Author:
Aubree Evans
Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Module
Level:
High School, Community College / Lower Division, College / Upper Division, Graduate / Professional, Adult Education
Tags:
License:
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike
Language:
English

BranchED OER Template

BranchED OER Template

Overview

This template has been created by Branch Alliance for Educator Diversity to facilitate the development of OER as instructional materials for teacher education classes.

Within this resource are instructions, templates, and examples for using this template to create your own unit(s) for your own classes. 

About this template [DELETE THIS SECTION WHEN REMIXING]

This template is intended to be used to create OER to fully support or supplement a university course, particularly in a teacher education program. 

This OER has been formatted to provide you with blank templates and examples of the course intro, course-level outcomes, content, activities, and assessment options. 

Section 9 offers reflection questions to improve this template. Please answer the reflection questions in the COMMENTS section of this template so that the next user can improve upon the template.

This template is intended to be used as a guide to plug in your own course content. Simply hit the REMIX button and edit the OER to insert your own content. Additional units/weeks/lessons can be added by additional sections.

Note: When you remix this template to make your own OER, delete section 1.

Unit 1 Introduction to the Course [TEMPLATE & EXAMPLE]

<<INTRODUCTION TEMPLATE>>

 

This section is a blank template with prompts for instructors to type in their own course introductions.  

 

Introduction to the unit:

Audience:

Length of course:

Unit-level outcomes:

Technology requirements:

 

 

****************

<<INTRODUCTION EXAMPLE>>

This section contains a sample introduction to the course. This is a sample of how this template can be used. 

 

Sample Introduction to the Course: Creating Instructional Infographics

Introduction to the course/unit: 

This goal of this course is to introduce learners to the benefit of using instructional infographics to support higher education instructional materials. The course is intended to supplement an existing course or professional development workshop. 

Audience: 

The intended audience of this course is adults, instructors and educators who work with adults, particularly in higher education.

Length of course:

This resource has been designed to supplement a 2-week course.

Unit-level outcomes: 

While engaging with this unit, learners will:

  1. Identify infographics that effectively communicates educational concepts.

  2. Create an infographic that effectively communicates an educational concept.

Technology requirements:

This section should identify all of the technology that is required to successfully complete the lesson. You should consider various educational contexts when designing your lesson plan. Be clear and descriptive as to what the classroom should be equipped with. Some example questions to answer include:

  • What are the specific technologies that your lesson requires? 

  • Does the instructor need to use a computer during the lesson? Do learners need access to a computer during the lesson? 

  • Should the learning space be equipped with a projector, speakers, or a microphone? 

  • What level of internet access does the classroom need (e.g. high bandwidth, constant/streaming connection, etc.)? 

  • Do students need to use technology outside of the classroom, such as completing online homework or research assignments? 

  • Does your lesson plan have alternate activities for low-resource contexts? 

  •  Example: No technology is required for this lesson. Optional: A projector can be used to display the debate topics for students to refer to during practice.  

(From EFL Lesson Plan Template: https://www.oercommons.org/authoring/52181-efl-lesson-plan-template/view)

 

 

 

 

Unit 1 Content [TEMPLATE & EXAMPLE]

<<CONTENT TEMPLATE>>

This section is a blank template with prompts for instructors to type in and upload their own content options.  

 

Content: Description of content and explanation of how to use. To increase inclusivity and accessibility, use more than one content type. Listed below are possible content types:

  • Articles, blog posts, written/textual content 

  • Lecture notes

  • PowerPoint or Google slides

  • Infographics (be sure they have a CC license)

  • Images (be sure they have a CC license)

  • Podcast

  • Video

    • Media

    • Movie

    • Recorded lecture

 

 

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<<CONTENT EXAMPLE>>

This section contains sample content options to show you how this section might be used.  

 

The definition of infographics we're using here:

Information + anything graphical = infographics

 

There are formal definitions of infographics. But for our instructional purposes, we are interested in any graphical display of information.

 

Why infographics

Dual Coding Theory (DCT) by Allan Paivio, a professor of psychology. DCT is the idea that we have cognitive subsystems for both verbal and nonverbal processes. One is for language and the other is for imagery. 

In the image below, we see a picture of a dog we think dog, and when we read the word dog, we think dog. If we know that we process both words and images, one way we can have a more inclusive classroom is by offering students both words and images when we teach content.

We can't say one is more effective than another because there is conflicting data about that. 

Images are not accessible to visually impaired learners, so they are better as a supplement. If using images in a synchronous class, be sure to describe the images. If using them in an asynchronous context, be sure to use concise alt text to describe the image. 

An image can directly activate an image in the brain. For example, we see a dog and process dog. 

Dual Coding Theory states that we have two cognitive subsystems for processing meaning: one visual and one textual.

