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  • WY.SCI.MS.ESS1.2
Beyond the Milky Way
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

When we look at the night sky, we see stars and the nearby planets of our own solar system. Many of those stars are actually distant galaxies and glowing clouds of dust and gases called nebulae. The universe is an immense space with distances measured in light years. The more we learn about the universe beyond our solar system, the more we realize we do not know. Students are introduced to the basic known facts about the universe, and how engineers help us explore the many mysteries of space.

Subject:
Engineering
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Denise W. Carlson
Jane Evenson
Jessica Butterfield
Jessica Todd
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Sam Semakula
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Coma Cluster of Galaxies
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This classroom activity for high school students uses a collection of Hubble Space Telescope images of galaxies in the Coma Cluster. Students study galaxy classification and the evolution of galaxies in dense clustered environments.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Keely Finkelstein, McDonald Observatory
Date Added:
06/24/2014
Gravity and Orbits
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Move the sun, earth, moon and space station to see how it affects their gravitational forces and orbital paths. Visualize the sizes and distances between different heavenly bodies, and turn off gravity to see what would happen without it!

Subject:
Astronomy
Physics
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Chris Malley
Emily Moore
John Blanco
Jon Olson
Kathy Perkins
Noah Podolefsky
Sam Reid
Trish Loeblein
Date Added:
02/07/2011
Gravity and Orbits (AR)
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Move the sun, earth, moon and space station to see how it affects their gravitational forces and orbital paths. Visualize the sizes and distances between different heavenly bodies, and turn off gravity to see what would happen without it!

Subject:
Astronomy
Physics
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Chris Malley
Emily Moore
John Blanco
Jon Olson
Kathy Perkins
Noah Podolefsky
Patricia Loblein
Sam Reid
Date Added:
02/07/2011
The Great Gravity Escape
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Students use water balloons and a length of string to understand how the force of gravity between two objects and the velocity of a spacecraft can balance to form an orbit. They see that when the velocity becomes too great for gravity to hold the spacecraft in orbit, the object escapes the orbit and travels further away from the planet.

Subject:
Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Chris Yakacki
Daria Kotys-Schwartz
Geoffrey Hill
Janet Yowell
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Timothy M. Dittrich
Date Added:
10/14/2015
Is There Life in Space?
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

In this investigation, students will explore the question: Can there be life outside of Earth? Students will use planet hunting models to discover how scientists find new planets and perform simulated spectroscopic measurements to determine if the chemical requirements for life are present.

Subject:
Engineering
Education
Life Science
Astronomy
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Data Set
Diagram/Illustration
Interactive
Lecture Notes
Provider:
Concord Consortium
Provider Set:
Concord Consortium Collection
Author:
The Concord Consortium
Date Added:
12/12/2011
Launching a Satellite
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Isaac Newton's famous thought experiment about what would happen if you launched a cannon from a mountaintop at a high velocity comes to life with an interactive computer model. You are charged with the task of launching a satellite into space. Control the angle and speed at which the satellite is launched, and see the results to gain a basic understanding of escape velocity.

Subject:
Education
Mathematics
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Data Set
Provider:
Concord Consortium
Provider Set:
Concord Consortium Collection
Author:
The Concord Consortium
Date Added:
12/11/2011
Model of a Black Hole
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Many children may have heard of black holes and already have the understanding that they are ‘bottomless wells’. If something falls into a black hole, it is impossible for it to escape—even light cannot escape and is swallowed. The lack of light is how black holes get their name. These objects are mysterious and interesting, but they are not easy to explain. This activity will allow children to visualize, and therefore help them decompose, the concepts of space-time and gravity, which are integral to understanding these appealing objects.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Game
Interactive
Provider:
International Astronomical Union
Provider Set:
astroEDU
Author:
Monica Turner, UNAWE
Date Added:
12/13/2013
My Solar System
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Build your own system of heavenly bodies and watch the gravitational ballet. With this orbit simulator, you can set initial positions, velocities, and masses of 2, 3, or 4 bodies, and then see them orbit each other.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Danielle Harlow
Michael Dubson
Mindy Gratny
Date Added:
11/15/2007
Not So Lost in Space
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Students learn how engineers navigate satellites in orbit around the Earth and on their way to other planets in the solar system. In accompanying activities, they explore how ground-based tracking and onboard measurements are performed. Also provided is an overview of orbits and spacecraft trajectories from Earth to other planets, and how spacecraft are tracked from the ground using the Deep Space Network (DSN). DSN measurements are the primary means for navigating unmanned vehicles in space. Onboard spacecraft instruments might include optical sensors and an inertial measurement unit (IMU).

Subject:
Engineering
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Janet Yowell
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Penny Axelrad
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Plot Your Course - Navigation
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

In this unit, students learn the very basics of navigation, including the different kinds of navigation and their purposes. The concepts of relative and absolute location, latitude, longitude and cardinal directions are explored, as well as the use and principles of maps and a compass. Students discover the history of navigation and learn the importance of math and how it ties into navigational techniques. Understanding how trilateration can determine one's location leads to a lesson on the global positioning system and how to use a GPS receiver. The unit concludes with an overview of orbits and spacecraft trajectories from Earth to other planets.

Subject:
Engineering
Physical Geography
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Date Added:
10/14/2015
A Roundabout Way to Mars
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Students explore orbit transfers and, specifically, Hohmann transfers. They investigate the orbits of Earth and Mars by using cardboard and string. Students learn about the planets' orbits around the sun, and about a transfer orbit from one planet to the other. After the activity, students will know exactly what is meant by a delta-v maneuver!

Subject:
Engineering
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Janet Yowell
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Penny Axelrad
Date Added:
10/14/2015
Solar System SciPack Meteorite and Comet Simulations
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This is a 30 minute lesson where students will be able to:
1. Describe the size, composition, and motion of meteors and comets.
2. Discuss the similarities and differences in comets and meteors.
3. Explain:
a. what happens to meteors as they fall through the atmosphere
b. why comet debris is observed as a meteor shower from the Earth
c. how the planet's gravitational forces affect a comet's orbit.
d. why we see a comet's tail.
e. why a comet disintegrates when it gets close to the sun.

Subject:
Applied Science
Physical Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Maggie Bly
Date Added:
06/20/2018