Author:
Molly Berger
Material Type:
Module
Tags:

Connected Reading in a Media Saturated World

Connected Reading in a Media Saturated World

Unit Overview

This unit is one of a number of example units that follow the reader to writer process used by OER unit writes in Washington through OSPI. Please contribute to this draft by adding comments and suggestions for implementation.

  1. Pre Unit Work: Skill Review or Assessment*, Student Action Planning
  2. Introduction: Motivate, Inquire, Set Your Unit Goals
  3. Examine: Gather, Read, Discuss
  4. Evaluate: Synthesize, Analyze, Find Your Voice
  5. Express: Share Your Voice
  6. Reflect: Reflect on Your Learning, Determine Next Steps

 

* SBA Interim Assessments can be effective here.

 

Unit Overview:

The purpose of this unit is to put students in the driver’s seat of their own reading by considering their own preferences and what it means to be a connected reader in our multi-media society.

This unit begins with students considering their own reading profile and inquiring about the impact of reading digital texts compared to print texts and what it means to be a connected reader in today’s multi-media society. Students then gather information by reading three texts on the topic which move them through modeling and guided practice to independent practice. As they read each text, they complete a comprehension chart. These will serve as formative assessments on the supported readings and as a reading assessment on the independent text. They will also be used as notes for an expository and an argumentative writing prompt. Teachers will also have the option of expanding the unit with student created graphic organizers and/or presentations.

Standards: ELA Standards are closely connected. A unit will often involve many standards, but in order for the standard to be considered as assessed, the task should require the student to work independently and should be completed at grade level.

Depending on teacher selection of assessments, this unit may address these reading standards:

Reading 11-12:1 Reading chart

Reading 11-12:2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Reading analysi

Depending on the teacher selection of writing prompts, this unit may address these standards:

Writing 11-12: 1a-e  Argument Essay

Writing 11-12: 2 a-f  Expository Essay

Writing 11-12: 4   Reading Profile

Writing 11-12: 5    Each essay

Writing 11-12: 6    Each essay

Assessments:

  • Pre Unit: Teachers may choose to select and administer one of the Assessment Interim Assessment as formative assessment and student reflection
  • Comprehension Check: reading assessment
  • What’s Your Reading Profile? metacognitive narrative full write (essay)
  • What Is Connected Reading Anyway? expository full write (essay)
  • Why the Buzz? Reading and Digital Devices: argument full write (essay)

Texts:

  • How Do You Read Best? Handout with quotes from
    •  “Is Google Making Us Stupid? What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains,” Nicholas Carr
    • Smarter than You Think, Clive Thompson
    • Connected Reading,  Kristen Hawley Turner and Troy Hicks
  • The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens, Ferris Jabr, Scientific American, April 11, 2013. http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/reading-paper-screens
  • Alternate text: Reading in a digital age - kappanonline.org

Naomi S. Baronhttp:  www.kappanonline.org/reading-digital-age/

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pre Unit Work

Pre unit work is designed to give both you, the teacher, and the student an understanding of the student’s strengths and weaknesses Using the Interim Assessments from the Smarter Balanced Assessment will allow you to monitor this with a consistent formative tool throughout the year. These are not meant to be graded. The assessments in the unit are to be used for grading, not the pre unit work. However, you may choose to do the student self-evaluation or reflection on it as part of their grade.

It is important that you set the tone for the pre work. It is meant to be a tool for both you and the student. You should note the strengths and weaknesses of the students so that you can adapt the unit to meet their needs. These may also help you to know if the student is in need of further intervention.

Based on the pre unit work, you may choose to do some skill work before starting the unit. You may use the SBA Digital Library or materials of your own.

After the students complete the pre unit work and you return it, have them complete the reflection in the student version. Set the tone for reflective practice by sharing that assessments are not just for a grade, they can be used to hep us learn if we do more than just look at the score.

Pre Unit Work: Where are you now? Where do you want to be? Close the Gap!