Or an image can represent verbal meanings. Like we see a picture that symbolizes something else. Heart makes us think of the concept or emotion love.

   

heart

  

Infographic Clarity Rules

There are rules we must follow to create instructional infographics that enable the learner to quickly understand the concept being taught. 

 

Rule 1: Use simple, universally recognized icons. Examples=plus/minus, arrows, check marks, etc.

 

 

  

Rule 2: Stay away from movie, book, or media references. They can be too complicated to represent, and your audience may not be familiar with the reference.

 

sherlock homes infographic

Rule 3: Use no more than 3-4 colors, and make sure they contrast. The colors should be used to call the eye to the main part of the image. There is one main color (like red in the image below, and the other colors contrast the red so that it jumps off the screen/page. Use colors in a way that guides the eye where you want to guide it.

 

Rule 4: Do not cross lines over borders. Things should fit neatly inside of frames and borders. Also, spacings should be equal. You want to make the image as easy to understand for the eye as possible. Equal spacings and neat borders can help guide the eye where you want it.

 

Unit 1 Activities [TEMPLATE & EXAMPLE]

<<ACTIVITIES TEMPLATE>>

This section is a blank template with prompts for instructors to type in and upload their own activity options.  

 

Activities: Please include an option of at least 2 activities for students to choose from. Each activity should include learner instructions, facilitator notes, and which outcomes they address. Listed below are possible activity types:

  • Discussion

    • Synchronous discussion platforms:

      • Face-to-face

      • Zoom

      • Google Meets

      • Teams

    • Asynchronous discussion platforms:

      • Discussion boards (LMS or Google)

      • FlipGrid

      • Marco Polo

      • Social Media (Twitter, Instagram Facebook, Slack, Discord, etc)

  • Written assignment

    • Paper

    • Blog

    • Web site

    • Journal (paper or digital)

    • Presentation

      • Learners can create a PowerPoint or Google slides

      • Learners can create a video of themselves presenting

  • Other

    • Meme

    • Selfie/photo 

    • Communiating about content on a social media platform (IG, Twitter, etc)

    • Video

****************

<<ACTIVITIES EXAMPLE>>

This section contains sample activity options to illustrate how this section can be designed.

Activity options to address Outcome 1:

  1. Learner instructions: Look at the following images. In writing, identify the ones that effectively communicate an educational concept. Provide a written response about why each one does or does not. (Answer key below images). 

    • Facilitator notes: The images can be shared in OER, in a synchronous class, or in an LMS. Be sure to label the images with a number, name, or letter so that student can clearly identify them. Prompt students to refer to the Infographic Clarity Rules (above in content) when explaining which are effect and why.

  2. Look at the following images. In a synchronous class discussion, talk about which ones you find effective and why. If your classmates disagree, try to convince them why your answer is correct. Be prepared to share your answers with the whole class group, naming the infographics that effectively communicate an educational concept. Provide a written response about why each one does or does not. (Answer key included in instructional notes).

    • Facilitation guidance: The images can be shared in OER, in a synchronous class, or in an LMS. Be sure to label the images with a number, name, or letter so that student can clearly identify them. Prompt students to refer to the Infographic Clarity Rules (above in content) when explaining which are effect and why.

 Image A:

Sociocultural Theory Infographic

 

Image B:

3 Main Learning Strategies Infographic

Suggested Answer Key

Image A clearly communicates an educational concept because the theory and definition are stated simply on the infographic. There is a single image that represents the meaning of the definition. The image color contrasts with the background so that the image and definition are easy to see.

Image B gives easy-to-understand images that illustrate each educational concept. This image may be considered less effective because the eye is guided from right to left, and then right again. Also, the image types are different, which can be visually distracting.

 

Unit 1 Assessment [TEMPLATE & EXAMPLE]

<<ASSESSMENT TEMPLATE>>

This section is a blank template with prompts for instructors to type in and upload their own assessment options.  

 

Assessment: Please include an option of at least 2 assessment types for students to choose from. Please describe the assessment, how to administer, and how they meet the unit-level outcomes. Any of the assignment types listed above can be used to assess outcomes. Additional assessment types are listed below:

  • Project-based assessment

  • Authentic assessment

  • Standards-based assessment

  • Multiple-choice assessment.

    • M/C questions can be listed in the OER, or

    • a Google Form assessment can be shared through OER (be sure to make the Google Form public or at least viewable to anyone with the link)

 

****************

<<ASSESSMENT EXAMPLE>>

This section contains sample assessment options. This is a sample of how this template can be used. 

Assessment options to address Outcome 2:

  1. Using an infographic creation tool of your choice, create an infographic that illustrates your favorite educational theory. Be prepared to explain how this image effectively communicates the theory. 

