Lesson Overview

Whom should we let in? This lesson is a repeat of the last lesson, with the cases of two different teenagers presented. After the class listens to the cases and decisions, you will clarify your students’ argument assignments.

Lesson Preparation

  • Read the lesson and student content.
  • Anticipate student difficulties and identify the differentiation options you will choose for working with your students.

Section 1: Argument Rubric

  • Details of the Grade 12 Argument Rubric should be clear, but you may know of some sections where students need help or reminders.
    • SWD: Rubrics are often written in language that can be hard to understand. Offer extra support so that all students can do this activity meaningfully.

Opening

  • If you have any questions about the Grade 12 Argument Rubric for the argument essay assignment, this is the time to ask them.

Section 2: Case 5345B (Beatriz)

  • Time the activities for Case 5345B (Beatriz).
  • To ensure enough time during the period, keep accurate time.
  • If a student or group’s presentation takes well under 5 minutes, ask the student or group questions.
    • ELL: Encourage other students to be patient if the pace of some ELLs is slower than that of native speakers, and explain that listening attentively is one way in which we show we care for others.

Work Time

Present Case 5345B (Beatriz).

  • The defense team has a maximum of 5 minutes.
  • The prosecution team has a maximum of 5 minutes.
  • Beatriz is put on the stand and is questioned by the policy board for a maximum of 5 minutes.
  • The policy board deliberates and announces its decision.
  • If you are not presenting, take careful notes for the argument essay.

Open Notebook

Section 3: Case 9292TH (Sargon)

  • Time the activities for Case 9292TH (Sargon).
  • To ensure enough time during the period, keep accurate time.
  • If a student or group’s presentation takes well under 5 minutes, ask the student or group questions.

Work Time

Present Case 9292TH (Sargon).

  • The defense team has a maximum of 5 minutes.
  • The prosecution team has a maximum of 5 minutes.
  • Sargon is put on the stand and is questioned by the policy board for a maximum of 5 minutes.
  • The policy board deliberates and announces its decision.
  • If you are not presenting, take careful notes for the argument essay.

Open Notebook

Section 4: Argument Essay

  • Students should be prepared to write arguments for granting asylum to one of the teenagers and arguments for not granting asylum to another of them.
  • Point out the importance of audience, tone, claims, and counterclaims in an argument essay. It may be helpful to review these terms.
  • You will give students final instructions during the Opening of Lesson 23. After reflecting on the presentations, you can decide whether to name the specific teenagers you want students to write about or to allow each student to choose.

Closing

Listen and take notes as your teacher gives you instructions for the argument essay.

  • Jot down your intended audience for this essay. How will this audience influence your choice of tone and language for the essay?

Open Notebook

Section 5: Arguments

  • Now that you have viewed the presentations, you may want to decide to limit the subject choices for students. You may want to assign arguing for a specific teenager and against another.
  • The other option is to let students choose about whom they want to write.

Homework

Continue working on your assignments.

  • If your team has presented, write a brief report to the teacher explaining your part in the work of that presentation.
  • Organize your notes for which teenager should be granted asylum and which one should not.

Open Notebook