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  • WY.ELA-Literacy.W.7.7
7th Grade Historical Literacy Units
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7th Grade Historical Literacy consists of two 43 minute class periods. Writing is one 43 minute block and reading is another. The teacher has picked themes based on social studies standards, and a read-aloud novel based on social studies serves as the mentor text for writing and reading skills. More social studies content is addressed in reading through teaching nonfiction reading skills and discussion.
Standards reflect CCSS ELA, Reading, and Social Studies Standards.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Jennifer Mortensen
Jessica Leonard
Date Added:
04/16/2019
7th grade poetry
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Educational Use
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The 7th grade poetry unit gives an in depth approach to poetry involving the four strands within the core. I've included worksheets, rubrics, and answers keys where applicable. I have also used literature examples from the core.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Utah Education Network
Date Added:
08/12/2013
Art and Ecology
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Some Rights Reserved
Rating
3.66666666667 stars

Artists are often particularly keen observers and precise recorders of the physical conditions of the natural world. As a result, paintings can be good resources for learning about ecology. Teachers can use this lesson to examine with students the interrelationship of geography, natural resources, and climate and their effects on daily life. It also addresses the roles students can take in caring for the environment. Students will look at paintings that represent cool temperate, warm temperate, and tropical climates.
In this lesson students will: Identify natural resources found in particular geographic areas; Discuss ways in which climate, natural resources, and geography affect daily life; Apply critical-thinking skills to consider the various choices artists have made in their representations of the natural world; Make personal connections to the theme by discussing ways they can be environmental stewards; Identify natural resources found in particular geographic areas; Discuss ways in which climate, natural resources, and geography affect daily life; Apply critical-thinking skills to consider the various choices artists have made in their representations of the natural world; Make personal connections to the theme by discussing ways they can be environmental stewards.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Visual Arts
Ecology
Physical Geography
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Gallery of Art
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Can YOU save the Roman Empire?
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In this problem-based learning module, students will use their knowledge of the ancient Roman Empire and will work to analyze critical theories historians agree contributed to the fall of Rome. Students will then work to compare the problems faced by the Romans with problems citizens of the United States still largely face today. Through this investigation, students should recognize how modern technology, government agencies, laws and resources help to solve societal problems that could have once destroyed an empire. With this new understanding, students should work to present a solution to a major problem that plagued the Roman Empire during the years leading up to its collapse.

Subject:
English Language Arts
History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Blended Learning Teacher Practice Network
Date Added:
07/23/2018
Climate Change Summit by T. Goldring & T. Kabealo (47.WCS)
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Through a mock summit simulation, students explore current questions about climate change issues and the validity of climate change claims. Students argue for and against implementation of solutions, using research to support arguments. During the research phase, students use an online Chrome extension (Diigo) to create a shared database of current climate change multimedia information that will support their claims. During the summit, students assume the role of an ambassador for a specific country. Then, students use their collected research to take a position which either validates or denies current climate change assertions such as: Climate change is a global issue and demands a unified response.Climate change is caused by human activity. We should demand utility companies to use 20% electricity from renewable energy sources.We should regulate CO2 as a pollutant.  Finally, students create a multimedia presentation that represents their country’s final stance on the climate change issue and the summit’s suggested solutions.Standards:Ohio Science (Grade 7)CCSS ELA (Grade 7) 

Subject:
Environmental Science
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Cathryn Chellis
Blended Learning Teacher Practice Network
Date Added:
11/09/2018
Cultivating Washington: The History of Our State's Food, Land, and People
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Rating
5.0 stars

The Cultivating Washington curriculum is intended to be a go-to resource for Washington state middle school educators seeking student-centered instructional materials that make learning about the history of the Pacific Northwest more relevant and meaningful for students.In addition, it is a resource for agricultural education teachers, parents, and community members interested in helping students discover the history and development of agriculture in the state of Washington.