  2. Using paper and pen/pencil, draw an image that illustrates your favorite educational theory. Be prepared to explain how this image effectively communicates the theory. 

Unit 2 Content [TEMPLATE]

This section is a blank template with prompts for instructors to type in and upload their own content options.  

Content: Description of content and explanation of how to use. Listed below are possible content types:

  • Articles, blog posts, written/textual content 

  • Lecture notes

  • PowerPoint or Google slides

  • Infographics (be sure they have a CC license)

  • Images (be sure they have a CC license)

  • Podcast

  • Video

    • Media

    • Movie

    • Recorded lecture

Unit 2 Activities [TEMPLATE]

This section is a blank template with prompts for instructors to type in and upload their own activity options.  

Activities: Please include an option of at least 2 activities for students to choose from. Please describe the activities, how to facilitate them, and how they meet the unit-level outcomes. Listed below are possible activity types:

  • Discussion

    • Synchronous discussion platforms:

      • Face-to-face

      • Zoom

      • Google Meets

      • Teams

    • Asynchronous discussion platforms:

      • Discussion boards (LMS or Google)

      • FlipGrid

      • Marco Polo

      • Social Media (Twitter, Instagram Facebook, Slack, Discord, etc)

  • Written assignment

    • Paper

    • Blog

    • Web site

    • Journal (paper or digital)

    • Presentation

      • Learners can create a PowerPoint or Google slides

      • Learners can create a video of themselves presenting

  • Other

    • Meme

    • Selfie/photo 

    • Communiating about content on a social media platform (IG, Twitter, etc)

    • Video

Unit 2 Assessment [TEMPLATE]

This section is a blank template with prompts for instructors to type in and upload their own assessment options.  

 

Assessment: Please include an option of at least 2 assessment types for students to choose from. Please describe the assessment, how to administer, and how they meet the unit-level outcomes. Any of the assignment types listed above can be used to assess outcomes. Additional assessment types are listed below:

  • Project-based assessment

  • Authentic assessment

  • Standards-based assessment

  • Multiple-choice assessment.

    • M/C questions can be listed in the OER, or

    • a Google Form assessment can be shared through OER (be sure to make the Google Form public or at least viewable to anyone with the link)

Unit 3 Content [TEMPLATE]

This section is a blank template with prompts for instructors to type in and upload their own content options.  

Content: Description of content and explanation of how to use. Listed below are possible content types:

  • Articles, blog posts, written/textual content 

  • Lecture notes

  • PowerPoint or Google slides

  • Infographics (be sure they have a CC license)

  • Images (be sure they have a CC license)

  • Podcast

  • Video

    • Media

    • Movie

    • Recorded lecture

Unit 3 Activities [TEMPLATE]

This section is a blank template with prompts for instructors to type in and upload their own activity options.  

Activities: Please include an option of at least 2 activities for students to choose from. Please describe the activities, how to facilitate them, and how they meet the unit-level outcomes. Listed below are possible activity types:

  • Discussion

    • Synchronous discussion platforms:

      • Face-to-face

      • Zoom

      • Google Meets

      • Teams

    • Asynchronous discussion platforms:

      • Discussion boards (LMS or Google)

      • FlipGrid

      • Marco Polo

      • Social Media (Twitter, Instagram Facebook, Slack, Discord, etc)

  • Written assignment

    • Paper

    • Blog

    • Web site

    • Journal (paper or digital)

    • Presentation

      • Learners can create a PowerPoint or Google slides

      • Learners can create a video of themselves presenting

  • Other

    • Meme

    • Selfie/photo 

    • Communiating about content on a social media platform (IG, Twitter, etc)

    • Video

Unit 3 Assessment [TEMPLATE]

This section is a blank template with prompts for instructors to type in and upload their own assessment options.  

 

Assessment: Please include an option of at least 2 assessment types for students to choose from. Please describe the assessment, how to administer, and how they meet the unit-level outcomes. Any of the assignment types listed above can be used to assess outcomes. Additional assessment types are listed below:

  • Project-based assessment

  • Authentic assessment

  • Standards-based assessment

  • Multiple-choice assessment.

    • M/C questions can be listed in the OER, or

    • a Google Form assessment can be shared through OER (be sure to make the Google Form public or at least viewable to anyone with the link)

Help us improve this template! [PLEASE ANSWER THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS IN THE COMMENTS OF THIS OER]

Please answer the following questions and POST THEM IN THE COMMENTS SECTION OF THE ORIGINAL TEMPLATE OER. 

Reflection questions for template continous improvement:

1. What worked well for you when using this template?

 

2. What did not work well when using this template?

 

3. What changes would you make to this template the next time you use it?

 

4. Would you recommend this template to other educators? Why? Why not?