Author:
Raeanna Carlson
Subject:
Literature, Philosophy, Composition and Rhetoric, Reading Literature
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment, Lesson, Lesson Plan, Reading
Level:
High School
Grade:
9
Tags:
ACT Practice, Argument, Assignment, Project, The Most Dangerous Game, Writing
License:
Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
Language:
English

Education Standards

"The Most Dangerous Game" Argumentative Essay

"The Most Dangerous Game" Argumentative Essay

Overview

This unit was designed to give freshmen a small writing task that is similar to the ACT writing. "The Most Dangerous Game" generates great conversation of the ideas of morals and ethics, and this writing task allows students the opportunity to explore their own morals and ethics.

OBJECTIVES: The learner will...

  1. identify the main points of an argument and connect arguments to supportive material
  2. argue a chosen side using supportive details
  3. construct personal beliefs about morals and ethics
  4. write and edit a short argumentative essay 
  5. collaborate with peers

Introduction

TEACHER NOTES:

This unit was designed to give freshmen a small writing task that is similar to the ACT writing. "The Most Dangerous Game" generates great conversation of the ideas of morals and ethics, and this writing task allows students the opportunity to explore their own morals and ethics. 

Once they have a grasp on morals and ethics in this first , have them read "The Most Dangerous Game." 

LET'S ARGUE!!!!

We are going to take a dive into the concepts of morals and ethics. You will watch two videos. One pertaining to morals and one pertaining to ethics. 

  1. MORALS

  2. ETHICS

 

In a short response, explain the differences and similarities between morals and ethics. Submit your response to the LMS assignment titled "Morals vs Ethics."

Right and Wrong
Photo Credit: https://freesvg.org/low-poly-confusion-2

 

"The Most Dangerous Game"

Click here for digital version of "The Most Dangerous Game."

 

QUESTIONS TO ANSWER:

  1. Who determines what is considered right and what is considered wrong in this story? 
  2. How does Zaroff justify what he is doing on the island? 
  3. Why does Rainsford seek revenge in the end? Is that considered doing what is right? 
  4. What are the effects of Zaroff's and Rainsford's actions? 
  5. When is it okay to kill someone? 

***Submit your answers to the LMS assignment titled "TMDG Questions."

Writing Task

TEACHER NOTES:

You can change up the outline as much as you need to suite your studnets. Suggestion: delete one of the "Main Point" sections to avoid confusion since the writing assignment is really only calling for two paragraphs. You can use another form of writing guide. Some students may want a writing guide to help them visualize what they need in regards to sentences. You will find that resource below. 

 

 

 

RESOURCES

Outline

Writing Guide

Transition Words Website

Pick a perspective (listed below) and argue for that side. Refute and concede various points that the other side makes. Follow the steps below to help. 

  1. Start a Google Doc and share it with the teacher. (Put everything into this one document, just add new pages.)

  2. Make a pro/con list about hunting humans

  3. Pick a perspective that you agree with and write a paragraph as to why you agree with it. 

  4. Write a paragraph about why you don't agree with the other perspective. 

    • If there is anything that you "kind of" agree with then say that and state why. 

  5. Write an introduction and a conclusion

 USE THE OUTLINE TO GUIDE YOUR WRITING.

USE THE WRITING GUIDE IF NEEDED

TRANSITION WORDS RESOURCE

PERSPECTIVE ONE:

What Zaroff was doing is good for the environment because the world is overpopulated, and resources are being depleted at alarming rates. It is better to have fewer people than starving, homeless people. 

 

PERSPECTIVE TWO:

No matter how a person looks at this, what Zaroff was doing is murder. By law, murder is illegal, and no person is above the law. These people were stolen from their lives and forced to play Zaroff's sick and twisted game. This is immoral and inhumane.

Peer Editing

TEACHER NOTES:

Assign the peer editors. Ensure to go over expectations for partner work. Feel free to edit and modify the checklist to suit the needs of your students. 

 

RESOURCES:

Peer Editing Checklist

Edit
 Nick Youngson CC BY-SA 3.0 Alpha Stock Images

You will edit your rough draft with a peer. Click on the link below to get a copy of the peer editing checklist. Share your document with your partner, read through it, offer edits, and complete the checklist. Use the comment feature on Google Docs to complete the assignment. To show that you made comments on your partner's document, take a screen shot and add it to the bottom of your checklist be fore you submit it. Then, submit your checklist and edits to the LMS assignment titled "Peer Editing."

 

PEER EDITING

Grading

TEACHER NOTES:

Feel free to edit the rubric once you have made your copy. 

Once you have finished editing your final draft, create a fresh document, label and format it in proper MLA 8 format. From there, you will submit the document into the LMS assignment titled "Final TMDG Argumentative Essay."

 

Click this link to get a copy of the rubric