Subject:
Career and Technical Education
Agriculture
U.S. History
Social Science
Cultural Geography
Economics
Political Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Module
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Author:
Barbara Soots
Jerry Price
Washington OSPI OER Project
Date Added:
09/02/2020
Decisions That Define Us
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5.0 stars

Students learn about the controversial history of a mural in Anacortes, WA, and consider what it would take to create a more inclusive and accurate mural in Anacortes today. Then students learn about the tribes, immigrants, and settlers in the region where they live and how their stories are represented in local murals in public spaces. Students draw on what they have learned to respond to the unit driving question: What decisions and whose stories define Washington state? Then, drawing on local resources such as tribal members, historical societies, and museums, students work in teams to propose a new mural that tells an inclusive story of the people and place where they live.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Module
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Author:
Educurious .
Educurious .
Date Added:
12/14/2021
DocsTeach
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CC BY-NC-SA
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5.0 stars

Docs Teach is the online tool for teaching with documents, from the National Archives.
* Choose from thousands of primary sources for use in classroom activities.
* Find and use activities crafted by educators using documents from the National Archives.
* Create your own interactive learning activities.

Subject:
U.S. History
Social Science
Political Science
Material Type:
Interactive
Lesson
Primary Source
Author:
United States. National Archives and Records Administration.
Date Added:
03/16/2020
Grade 7 ELA Module 2A
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In this module, students explore the issue of working conditions, both historical and modern day. As they read and discuss both literary and informational text, students analyze how people, settings, and events interact in a text and how an author develops a central claim. Students strengthen their ability to discuss specific passages from a text with a partner, write extended text-based argument and informational pieces, and conduct a short research project. At the end of the module, students will have a better understanding of how working conditions affect workers and the role that workers, the government, consumers, and businesses play in improving working conditions. The first unit focuses on Lyddie, a novel that tells the story of a young girl who goes to work in the Lowell mills, and explores the issue of working conditions in industrializing America. This unit builds students’ background knowledge about working conditions and how they affect workers, and centers on the standard RL.7.3, which is about how plot, character, and setting interact in literature. As an end of unit assessment, students write an argument essay about Lyddie’s choices regarding her participation in the protest over working conditions. The second unit moves to more recent history and considers the role that workers, the government, and consumers all play in improving working conditions. The central text in Unit 2 is a speech by César Chávez, in which he explains how the United Farm Workers empowered farmworkers. Unit 2 focuses on reading informational text, and students practice identifying central ideas in a text, analyzing how an author develops his claims, and identifying how the sections of the text combine to build those ideas. This unit intentionally builds on Odell Education’s work, and if teachers have already used the Chávez speech and lessons, an alternate text is suggested with which to teach the same informational text standards. In the End of Unit 2 Assessment, students apply their understanding of text structure to a new speech. Unit 3 focuses on the research standards (W.7.7 and W.7.8): through an investigation of working conditions in the modern day garment industry, students explore how businesses can affect working conditions, both positively and negatively. As a final performance task, students create a consumer’s guide to working conditions in the garment industry. This teenage consumer’s guide provides an overview of working conditions and offers advice to consumers who are interested in working conditions in the garment industry.

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
05/12/2013
How Can I Promote Healthy Lifestyles in My Community?
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In this problem-based learning module, students will research health issues that are relevant to elementary students k-3. Students will look at perceptions, influences, education, research and discussion.Information will be provided through various ways including direct instruction, small group instruction by the classroom teacher, online research, and real-life research. Students will research media influences on health and develop a student-produced Public Service Announcement that will be shared with their peers as well as k-3 students in the district. Students will also have the opportunity to learn from each other and share their ideas with community stakeholders and plan next steps to promote healthy lifestyles in our community.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Blended Learning Teacher Practice Network
Date Added:
11/21/2017
Remix
Info-luencer: Media Literacy and Civics
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This resource includes multiple lesson plans developed by Washington State teacher John Zingale and can be taught as part of in-person, hybrid, or remote instructional settings. The core content areas include social studies, civics, and media literacy and are designed for use with students in grades 6-12. Additional integrations include ELA, world languages, mathematics, physical education and science. These lessons integrate both state and national civics instruction using project-based and collaborative learning strategies. Features of these lessons include:student researchcollaborative learningdigital learning strategieslateral readingdesign and creation of infographicsTo support these lessons, additional resources are provided to help educators and families with understanding and teaching information and media literacy to young people. Resources include:introductions to media literacyeducator guidesparent guidesstudent learning standards