 

The purpose of pre unit work is for you and your teacher to understand your strengths and your weaknesses so that you can focus your learning. Learning is not only about working on weaknesses but also about building on your strengths. Understanding yourself as a learner allows you to be in the driver’s seat and make decisions that will benefit you now and in your future. Helping your teacher to understand you as a learner will help him/her to support you with learning activities and instruction more specific to your needs.

Many students get anxious at the thought of a test or assessment because so often there are consequences connected to them. The pre unit test is not that kind of assessment. Rather, it will help both you and your teacher to understand your needs and what approaches to take in the unit ahead.

 

Complete the test. When it is scored and returned to you, complete the following self-evaluation and reflection.

 

Questions 1 and 2 will be provided by your teacher.

 

1. Test title:

 

2. This test is designed to show my ability to:

 

3. Describe your confidence and comfort while taking the test:

 

4. As you took the test, which parts seemed easy for you to complete? Why do you think so?

 

5. As you took the test, which parts seemed challenging for you to complete? Why do you think so?

 

6. In reviewing your results, what was as you expected it to be? Why?

 

7. In reviewing your results, what was a surprise? Why?

 

8. What does this tell you about you as a learner? How will you build on your strengths and strengthen your weaknesses through this unit?

 

 

9. How can your teacher support you in what you in this?

 

 

Goal Setting

Student goal setting can be more meaningful after the self-assessment questions in Activity 1.

You will need to adapt the goal setting activity to the assessments you plan to assign in the unit. It currently has learning targets for all the listed assessments, so if you are not assigning one, just delete it from the student handout.  You may also adapt the goal setting activity to align with a format you use in your school or one that will work with your specific students; however, be sure that it gives them an overview of the learning in the module and allows them to consider what they know about themselves as learners.

Goal setting: Read the following learning goals for this unit. Which are familiar to you? Which represent something new? Which are most challenging?

 

 

 

Now, consider what you know about yourself as a learner. How do you learn best? What type of learning activities are most challenging?

 

Next, consider what you know about your schedule in the next 3-4 weeks of this unit. Consider sports, family activities, work, other classes etc. How will you need to manage your time to be successful on the targets?

 

Finally, write at least one learning goal and one time-management goal for yourself for this module.

 

 

Goal:

Measurement of Success

How will I know I am successful?

Learning goal:

 

 

 

 

Time management goal:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Introduction, Motivation and Inquiry

The purpose of this segment is to introduce the topic and facilitate student inquiry in order to activate background knowledge, to create a frame for the learning and to motivate.

Text 1: Reading Digitally and Your Developing Brain: Excerpts and Questions

1. Before students read, have them list their reading habits on a typical Monday during the school year. You may start this individually, then move to small group and then whole group. Have the students create a chart with these divisions:

Before school, morning at school, afternoon at school, after school, evening

 

For each division, have them list what they typically read during that time including items like street signs, menus, etc.

Example:

            Before school:

    • Text messages when wake up
    • Comics in newspaper at breakfast
    • Mom’s reminder about picking up little sister
    • Sports scores on ESPN app
    • Street signs as drive to school

Morning at school:

    • Reading choice time in 1st period-mystery novel
    • Etc.

2. Hang the charts where they can be seen by all. Have the students peruse them. Then ask, what do you notice? Draw out from them observations on types of media-digital, print, etc.; times of day; information vs. fiction, devices.

3. Next have them pose questions. “What does this make you wonder?” “What else do you need to know to draw accurate conclusions?” Draw from them questions about how print and digital are different. What do they prefer? Is one better than the other? Is that always or just sometimes? Why?

4. After the class discussion have the students complete a quick write for 5 or more minutes. What does this make me think? What do I want to know? Collect these and read them privately as they are a formative assessment and will help you understand your students. You may choose to give a “done” or “not done” score or score according to your policies. However, be sure to read each student’s responses. It will help you understand each as a reader and writer and give them a sense of purpose and accountability.

5. Give the students the handout, “How do you read best?” The handout has 3 excerpts of current writing on the issue of the impact of reading digital devices. This activity introduces the issue and serves as a model of the “What? Yes and/but? So what? Now what?” reading strategy. It also is an opportunity to work on synthesis of ideas from multiple sources.

