Author:
Wendy Arch
Subject:
Literature, Educational Technology, Composition and Rhetoric, Reading Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
High School
Grade:
9, 10
Tags:
Discussion, Note-taking, Of Mice and Men, Station rotation, station-rotation
License:
Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike
Language:
English

Education Standards (18)

Of Mice and Men 4C's Discussion Day Activities

Of Mice and Men 4C's Discussion Day Activities

Overview

Activity Description: This activity is actually three different discussion-based activities to be used in a station rotation discussion day format.  It does require some prework with the double journal note-taking graphic organizer included in the resources.  This station rotation discussion format could be used with each chapter, a grouping of chapters, or at the end of the book.  If you are encompassing the entire book, this activity will most likely take several days.

Time needed for activity: 30-45 (10ish minutes per station)

Resources needed for activity: student notes using the double journal note-taking graphic organizer (linked here and as a PDF in the resources) paper for timelines or internet access to https://time.graphics/ or another online timeline maker, internet access to an online discussion tool like https://pinup.com/ or a discussion forum on your LMS.

Assessment strategies:  See the attached rubrics for possible assessment methods.

Pre-Discussion Notes

Prior to the discussion day, have students fill out the double journal note chart attached to the student resources.  This double journal note-taking graphic organizer asks students to record textual evidence in the first column.  Students are also prompted to “Write down a short summary of or the direct quotation from the part of the text…” in order to get the evidence out of the text.  The organizer also reminds them to “Try to include page numbers...” in order to make finding evidence during discussion easier.  In the second column, students are prompted to explain their thoughts.  They should think about how or why something mattered to them or the text and the effect it could have on the rest of the novel. This is the most important part of the activity since this is the part where students have to think metacognitively.  They have to think beyond the straightforward and consider all the ramifications and implications of what they have just read. Essentially, they have to decompress all of their thoughts and consider why they had them and what it all means. They have to look at the big picture.

Taking notes ... I know, not the most fun, but this is a necessary part of the learning process. 

Photo credit: Pitsch, https://docs.google.com/document/d/1g1Bp0wo0akHJwrV8V5HNknFqWopaqd2ZfldHmxYpLV0/edit?usp=sharing
Photo credit: https://pixabay.com/photo-2437110/

Use the double journal linked below to record both your textual evidence (notes of quotations or paraphrases of events from Of Mice and Men ) and your reaction to that evidence.  You will need ALL of these notes to accomplish the various activities on discussion day!

Of Mice and Men Double Journal Notes

Concepts & Craft

On discussion day, one station will be a collaborative workstation.  Students will work together to create a timeline of important events and conversations within each chapter or chapter grouping.  Students may do this "old school" by hand on butcher paper or extra large sticky notes, online via https://time.graphics/ or another online timeline maker.

Students will:

  1. Outline/summarize 5-10 important events or conversations that happen within the chapter.
  2. Attribute important examples of craft (figurative language, mood, irony, symbolism, etc) to the event or conversation they describe or impact.

As a group,

  1. Create a timeline with 5-10 important events or conversations that happen within the chapter.  Be sure to include page numbers for easier reference!
  2. After establishing your baseline of events and conversations, find examples of craft (figurative language, mood, imagery, symbolism, irony, etc) that describe or impact those events or conversations.
  3. In a different color or direction, add quotations that demonstrate those craft items to the timeline.
  4. See the attached rubric for how you will be assessed.
Timeline
Photo Credit: Luigi Mengato, https://flic.kr/p/gVUd2Z

 

Connections

On discussion day, another station will be an individual online discussion forum.  Students will post in whatever format you choose their connection to the chapter(s).  Students may do this "old school" by hand on butcher paper or extra large sticky notes, online via https://pinup.com/ or another online post-it site or discussion forum.  This could easily be done via whatever discussion forum environment you have with your LMS.

Students will:

  1. Post one connection they had or made to the text.  This could be a text-to-text, text-to-self, or text-to-world connection.
  2. Respond to at least one (1) other post with an explanation of how the first student's connection could change the way we think about the characters or Steinbeck's overall message.

On your own, 

  1. Access the class discussion by clicking _____
  2. Post one connection you had or made to the text.  This could be a text-to-text, text-to-self, or text-to-world connection.
  3. Respond to at least one (1) other post with an explanation of how your classmate's connection could change the way we think about the characters or Steinbeck's overall message.
  4. See the attached rubric for how your online discussion post will be assessed.

For BOTH posts, you need to cite specific textual evidence (a.k.a quotations or at least page numbers of conversations).  You also need to give more than the generic "I agree!/No way!" response.  Be thoughtful!

Post-it notes
Photo credit: Alexandra Koch, https://pixabay.com/photo-1975188/

 

Concerns

On discussion day, the final station will be a small group discussion with you.  Students will discuss their concerns or "red-flag" moments as a small group.  This also allows them to ask questions about parts they didn't understand and gives you a chance to make sure there is a universal understanding about the aspects of the text or chapters that you want.  This part is highly customizable.  Do what you need to do - discuss what you need to discuss.

Meet with me!!  Let's talk in a small group about the "red flag" moments you had while reading this chapter/section. 

  1. Bring your note sheet and be prepared to talk about the parts of the text that shocked, disturbed, or disgusted you. 
  2. You'll need to reference specific textual evidence by quoting directly from the text. 
  3. You'll also have to think about and explain how that concern could change the way you think about the characters or Steinbeck's overall message.
  4. See the attached rubric for how your post will be assessed.
Book club
Photo Credit: Junder Cheng, https://pixabay.com/photo-753891/