Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
High School
Grade:
12
Provider:
Pearson
Tags:
Asylum, Grade 12 ELA, Groups, Presentations
License:
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0
Language:
English

Immigration Policy Fact Sheet

Immigration Policy Fact Sheet

Lesson Overview

What is the U.S. policy on immigration, especially for refugees? In this lesson, students will share responses on current issues in immigration. Then, as a class, they’ll jigsaw a fact sheet about immigration policy. They’ll get instructions about the Granting Refuge Activity.

Lesson Preparation

  • Read the lesson and student content.
  • Anticipate student difficulties and identify the differentiation options you will choose for working with your students.
  • Be prepared to organize students for the jigsaw activity.
  • Confirm you can access the Immigration Policy Center homepage ( http://www.immigrationpolicy.org/ ).

Section 1: Immigration and Immigration Reform

  • Allow students time to share. English language learners and students who are reluctant to share in a large group will have an opportunity to rehearse.
    • ELL: It is very positive to allow ELLs to rehearse before asking them to share in a large group.
  • Make sure all students have submitted their fear narratives.

Opening

During Lesson 17’s Closing, you completed a Quick Write about current immigration issues.

  • Share your response with your classmates.

Section 2: U.S. Immigration System Jigsaw

  • This style of lesson is called a “jigsaw” because members of the expert groups are like pieces of a jigsaw puzzle, fitting together to learn about a topic; they then reconfigure into another puzzle, each piece responsible for a different function.
  • It’s highly effective because students take responsibility for mastering information so well that they can teach others; the weight of responsibility pushes them hard to learn, in most cases without any teacher intervention.
  • The jigsaw activity consists of two rounds. In Round 1 students meet in “expert” groups, based on the section of the text they have read, and share their findings. In Round 2, students reassemble in “home” groups, which contain at least one expert per section, and teach the other students what they have learned.
  • Ideally, your class would have 25 students for this activity. As that is unlikely, you may need to modify the groups to adapt to your class size.
    • ✓ If you have 25 students, form them into home groups of five and have them count off from 1 to 5. The number determines which section of the text they read and which expert group they join.
    • ✓ If you have more than 25 students, you could have some students double up as experts in certain home groups as needed.
    • ✓ If you have fewer than 25 students, you could have four groups, with one group responsible for sections 4 and 5 (and the introduction) of the text. If this is the case, students should count off in their groups from 1 to 4. You may need to have some students double up as experts in certain home groups.
    • ELL: In forming groups, be aware of your ELLs and ensure that they will have a learning environment where they can be productive. Pair them up sometimes with native speakers so they can learn from native counterparts’ language skills. At other times, pair them up with students who are at the same level of language skills so they can take a more active role and they can work things out together. At yet other times, pair them up with students whose proficiency level is lower so they can play the role of supporter.
  • Remind students to remember their home groups.
  • Each numbered expert group is responsible for reading, taking notes, and discussing the information in one section of the “Fact Sheet.”
    • ✓ Group 1: “I. Family-Based Immigration”
    • ✓ Group 2: “II. Employment Based Immigration”
    • ✓ Group 3: “III. Refugees and Asylees”
    • ✓ Group 4: “IV. Other Forms of Humanitarian Relief”
    • ✓ Group 5: “V. U.S. Citizenship” and the first paragraph of the text
  • To access the “Fact Sheet,” go to the Immigration Policy Center homepage ( http://www.immigrationpolicy.org/ ) and search for “How the United States Immigration System Works: A Fact Sheet.” It was published in November 2010.
  • Tell students they should read their assigned section silently, taking notes as they go, before meeting with their expert group.

Work Time

For this jigsaw activity, you will read one section of a text on the U.S. immigration system, teach others about it, and hear about what others have learned.

With the help of your teacher, form “home” groups. In your home group, count off from 1 to 5. Your number will determine your “expert” group.

  • Group 1: “I. Family-Based Immigration”
  • Group 2: “II. Employment Based Immigration”
  • Group 3: “III. Refugees and Asylees”
  • Group 4: “IV. Other Forms of Humanitarian Relief”
  • Group 5: “V. U.S. Citizenship” and the first paragraph of the text

To find the text, go to the Immigration Policy Center’s homepage, http://www.immigrationpolicy.org/. Then search for “How the United States Immigration System Works: A Fact Sheet.”

  • Silently and individually read and take notes on your assigned section.

​Open Notebook

Section 3: U.S. Immigration System Jigsaw: Round 1

  • Make sure students get into their correct expert groups: all the Group 1 students should meet, all the Group 2 students should meet, and so forth.
  • Make sure each expert group has time to discuss its section of the text.
    • SWD: Encourage SWDs to ask their partners to help clarify any concepts they find confusing.
  • You may need to remind students to take careful notes to aid them in their teaching in the home group.
  • Some expert groups may finish before the others are ready to move on (Group 5, for example). You may want to suggest that after students have finished their tasks, they could read over the entire document until all students are ready to return to their home groups.
  • Circulate to answer questions and to help where needed.

Work Time

Assemble in your expert group of classmates who read the same section as you.

  • Discuss what you read, share your notes, and ask questions in your expert group.

Open Notebook

Your goal is to become an expert on your section of “How the United States Immigration System Works: A Fact Sheet” so you’ll have the information and confidence to share with your home group.

Section 4: U.S. Immigration System Jigsaw: Round 2

  • Help students reorganize back into their home groups. Each group should have at least one expert for each section covered.
  • Use your discretion to determine how to handle those sections that have more experts than groups. You could have both experts present separately or have them present together to their home group.
  • Give students time to share their information with their home group.
  • Circulate to answer questions and to help where needed.

Work Time

Return to your home group and take turns reporting what your section of “How the United States Immigration System Works: A Fact Sheet” was about.

  • Group 1: “I. Family-Based Immigration”
  • Group 2: “II. Employment Based Immigration”
  • Group 3: “III. Refugees and Asylees”
  • Group 4: “IV. Other Forms of Humanitarian Relief”
  • Group 5: “V. U.S. Citizenship” and the first paragraph of the text
  • You’re responsible for teaching each other all the material you learned in your expert group. Feel free to use your notes! And take notes while others are presenting—if you need more information from another group member, be sure to ask!

Open Notebook

Section 5: Granting Refuge Activity

  • Look at the Granting Refuge Activity with your students and make yourself available to answer questions about the activity.
  • Tell them you will assign the roles students will take in Lesson 19.
  • Further explanations and notes about the assignment can be found in the Granting Refuge Activity Teacher Notes.

Closing

Your next activity will also deal with immigration policy.

  • Go over the instructions for the Granting Refuge Activity.
  • Ask any questions you have.

The culmination of this activity will be for you to argue in favor of granting asylum to one refugee and against granting it to another.

Section 6: Independent Reading

  • Remind students that their Independent Reading books need to be completed by Lesson 22.

Homework

Continue your Independent Reading.

  • Read your Independent Reading book. Plan to finish the book by Lesson 22.