Have the students read Excerpt 1 silently. Next read it out loud and have the students mark words that are new to them or used in an unusual way. This gives them a focus while you read but also will help as they work on the chart. Next complete the first column of the chart for this excerpt and discuss the ideas with the students.

Next have the students work in pairs. Give half the pairs the second excerpt and the other half the third excerpt. Have them read silently and then aloud to each other the excerpt. Then have them complete the chart. Next have the pairs match up with a pair that read the other excerpt. They should read  the passage out loud and share their responses allowing time to fill in the chart. Finally, wrap this up with a whole group by

  1. Clarifying any unclear answers from the chart.
  2. Asking the students what was something new from these excerpts that they had not given much thought to before?
  3. Asking them to write a statement synthesizing the connecting ideas of these three excerpts. You may want to define synthesis and discuss why it is an important skill in both reading and writing. Have the students write their statement at the bottom of the handout.

III. Examine: Gather, Read, Discuss

In this segment the students gather information through reading, viewing, and listening. Based on the pre unit work, provide the students with “fix-up” strategies and encourage them to self-assess.

Text 2: The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens, Ferris Jabr, Scientific American, April 11, 2013. http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/reading-paper-screens

Alternate text: Reading in a digital age - kappanonline.orgNaomi S. Baronhttp:  www.kappanonline.org/reading-digital-age/

 

Work through this article with your students moving from modeling to guided practice to independent practice.

1. Explain to the students that Text 2 is an informational article and that they will read the full text. Ask them, “When you have a full article to read, how do you approach it to help you understand the author’s ideas? What works for you? What is a challenge?” You may have them start this as a free write, then partner discussion then whole group or whatever works best to engage your students.  Draw from the students specific strategies that will help them be successful in comprehending and reading the entire text. (Many students read only part of an article or just skim it and then rely on class discussion to get the gist.)  Explain that you will be modeling strategies that they can try out and determine how or if to use independently.

2.  Preview the text

3. Read part 1 as a think aloud and then mark the text.

4. Read part 2 starting with 1 paragraph out loud and then have them mark the text. Have them read the next paragraph silently and mark the text. Share as a whole group. Formatively assess how well the students are understanding the text and how to mark the text.  Repeat this step for the next two paragraphs and again stop and share. Continue through all of part 2. Next have them finish the article and mark the text independently.

5. Hand out the “What? Yes and/but? So what? Now what?” chart. Have the students work in pairs to complete the chart. Monitor the students as they work. If needed, have them pause and as a whole group clarify. Then have them continue.

 

 

Text 2: The reading excerpts in Text 1 cued you to the topic of this unit. Your development of your own questions will help you focus your reading.

Text 2 is a full article. When you have a full article to read, how do you approach it to help you understand the author’s ideas? What works for you? What is a challenge? Discuss this with a partner and then the class.

Follow your teacher’s instructions for reading of the text:

The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens, Ferris Jabr, Scientific American, April 11, 2013. http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/reading-paper-screens

 

Examine: Gather, Read, Discuss (2)

Text 3: Have students find or provide them with a text that gives strategies for reading digital tests such as

Text Strategies for Reading on the World Wide Web https://writing.colostate.edu/guides/page.cfm?pageid=653&guideid=33

Now that the students have considered the issue of reading print and reading digitally, have them consider the “Now what?” question. So digital texts are not going away. How can we minimize the challenges and maximize the benefits? If at all possible, students should read this article or a similar one online to model the use of the digital tools. If it is not possible, then this should at least be projected and modeled.

 

1. To begin with, your questions will be similar to the ones from Text 2: “When you have a text to read online, how do you approach it to help you understand the author’s ideas? What works for you? What is a challenge? What digital tools do you use? When do you click on a link and when don’t you? What is distracting? How do you manage those distractions? As with Text 2, you may have them start this as a free write, then partner discussion then whole group or whatever works best to engage your students.  Draw from the students specific strategies that will help them be successful in comprehending and reading a digital text. Explain that this text is about reading online and will give them practice doing so.

