Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
High School
Grade:
12
Provider:
Pearson
Tags:
Culture, Difference, Globalization, Grade 12 ELA
License:
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0
Language:
English

Citing Quotations From A Play

Citing Quotations From A Play

Overview

What are the conventions for citing quotations from a play? You will guide students through the rules, and they’ll have one more chance to proofread their essays. Students will reflect on the Guiding Questions. Then they will select their Independent Reading books.

Preparation

  • Read the lesson and student content.
  • Anticipate student difficulties and identify the differentiation options you will choose for working with your students.

Shakespearean Notation

  • Let students know that they are expected to include quotations from The Tempest in their essays.
  • Remind them to be absolutely precise in using the quotations, maintaining capital letters where they would not normally appear in prose and using Shakespearean spelling.
  • Each citation must be followed by the act, scene, and line number in the play. For example:
    • ✓ “How many goodly creatures are there here! / How beauteous mankind is! O brave new world, / That has such people in’t!” (5.1.209–211)
  • Note that there are multiple ways to format citations, but the essential information remains the same: act, scene, and line number. Use the formatting style of your choosing.
  • Review the conventions for quotation marks.
    • ELL: Be sure your pace is adequate, and pause as necessary to ensure that ELLs are following the review. Allow them to ask questions to clarify meaning, if needed.
  • Ask students if they have any questions.

Opening

Listen as your teacher reviews conventions for citing quotations and Shakespearean notation.

  • Take notes so that you can check the quotations and citations in your essay.

Open Notebook

Your Quotations

  • Give students time to proofread and to make corrections, in groups of three or four.
    • SWD: Be sure that each of group has at least one student who can support SWDs in the task of proofreading.
  • When students have had a chance to review each paper, ask them to submit their essays.

Work Time

In a small group, go over your essay again.

  • One at a time, review each of the quotations you cited in your essay.
  • Check also for errors in punctuation, grammar, spelling, and capitalization.

Submit your essay to your teacher.

Guiding Questions

  • Give students at least 10 minutes to reflect on the Guiding Questions for the unit.
    • ELL: It is important that ELLs be supported, since this activity has a heavy language load. Support this group by allowing them to discuss with a partner if they so choose and by giving them additional time.
  • As students are reading their reflections, circulate to listen for ideas that are original or provocative for the Whole Group Discussion.

Work Time

Write a brief reflection about how reading The Tempest has engaged you in thinking about answers to the Guiding Questions for this unit.

  • What role do national identity, custom, religion, and other locally held beliefs play in a world increasingly characterized by globalization?
  • How does Shakespeare’s view of human rights compare with that in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights?
  • Who is civilized? Who decides what civilization is or how it’s defined?
  • How do we behave toward and acknowledge those whose culture is different from our own?

Open Notebook

Exchange reflections with a partner and read. Decide what you would like to share in the Whole Group Discussion.

Think about how much our civilized society has changed since Shakespeare’s time.

Guiding Questions

  • Facilitate a discussion about The Tempest and what that play says about the Guiding Questions.

Closing

Share with your classmates what you, your partner, or both of you wrote about the Guiding Questions.

  • What role do national identity, custom, religion, and other locally held beliefs play in a world increasingly characterized by globalization?
  • How does Shakespeare’s view of human rights compare with that in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights?
  • Who is civilized? Who decides what civilization is or how it’s defined?
  • How do we behave toward and acknowledge those whose culture is different from our own?

Independent Reading

  • Reinforce for students the importance of budgeting their time and not leaving their reading to the last minute.

Homework

Back in Lesson 1, you looked over the list of Independent Reading texts. By now, you have chosen one of them for Independent Reading.

Each book on the list will help to address this Guiding Question for the unit: “How do we behave toward and acknowledge those whose culture is different from our own?”

  • Begin reading your chosen book.

During class time over the next few days, you will be exploring contemporary global issues having to do with civilized behavior.