Subject:
Graphic Arts
Education
Educational Technology
Reading Informational Text
U.S. History
Political Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Author:
Mark Ray
Date Added:
06/24/2021
Native American Stories Science Connections
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Rating
4.66666666667 stars

The original Native American story component lesson was developed as part of an Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) and Washington State Leadership and Assistance for Science Education Reform (LASER) project funded through an EPA Region 10 grant. The stories were told by Roger Fernandes of the Lower Elwha Klallam tribe. Mr. Fernandes has been given permission by the tribes to tell these stories.As these lessons and stories were shared prior to the adoption of the Washington State Science Learning Standards in 2013, there was a need to align these stories with the current science standards. This resource provides a current alignment and possible lesson suggestions on how these stories can be incorporated into the classroom. This alignment work has been funded by the NGSS & Climate Science Proviso of the Washington State Legislature as a part of North Central Educational Service District's award.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Arts and Humanities
Environmental Studies
Education
Elementary Education
Life Science
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
MECHELLE LALANNE
Carissa Haug
Ellen Ebert
Barbara Soots
Date Added:
04/28/2020
PEI SOLS MS Food Waste
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CC BY
Rating
4.0 stars

Food waste is a major contributor to greenhouse gas. Wasted food and the resources to produce that food are responsible for approximately 8% of global greenhouse gas emissions. In this storyline, students learn about the resources required to produce food through following the carbon cycle and discover how food waste contributes to climate change. They will also learn the farm to table transport chain as well as how to conduct a food waste audit. Finally, the students will research solutions to the problem of food waste that can be applicable to their own lives, their school, and their community. 

Subject:
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Pacific Education Institute
Date Added:
06/16/2020
PEI SOLS Middle School Coastal Hazards: Sea Level Rise
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CC BY
Rating
4.0 stars

Sea level is rising due to climate changes that result from increased emissions of greenhouse gases. In this storyline, students will explore mechanisms of sea level rise and the impacts on Indigenous peoples along with other groups such as urban communities. Natural hazards such as erosion, storm surges, and flooding are intensified by sea level rise. The effects on natural resources, the economies built from those natural resources, and land usage in general can be predicted by utilizing current and historical data.

Subject:
Engineering
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Pacific Education Institute
Date Added:
06/15/2021
PEI SOLS Middle School Wetlands: Ecosystem Services
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CC BY
Rating
4.0 stars

Coastal wetlands bring many benefits to ecosystems including their ability to sequester carbon and mitigate fluctuations in sea levels. Students will understand the ecosystem benefits of coastal wetlands with a focus on the potential of estuaries for climate related planning.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Pacific Education Institute
Date Added:
06/21/2021
Should we remove the Electron Dam?
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Rating
4.0 stars

 This inquiry unit leads students through the different perspectives behind a decision to have a dam removed. This unit looks at similar Washington state dam removal decisions as well as the complex issue of having the Election dam removed near Puyallup, WA. Students will be introduced to the stories and traditional ways of knowing about salmon that the Puyallup Tribe has built their culture upon. Then they will explore the science behind hydroelectricity and build models to discover how carbon neutral energy is gathered through hydro dams. This inquiry unit ends with students researching different perspectives surrounding the current (2021) decision to remove the Electron dam including: the Tribe’s Fishery department, the ecosystem, the city council, the fishermen and the hydro-electrical company who currently owns the dam. With their research, students will do a socratic seminar to mimic the court case lawsuit that is ongoing against the Electron Dam. 

Subject:
U.S. History
Hydrology
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Elsie Mitchell
Date Added:
06/11/2021