Author:
Beth Clothier, John Sadzewicz, Dana John, Angela Anderson
Subject:
Communication, Educational Technology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab, Lesson Plan
Level:
Middle School, High School
Tags:
Building Student STEM Literacy, Civic Engagement, Commenter, Digital Citizenship, Online Responsibilities, Online Risks, Online Roles, Producer, Swiper, Viewer, Who Am I Online Unit, active, barriers to communication, barriers-to-communication, blogger, building-student-stem-literacy, civic, civic-engagement, communication, communication skills, communication-skills, consume, continuum, digital-citizenship, graphic organizer, graphic-organizer, identity, originator, passive, valid, vlogger, wa-edtech
License:
Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike
Language:
English
Media Formats:
Downloadable docs, Text/HTML

Education Standards

What Is Your Role Online?

What Is Your Role Online?

Overview

In this lesson, students will define their dominant roles online, explain the benefits of each type of online role and discuss the responsibilities and risks inherent in each type of online interaction. This lesson is part of a media unit curated at our Digital Citizenship website entitled "Who Am I Online?"

Defining Your Risks, Responsibilities, and Role in Online Interactions

 

Lesson Objective/Student Target:

The students will be able to...

  • Define his/her dominant role online.
  • Explain the benefits of each type of online role.
  • Discuss the responsibilities and risks inherent in each type of online interaction.

ISTE’s Standards for Students (2016)

“Students recognize the rights, responsibilities and opportunities of living, learning and working in an interconnected digital world, and they act and model in ways that are safe, legal and ethical.”

  • Digital Citizen 2a: “Students cultivate and manage their digital identity and reputation and are aware of the permanence of their actions in the digital world” (ISTE, 2016).
  • Digital Citizen 2d: “Students manage their personal data to maintain digital privacy and security and are aware of data-collection technology used to track their navigation online” (ISTE, 2016).

Washington State Health Standards (OSPI, 2016)

Standard 2: "Students will analyze the influence of family, peers, culture, media, technology, and other factors on health behaviors."

  • H2.Se 8.8 "Analyze the impact of technology and social media on friendships and relationships."
  • H2.So 5.HS "Compare and contrast the influence of family, peers, culture, media, technology, and other factors on harassment, intimidation, and bullying."
  • H1.Sa 3.HS "Analyze potential dangers of sharing personal information through electronic media."

Overarching Questions:

What is my role when I am online?

When am I a producer, commenter, viewer, and/or swiper?

Key Vocabulary: 

ProducerCreates, develops, remixes content to be shared online.
CommenterEngages in online dialogs, posts comments, reviews and feedback.
ViewerWatches videos, reads posts, looks at images.
SwiperOpens shared links, scrolls through media, skims content

Materials: 

Content Objective: 

The students will be able to define his/her dominant role online, explain the benefits of each type of online role and discuss the responsibilities and risks inherent in each type of online interaction.

    Language Objective: 

    Students will access the learning through:

    Reading: short written descriptions.

    Speaking: students will discuss in small groups and then share out the important points with the larger group for a shared understanding.

    Listening: students will ask questions related to the slides presented, and rephrase the roles assigned to their group.

    Pre-Assessment/Background Knowledge: 

    Before students arrive, create two continua on an accessible classroom wall. Students will need post-its or a way to mark their position along each of the continua.

    To open the discussion, have students place themselves on the continuum of “active” to “passive” participant in online content. Ask where they see themselves along this spectrum - from very passive to very active. There is no judgment in any placement, just gathering a sense of the group’s current participation.

    On a separate continuum (low risk to high risk), have students place a post-it (or mark) to indicate the personal risk they believe they take in their online interactions.

    Open the class with a short discussion of where the bulk of student behaviors land on each continuum, taking note of the outliers. Give students an opportunity to discuss their reasoning. This should remain non-judgmental; there is no inherent “right” or “wrong” to any placement. The goal should be just to have awareness of one’s role.

    Activity: 

    Share the slide show “What Is Your Role Online” with the class. Go through slides 1-5 together, ensuring that students have a basic understanding of the four types of roles.

    Next, divide the class into four groups of 3-5 students each. (With a large class, you may want to have two groups for each role).

    Provide each group with the slides appropriate to their role:

    • The Producer group gets slides 6-10.
    • The Commenter group gets slides 11 - 15.
    • The Viewer group gets slides 16 - 20.
    • The Swiper group gets slides 21 - 25.

    Each group will go through the slides, answering the questions together to come to a shared understanding of their assigned role.

    Students may want to use a graphic organizer to formulate their own thoughts first, and then share with their group.

    Students should be encouraged to offer their own experiences and interpretations, as well as dissenting opinions on the roles.

    The goal is for students to consider and discuss rights, responsibilities, risks, and benefits of various interactions online.

    Jigsaw Presentations:

    You may have each group create a poster of their answers to share with the larger class.

    When groups have completed their posters, have them reassemble as a large group and each group share their poster to present their role to the other groups.

    OR

    Expert Groups:

    Have each student take notes on the discussion of their group’s role. When groups finish their discussions, have them reconfigure into new small groups consisting of one “expert” from each role to share with the next small group. (The second grouping should include at least one person from each of the four roles).

    Each individual shares the discussion from their “role” with the others in the new group, until everyone has shared and all groups have discussed all four roles.

    Reconvene as a large group and continue the slide show at slide 26 to discuss the major differences between each of the types of roles.

    The larger group discussion might lend itself to a four-corners exercise (strongly agree, agree, disagree, strongly disagree) or supporters/dissenters where they can discuss and debate their positions about the benefits, risks, and responsibilities of each of the roles.

    Scaffolds

    To help support students, consider pre-assigning groups to provide a balance of abilities, personalities, and work-ethics.

    Consider providing printed handouts of each group’s role, adding sentence stems or additional hints for students who need extra language or other supports.

    To extend the work for students who need additional challenge, ask students to define the roles in their own way, based on their understanding of behaviors they see online. Have them assess the risk and participation levels themselves without the provided continua and then have them compare and defend their responses with evidence.

    Check for Understanding: 

    As students leave, ask them to return to the continua of risk and participation and move their post-it if needed. Do you notice any change in their levels of acceptable risk after this discussion? Do they rate their participation any differently as a result?

    Follow Up Activities: 

    Based on the results of this activity, you may be able to identify a path through the remaining lessons in this unit. Students who are already well-versed in roles and responsibilities, may be ready to discuss and explore topics related to “Social Media” or “Mindfulness;” students who are primarily swipers and viewers, may benefit from further exploration of lessons in “intent” and “bias.”

    This is the introductory lesson for a larger unit "Who Am I Online?" To see the full lesson in context with the rest of the unit, visit our Google Site.

     

    Lesson Objective/Student Target:

    By the end of this lesson, you will be able to...

    • Define your dominant role online.
    • Explain the benefits of each type of online role.
    • Discuss the responsibilities and risks inherent in each type of online interaction.

    Overarching Questions:

    What is my role when I am online?

    When am I a producer, commenter, viewer, and/or swiper?

    Key Vocabulary:

    ProducerCreates, develops, remixes content to be shared online.
    CommenterEngages in online dialogs, posts comments, reviews and feedback.
    ViewerWatches videos, reads posts, looks at images.
    SwiperOpens shared links, scrolls through media, skims content