Author:
Jen Van Fleet
Subject:
Educational Technology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
Preschool, Lower Primary, Upper Primary, Middle School, High School
Tags:
Assignments, Google, Google Drive, Google-classroom, Iowa K-12 E-Curriculum, Student Work, iowa-k-12-e-curriculum
License:
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0
Language:
English
Media Formats:
Interactive, Text/HTML
Google Level 1 Certification: Unit 7, Lesson 3: Collect Assignments Effortlessly

Google Level 1 Certification: Unit 7, Lesson 3: Collect Assignments Effortlessly

Lesson Overview

Adapted from the Google for Edu Training Center Materials:

When students turn in worksheets and other physical work, we try to organize it neatly in folders or drawers. We use different colors, labels, stickers, and more to easily find student work later on. Today, we can use a variety of tools to collect and organize students’ digital work too.

Simplify the process of exchanging work between educators and learners by using Google Classroom and Drive. These tools can help teachers stay organized.

Students can save time and energy turning in assignments in the digital classroom as well.

  • Using Google Classroom, they can submit assignments with the click of a button.
  • Using Drive, they can easily move documents to a folder shared with their teacher, or create a document in that folder to begin with.

 

In this lesson, we’ll hear from a few teachers who are using Google tools to collect assignments in their classrooms.

Task 1: Collecting Student Assignments

Review how the following teachers talk about collecting student work using Google Classroom and Drive. 

Review how the following teachers talk about collecting student work using Google Classroom and Drive. 

I like to check how my students are working even before they submit their work. Using Classroom, I look for individual student documents to make sure they are on task and have understood the assignment. That way, when they are ready to turn in their work, I have a pretty good idea of what they are going to submit. If they need assistance, I can identify the help they need.

As an Art teacher, I get to work with all elementary students. Now, most of the work I do with the younger kids isn’t digital - it’s paintings, pictures, designs and sculptures - that type of thing. So, in order to preserve their work, we use the Google Classroom app on their tablets. What I get them to do is to take a picture or video of their work, and share it with me. This way, they can take their work home with them on their tablet and I’ve got a copy that I can grade. It’s also automatically saved in Drive so they won’t lose it.

One of my goals for this school year is to go paperless. We’re in a 1 to 1 Chromebook school, which makes it a lot easier to go digital. I use  Google Classroom to create assignments, and my students all get a notification. When they’re done with their work, all they do is click on the Turn in button on the top of their doc and I can see it registered in Classroom. And best of all, I can watch them hand things in in real time and I know exactly how many still need to submit their work.

I often have my students create Slide presentations at the end of a unit in order for them to demonstrate their learning. I ask them to synthesize their learning and identify key aspects. It’s important to make it visually appealing and to give proper credit to their references. When they are done, all they have to do is share their presentation with me, and I get an email notifying me they have turned in their work.

Task 2: Collecting Some Tips and Tricks

Though there are many ways students can hand in completed work, let’s go over some best practices for using Classroom and Google Drive. These simple tips and tricks can help you organize your digital files, avoid student confusion, and reduce frustration.

Though there are many ways students can hand in completed work, let’s go over some best practices for using Classroom and Google Drive. These simple tips and tricks can help you organize your digital files, avoid student confusion, and reduce frustration.

Using Classroom

Once you create an assignment in Google Classroom, your students have the ability to turn in their work. All sharing rights are controlled automatically in Google Classroom so educators don’t have to worry about tracking students down to share work with them. Using Google Classroom also cuts down on email traffic so email inboxes are not flooded with notifications of students sharing documents by the truckload. Each assignment contains the work of each student. Perfect organization with zero effort. Now lets look at some possible scenarios for collecting work:

Scenario 1

You want your students to submit a project they’ve been working on. Some of the project documents were distributed by the teacher but others were created from scratch by the students.

  • Best Practice: Students can submit everything through Google Classroom. Students click on Add (+ sign on mobile) to select a Drive file, local file, or URL to attach.

Scenario 2

Your students have to do/read/watch something, and you want a record of them completing the task, but do not have to turn anything in.

  • Best Practice: In this case, students can mark their assignment as done without turning in a document or a URL. Just have them click on the Mark as done button. In addition to students marking the assignment as done, have them draft a private comment to you about the activity they completed. This private comment could be a lingering question they have about the material, one fact they learned from the article, or one connection they can draw between this assignment and a previous topic covered in your classroom.

Scenario 3

You exchange all classwork using Google Classroom. The end of the semester is approaching and you want to be sure you have handed all work back to students. How would you ensure all work has been handed to students in Classroom?

  • Best Practice: Within each assignment there is a checkbox at the top left of the screen. This will select all students, whether they turned in work or not. The “Return” button will become active at that point. Click “Return” and all work will be returned to students so they retain ownership of their materials.