 

2. Navigating this page will give the students to explore how content is broken up on web pages. It will serve as an excellent example of how this may enhance comprehension for some and hinder it for others. The landing page “Strategies for Reading on the World Wide Web” provides some motivation or encouragement for the students. The “Contents” column to the right gives them an overview as well as links. Have them preview the contents and ask them what seems familiar to them and what seems new.  Next give them time to read and gather information from the site.  Each of the pages linked on this is quite brief.

 

 

Then have them once again complete the What? Yes but/and? So what? Now what? chart. You may choose to have them do this independently or with a partner.

 

3. Discuss with the students their responses and ask them which of the strategies from the article they have used before and which new ones they might try.

 

Reteach/Extend as needed. Monitor student responses on the Text 3 chart to determine how well the students can complete the chart and if they are grasping the content. If students need some additional practice, scaffold with these shorter articles. Again, reading followed by the chart. If some need re teaching and others are ready to move on, provide those who are ready to move on with an extension.  Create an infographic…..


 

Examine: Gather, Read, Discuss (3)

Text 4 Independent Reading and Assessment:

Have students read this article or a similar one:

Independent Reading for Assessment: “Why Digital Reading Is No Substitute for Print,” by Naomi Baron, https://newrepublic.com/article/135326/digital-reading-no-substitute-print

Have the students complete the What? Yes And? So what? Now What? Chart independently. Their responses would reflect comprehension and align with unit work. In order to align with the stanards, you may add a requirement to site evidence to align with standards.

Your teacher will give you an article to read and complete the "What? Yes And? So what? Now What?"Chart  independently.

Evaluate: Synthesize, Analyze, Find Your Voice

Students are often adept at retelling someone else’s ideas. Being asked to decide what they think may be new, especially when it involves synthesizing and analyzing what they have read. They need to develop confidence in their thinking which will happen as they develop a deeper understanding of what they read. This activity helps them to compare ideas in order to synthesize what they have read. This leads them to form their own views. By having them mark the text in colors and discuss their findings with others, they dig deeper than just simple recall.

As the students work through the questions and discussions, monitor their responses to make sure they are developing this thinking.

 

Evaluate: Synthesize, Analyze, Find Your Voice

You now have four What? Yes And? So What? Now What? Charts on the texts we have read, so you have lots of information. You most likely had many thoughts about reading digitally or connected reading as you worked through each text. Now it is time to pull that thinking together. This involves analyzing, synthesizing, and evaluating what you have read in order to decide what you think. It is not about retelling what the authors think.

Work with a partner or in a group of 3 to complete steps 1-4. Complete step 5 independently.

 

 

1. To begin take out your three charts. Using a blue marker, go through each chart and mark the ideas that are similar or repeated in all three articles.

 

 

2. Next go through and mark in yellow the ideas that are unique to that article that the other two do not mention.

 

 

3. Now go through and mark in red anything that contradicts or opposes ideas in the other articles.

 

 

4. Is there one article that you think carries more weight in making an argument? If so, why do you think that is? (Consider the way it is written, the author’s credibility, the logic of the argument, etc.) If one does or does not stand out, be ready to explain why you think so.

 

 

5. Now consider what you have read, written, and discussed.  Review your questions you wrote at the beginning of the unit.  Free write on these questions:

 

    What do you think are the most important issues that rise from the readings?

    What do you think that we need to understand about reading digitally?

    What mean does it to be a connected reader?

    What should we do or not do about the issues of digital and connected reading?

 

 

 

Express: Share Your Voice (Explanation)

This unit lends itself to both an expository and an argumentative prompt. You may choose to do one or both. The value to doing both is that the prompts are different enough so the students do not feel as though they are repeating themselves. In addition, by starting with the expository prompt, students dig deeper into the issue and their opinions and so are ready for the argument.

