Author:
Bonnie Waltz, Deanna Mayers, Tracy Rains
Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
High School
Grade:
9, 10, 11, 12
Tags:
Illness, International Laws, Travel
License:
Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
Language:
English
Media Formats:
Downloadable docs, Interactive, Text/HTML, Video

Problem Based Module: “Free” to Explore the World?

Problem Based Module: “Free” to Explore the World?

Overview

In this project, you will explore a real-world problem, and then work through a series of steps to analyze that problem, research ways the problem could be solved, then propose a possible solution to that problem. Often, there is no specific right or wrong solutions, but sometimes one particular solution may be better than others. The key is making sure you fully understand the problem, have researched some possible solutions, and have proposed the solution that you can support with information / evidence.

Begin by reading the problem statement in Step 1. Take the time to review all of the information provided in the statement, including exploring the websites, videos and / or and articles that are linked. Then work on steps 2 through 8 to complete this problem-based learning experience.

THE PROBLEM

THE PROBLEM

Analyzing fiction allows us to analyze life in general, especially people and the conflicts they face. To fully grasp a situation, you need to understand the underlying problem, the characters involved, the motives on both sides, and ultimately how it all gets resolved. For this experience, consider some global issues that involve conflict along with other aspects of analyzing fiction.

Historically, people have traveled throughout the world, visiting and sometimes settling in different countries (even before the countries were called countries). Over time, however, it became dangerous to venture into foreign territory without permission or with ill intent. Here is an article about an American man who was detained and tortured in North Korea. What is the central conflict? Who are the characters and what are their motives? Explore the idea of traveling freely, with legal and human rights.

Here is another case of an American citizen detained in Singapore. Though over twenty years have passed, this case drew attention because of the inhumane punishment the man received after committing a crime there. The conflict revolves around traveling abroad and adhering to different laws in different lands, even when the punishments seem unfair or inhumane.

On a different but still important scale, consider the argument surrounding travelers who carry new diseases or germs that a particular country hasn’t been exposed to or plagued by. Just as the Pilgrims arrived with diseases that eradicated portions of the Native American population, travelers still pose a threat when visiting (or moving to) new countries. Are we doing enough to keep all parties healthy? Are we certain that illnesses won’t be spread to the masses? Or is this all a part of the human experience, being able to explore the world and settling where we want, regardless of health and legal risks?

DEFINE THE ISSUE

DEFINE THE ISSUE

Think

  1. How could you sort/classify/categorize this problem? What type of problem is it?

  2. What is the motive/underlying theme/message?

Do

  • Use your words to summarize the problem in a 4-6 sentences.

WHAT DO YOU KNOW

WHAT DO YOU KNOW

Think

  1. List the keywords from the case study. Put a check beside words you are familiar with prior to starting this project.

  2. Brainstorm and categorize to create a list of the significant parts of this problem.

Do

  • Make a chart showing what you know that will help you solve the problem.

ANALYZE THE CASE INFORMATION

ANALYZE THE CASE INFORMATION

Think

  1. Determine if the information is based on fact or opinion.

  2. Distinguish relevant/irrelevant information from the current case study and provided resources.

  3. How would you compare/contrast the constraints and opportunities of the problem?

  4. Infer and explain information that is important to the case solution, but is not explicitly in the case

Do

  • Develop and write out the problem statement in your own words.

POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS

POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS

Think

  1. What are other possible outcomes?

  2. Analyze and explain the multiple perspectives/solutions within this case.

  3. What conclusions can you draw from your research?

  4. Generate alternative solutions

Do

  • Gather, organize, and interpret information from multiple sources.

  • Based on what you know, defend your preferred solution.

RESEARCH SOLUTION

RESEARCH SOLUTION

Think

  1. Research the knowledge and data you need to support the solution and fill in missing gaps

  2. Investigate and draw conclusions about how the preferred solution impacts the world today.

  3. What changes to your preferred solution will/have you made?

  4. What evidence justifies your solution?

Do

  • Select decision criteria
  • Analyze and evaluate alternatives

CONSTRUCT CONCLUSIONS

CONSTRUCT CONCLUSIONS

Think

  1. Review your research and construct argument, providing  supporting documentation to convince others of your solution.

  2. Decide if you will be creating an argument or a model to illustrate your solution.

Do

  • Develop a plan/proposal with  supporting documentation to convince others of your solution.
  • Make sure to include the following items in your proposal.  Feel free to include additional information as you need to explain your solution.
  • Describe your findings and/or recommendations
  • List the problem statement questions.
  • Break down the data you gathered into an analysis that supports your solution(s) or recommendation(s)
  • Summarize the process you used and options considered, along difficulties you encountered.
  • Your presentation can be a video of yourself presenting your model or argument or it can be a animated video using infographics and other images.

REFLECTIONS

REFLECTIONS

Think

  1. How did you decide to…?

  2. What seemed difficult?

  3. What seemed (or eventually became) easy?

  4. If you were to do any part of this over, what would it be and how would you change it?

  5. What did you learn about the topic or about yourself during this project?

Do

Write a 3-5 paragraph reflection essay includes these three parts:

  1. Include an introduction where you focus directly on explaining what aspect of your experiences you will discuss in the reflection.

  2. The body of the essay should explain how you have changed or what you have learned. Make certain to explain what things caused the you to change.

  3. In the conclusion of a reflective essay, you should discuss  how you have changed and the effect of those changes. You should share how you think the experience will change you in the future.