For more information on how to submit work, visit the Submit an Assignment Classroom help page.

Using Classroom

Once you create an assignment in Google Classroom, your students have the ability to turn in their work. All sharing rights are controlled automatically in Google Classroom so educators don’t have to worry about tracking students down to share work with them. Using Google Classroom also cuts down on email traffic so email inboxes are not flooded with notifications of students sharing documents by the truckload. Each assignment contains the work of each student. Perfect organization with zero effort. Now lets look at some possible scenarios for collecting work:

Scenario 1

You want your students to submit a project they’ve been working on. Some of the project documents were distributed by the teacher but others were created from scratch by the students.

  • Best Practice: Students can submit everything through Google Classroom. Students click on Add (+ sign on mobile) to select a Drive file, local file, or URL to attach.

Scenario 2

Your students have to do/read/watch something, and you want a record of them completing the task, but do not have to turn anything in.

  • Best Practice: In this case, students can mark their assignment as done without turning in a document or a URL. Just have them click on the Mark as done button. In addition to students marking the assignment as done, have them draft a private comment to you about the activity they completed. This private comment could be a lingering question they have about the material, one fact they learned from the article, or one connection they can draw between this assignment and a previous topic covered in your classroom.

Scenario 3

You exchange all classwork using Google Classroom. The end of the semester is approaching and you want to be sure you have handed all work back to students. How would you ensure all work has been handed to students in Classroom?

  • Best Practice: Within each assignment there is a checkbox at the top left of the screen. This will select all students, whether they turned in work or not. The “Return” button will become active at that point. Click “Return” and all work will be returned to students so they retain ownership of their materials.

For more information on how to submit work, visit the Submit an Assignment Classroom help page.

Using Drive

There are several ways students can, ‘turn in,’ assignments using Google Drive. These are some possible scenarios:

Scenario 1

You have only a few students, and they will be working on just a few assignments.

Scenario 2

You create shared folders for each student for them to submit their work with.

  • Best Practice: Students can either create a document and move it to their shared folder or create a document within the shared folder itself. You can easily identify changes to these folders by viewing the activity information.

Scenario 3

You ask your students to send you a message when they’re done with the assignment.

  • Best Practice: In Google Docs, students (and teachers) have the ability to send a message directly to a document’s, ‘collaborators.’

Using Drive

There are several ways students can, ‘turn in,’ assignments using Google Drive. These are some possible scenarios:

Scenario 1

You have only a few students, and they will be working on just a few assignments.

Scenario 2

You create shared folders for each student for them to submit their work with.

  • Best Practice: Students can either create a document and move it to their shared folder or create a document within the shared folder itself. You can easily identify changes to these folders by viewing the activity information.

Scenario 3

You ask your students to send you a message when they’re done with the assignment.

  • Best Practice: In Google Docs, students (and teachers) have the ability to send a message directly to a document’s, ‘collaborators.’

Task 3: Assessment: Creating Digital Assignments

You have now learned how to easily assign work to your students and collect it with Google tools. Let’s combine these skills with what you’ve just learned in a real world example.

Pick an assignment to give to your students next week.

Use the worksheet template linked here to build your own resource by replacing the title with your own and adding an image that makes sense. Then write the instructions that you would have given your students to follow. If you have another electronic resource in Drive you’d rather use that’s fine too.

Once you’ve designed your worksheet, share it with your own students using Classroom or Drive. If you are using Classroom, create an assignment and then select Make a copy for each student. If you are using Drive, share the file with your students as view-only (so they cannot modify the original), and have them create a copy of it.

If you chose Classroom, your students would click on the Turn in button when done. If you’re using Drive, your students would either share the completed document with you, or move it into a shared folder.

It’s that simple! You’ve now learned how all these skills combine to streamline your assigning and collecting, making things easier for you and your students.

You have now learned how to easily assign work to your students and collect it with Google tools. Let’s combine these skills with what you’ve just learned in a real world example.

Pick an assignment to give to your students next week.

Use the worksheet template linked here to build your own resource by replacing the title with your own and adding an image that makes sense. Then write the instructions that you would have given your students to follow. If you have another electronic resource in Drive you’d rather use that’s fine too.

Once you’ve designed your worksheet, share it with your own students using Classroom or Drive. If you are using Classroom, create an assignment and then select Make a copy for each student. If you are using Drive, share the file with your students as view-only (so they cannot modify the original), and have them create a copy of it.

If you chose Classroom, your students would click on the Turn in button when done. If you’re using Drive, your students would either share the completed document with you, or move it into a shared folder.

It’s that simple! You’ve now learned how all these skills combine to streamline your assigning and collecting, making things easier for you and your students.