Students often write with their peers or an academic audience in mind. This prompt asks them to consider a different audience and to do some audience analysis before they write. To model this, post or project three sentences from the newspaper or from a text you have read in class. Then have the students rewrite them for first graders, then for senior citizens. Discuss how the audience can affect content and style.

Writing Your Draft-Prompt 1: Explanation: Explanatory writing requires that you carefully consider your audience, what they know and what they need to know about your topic. Rather than taking a position, its purpose is for the audience to understand and idea, process, or issue. It focuses on the “What?” part of your chart.

1.  For this essay select an audience. This may be other teenagers, parents, teachers, business people, etc. Determine what then need to understand about connected reading. Even though this is not an argument, the reader needs to understand why this matters or the “so what”. Why should they bother to read what you have written?

 

Who is your audience?

Why is it important that they know about connected reading?

What do they already know?

What might they think is true that is actually not?

What will it take to establish your credibility?

Be ready to share your ideas with other students.

Follow your teacher’s instructions for sharing what you wrote. After sharing, you may revise or expand your thinking for your paper.

 

2. Focus: Consider what you have written and what you know about connected reading. What do you want your audience to understand after reading your essay?

Form this into a one sentence statement. This will be your thesis statement.

 

3. Mini outline: Sketch out an informal mini outline of main ideas. This is a starting point to focus your thinking and help you see your organization and development at a glance. Write your first thoughts. Then as a class review examples of development from model essays.

 

 

4. Write: For your first draft, use your mini outline and get your ideas down on paper (or screen). Remember if you reach a stumbling block you might

 

•             Step away for a couple of minutes to refresh your mind

•             Review your mini outline to focus your thinking

•             Work on another part of the paper and come back to the point you are struggling with

•             Get feedback from another student or your teacher

 

 

 

 

Section 10: Express: Share Your Voice (Argument)

Follow the same instructions as for the Explanatory prompt.

1. For this essay select an audience. This may be the same audience as for your expository essay or it may be a new one. Determine what you would like them understand and/or do about connected reading. Understanding in this case goes beyond just knowing in this case. It means understanding why this matters or the “so what” and therefore that something need to be done.

 

Who is your audience?

Why is it important that they know about connected reading?

What do they already know? Are they likely to agree or disagree with you?

What will it take to establish your credibility?

 

Be ready to share your ideas with other students.

Follow your teacher’s instructions for sharing what you wrote. After sharing, you may revise or expand your thinking for your paper.

 

2. Focus: Consider what you have written and what you know about connected reading. What do you want your audience to understand after reading your essay?

 

Form this into a one sentence statement. This will be your thesis statement

 

3. Mini outline: Sketch out an informal mini outline of main ideas. This is a starting point to focus your thinking and help you see your organization and development at a glance. Write your first thoughts. Then as a class review examples of development from model essays.

 

4. Write: For your first draft, use your mini outline and get your ideas down on paper (or screen). Remember if you reach a stumbling block you might

•             Step away for a couple of minutes to refresh your mind

•             Review your mini outline to focus your thinking

•             Work on another part of the paper and come back to the point you are struggling with

•             Get feedback from another student or your teacher

V. Express: Share Your Voice-Edit and Publish

Directions for the editing a publishing are in the student directions. You may want to have students use a checklist for frequent errors or other tools you have defeloped. This is often a good time for a mini lesson or review on problem you have seen in their work. Formatting of the paper is also up to you; however, have them consider the audience they have chosen. This is a good opportunity to look at choices in formatting in formal and more contemporary setttings.

Conventions (spelling, punctuation, language use, grammar) and format (paragraphs, headings, indentations, etc.) are important in making sure your audience undestands your message. You may have the greatest ideas in teh world, but if no one can read them, they won't make an impact.

1. Review your paper for conventions and make corrections. You may use tools such as grammar or spell check, but remember, they can only make suggestioins. It is up to you to make the correct choice.

2. Write your paper in the final format required for your audience, in this case, the expectation of he teacher. Remember that format is designed to help the readers understand your ideas. Paragraphing, indenting, bold print, etc. should all help the reader understand ideas and realtionships of ideas. They should not distrcat the reader.