Subject:
English Language Arts, Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
High School
Grade:
12
Provider:
Pearson
Tags:
Character Analysis, Grade 12 ELA, Writing
License:
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0
Language:
English

Character Analysis Conclusion (Peer Review)

Character Analysis Conclusion (Peer Review)

Lesson Overview

In this lesson, students continue to revise their Character Analysis Essay. They will look at an example of an effective conclusion and write an alternative conclusion for their essay. With a partner, they’ll discuss their two conclusions and pick the most effective.

Lesson Preparation

  • Read the lesson and student content.
  • Anticipate student difficulties and identify the differentiation options you will choose for working with your students.
  • Facilitate writing conferences with students. After working with students who have requested conferences, conduct conferences with the rest.

Section 1: Character Analysis Essay Introduction

  • Give student partners a couple of minutes to share before a brief Whole Group Share.
  • Ask students if they wrote or saw a good introduction to the Character Analysis Essay.
  • Ask if anyone used the model of moving from most general to the specific thesis.
  • Listen to one or two examples of introductions.

Opening

How did you revise your introduction?

  • Share the introduction of your essay with a new partner.
  • Volunteer to share your introduction for your essay with the whole class or listen as your classmates share.

Section 2: An Effective Conclusion

  • Lead students through an explanation of the language in the Closure section of the Grade 12 Informational Writing Rubric.
  • The parenthetical section suggests that the closure might express the significance of the topic or implications for the reader.
  • Review the sample conclusion with students. It is from a writer who is analyzing ‘Melia from “The Ruined Maid” by Thomas Hardy.
  • Point out to students how the final sentences articulate the significance of the analysis of the literary work.

Work Time

The standard for Closure in the Grade 12 Informational Writing Rubric reads, “Provides a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).”

Note that the standard does not say, “Summarizes what you have written already in your essay.” While to conclude is to end, in an essay it is more than that. It is to come to a conclusion about something or settle something. A conclusion must follow from and support the information and explanation in the body of the essay.

  • Look at the example of an effective conclusion.

Section 3: Character Analysis Essay Conclusion

  • Give students about 10 minutes to write or revise their conclusions (or any part of the essay).
    • SWD: Students with expressive language difficulties may benefit from audio-recording their ideas to play back as they compose their drafts. This can be done independently, with peer partners, or with the support of a teacher.
    • ELL: Be sure that students are writing good endings to their essays successfully. If you find that some students need additional support, consider working with them as a group.
  • Note that students may decide they like their original conclusion best and still use it, but they should try out something different.
  • Continue to conduct writing or reading conferences with students who request them.

Work Time

Reread the conclusion of your essay.

  • Does it come to a conclusion about something or settle an issue?
  • Does it follow from and support the information and explanation in the body of the essay?
  • Does it articulate the significance of your analysis or implications for readers of the literary work and your essay?

Write an alternate conclusion to your essay.

Section 4: Two Conclusions

  • Give students about 15 minutes to share their essays with a partner.
  • Continue to conduct writing or reading conferences with students who request them.

Work Time

With a partner, review each other’s essays, focusing on the conclusions.

  • Share your alternate conclusion.
  • Read through the entire essay to make sure that the conclusion “follows from and supports the information or explanation presented.”
  • Discuss which of the two conclusions works better for your essay.

Section 5: More Revision

  • Continue to conduct writing or reading conferences with students who request them.

Work Time

Use the remaining time to confer with your partner about any of the comments made about your paper and consider applying them.

  • Revise and polish your essay as necessary.
  • Decide which conclusion is most effective.
  • Make final changes to your conclusion.

Section 6: Conclusion Discussion

  • Facilitate a Whole Group Discussion about how revising their conclusions went.
    • SWD: If students need additional support, consider giving them a revising and editing checklist while making revisions on their paper.

Closing

Discuss these questions with your classmates.

  • What was the easiest part of writing a conclusion?
  • What was the most difficult part of writing a conclusion?

Section 7: Character Analysis Essay

  • Let students know you want a clean, best effort for the next lesson’s proofreading session.
  • Remind students that their Character Analysis Essays are due Lesson 28.

Homework

Continue working on your Character Analysis Essay.

  • If necessary, finalize your conclusion and make any other revisions to your essay.

During Lesson 27, you will have one more chance to get advice from a peer.