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  • WY.ELA-Literacy.RI.6.4
Alliteration, Onomatopoeia, and Idiom
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This seminar will introduce three of eight types of figurative language (alliteration, onomatopoeia, and idiom).  Through mainly fictional texts( tongue twisters, comics, songs, etc.), you will  identify these types of figurative language, determine their meanings, and  formulate project-based activities to prove your understanding of these common figurative language types.StandardsCC.1.2.5.F  Determine the meaning of words and phrase as they are used in grade-level text, including interpretation of figurative language. 

Subject:
Elementary Education
Reading Foundation Skills
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Tracy Rains
Date Added:
02/06/2018
The Blizzard of '49
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The Storm of the Century: The Blizzard of 49 is a WyomingPBS documentary. This documentary tells the story of the worst series of storms in Wyoming's history. But for all the tragedy and loss, suffering, and death, there was hope and heroism, unselfish sacrifice, and generosity. Students will learn about the Blizzard of 1949 and how the State of Wyoming and the Civil Air Patrol responded.

The resource videos are based on this documentary and include associated lesson plans. There are three video clips. Clip one starts at the beginning and ends at 2:50 minutes, Clip two begins at 3:50 minutes and ends at 5:50 minutes, clip three begins at 6:00 minutes and ends at 8:41 minutes.

Sensitive: This resource contains material that may be sensitive for some students. Teachers should exercise discretion in evaluating whether this resource is suitable for their class.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Speaking and Listening
Ecology
Physical Geography
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Provider:
Wyoming PBS
Date Added:
09/18/2019
Common Core Curriculum Grade 6 ELA - Making Evidence-Based Claims
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Making Evidence-Based Claims ELA/Literacy Units empower students with a critical reading and writing skill at the heart of the Common Core: making evidence-based claims about complex texts. These units are part of the Developing Core Proficiencies Program. This unit develops students' €abilities to make evidence-based claims through activities based on a close reading of the Commencement Address Steve Jobs delivered at Stanford University on June, 2005.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Primary Source
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
04/04/2013
Figurative Language: Hyperbole/Exaggeration/Adage/Proverb
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During this seminar you will be exposed to the last of the figurative language types (hyperbole,  exaggeration, adage and proverb).  This seminar is unique because depending where you research will affect how you perceive them.  Some sites express them as different;  hyperboles vs. exaggerations  and adages vs. proverbs.  On the other hand, some websites view them as one and the same.  A hyperbole is a type of exaggeration and an adage is a type of proverb.  Regardless of how you view them, the most important piece of this seminar is to be able to interpret their meanings when used in texts, songs, movies, life experiences, etc. StandardsCC.1.2.5.F  Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in grade-level text, including interpretation of figurative language.

Subject:
Elementary Education
Reading Foundation Skills
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Tracy Rains
Date Added:
02/06/2018
How Does Tribal Government Work? Wyoming's Native Americans
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Tribal Government on the Wind River Reservation is in a state of flux. In the accompanying lessons plans (found in the Support Materials), learn how the Eastern Shoshone and Northern Arapaho tribes govern their people, what is the relationship between Tribal, State, and Federal government?

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

Students will demonstrate an understanding of the workings of tribal government on the Wind River Reservation by creating a written report.
Students will understand the differences and similarities between state, tribal and federal governments and their functions, structures, and powers.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Date Added:
09/16/2019
Miss Indian America
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The Miss Indian America Pageant was launched by Sheridan residents in the 1950's to combat discrimination. In the accompanying lesson plan (found in the Support Materials) students will view the story told through the eyes of Miss Indian America title holders who held a reunion in 2013, serving as grand marshals in the Sheridan, WY Rodeo parade and commemorating a legacy of bridging cultures.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

Students will identify the reason why the town of Sheridan, WY started the Miss Indian America Pageant.
Students will define the given vocabulary words.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Provider:
Wyoming PBS
Date Added:
09/17/2019
Preserving the Ways: Culture & Tradition
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Learn what the futures of the Eastern Shoshone and Northern Arapaho tribes are, and how the tribes will retain their culture and tradition while preparing to move into the future? In the accompanying lesson plan (found in the Support Materials) students will understand the importance of education and perservation of the culture.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

Students will demonstrate an understanding about the importance of education and preservation of the language and culture among the Northern Arapaho and Eastern Shoshone Tribe from the past, present, and future.
Students will learn about the Federal Indian Policy to civilize Native Americans through the establishment of Native American Boarding Schools incorporating key vocabulary words.
Students will learn about how the practice of forced assimilation contributed to the diminished use of the Shoshone and Arapaho people’s lifestyle, languages, and traditions.
Students will discuss the development of Indian boarding schools in the United States and Wyoming.
Students will analyze the differences between the early educational experiences of the Native American and non-native students.
Students will examine the importance of education as a value that the Shoshone, Arapaho, and non-native communities share.
Students will consider how Native American students and non-native students can learn from each other to dispel the myths and stereotypes that exist in contemporary society.
Students will learn why oral traditions are important.
Students will understand why respect for elders is important in the tribe.
Students will gain an awareness of why traditional dancing and singing is important to traditions and culture.
Students will explore the significance of the buffalo to the Shoshone people living on the Wind River Reservation.
Students will learn that through traditional concepts of understanding, the Shoshone people, as well as many other Plains tribes, were able to survive through their sustenance on the buffalo.
Students will discuss the relationship that Native American people have with the buffalo (i.e., spiritual, sustenance, etc.) and how oral traditions play a critical role in the preservation of Native ways of knowing.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Speaking and Listening
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Provider:
Wyoming PBS
Date Added:
09/17/2019
Similes, Metaphors, and Personification
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This seminar will introduce three of eight types of figurative language (simile, metaphor, personification).  Through song lyrics, poems, videos, interactive activities, and collaboration, you will learn to recognize, determine meanings, and identify comparisons within similes, metaphors, and personification examples.StandardsCC.1.2.5.F  Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in grade-level text, including interpretation of figurative language.

Subject:
Elementary Education
Reading Foundation Skills
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Tracy Rains
Date Added:
02/07/2018
Who are the Eastern Shoshone?
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Learn how and when the Eastern Shoshone came to Wyoming, what are the Shoshone values, and what are the people of the Eastern Shoshone like? In the accompanying lessons plans (found in the Support Materials), students will gain an understanding of the Fort Bridger Treaty of 1868 including its importance to the state of Wyoming and the Eastern Shoshone Tribe in 1868 and today. The American Bison, or Buffalo as preferred by most tribes, has a significant existence among the Native American people. For thousands of years, the great American Buffalo roamed the Great Plains, migrating from north to south, searching for areas on which to thrive. The Shoshone people depended on the buffalo for many things that included food, clothing, and shelter. Every part of the buffalo was used and provided for the people.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

Students will study (Highlight, paraphrase and report) the Treaty of 1868 between the Eastern Shoshone Tribe and the United States Government.
Students will learn about the Eastern Shoshone people through the use of research and technology.
Students will understand that the history of the Shoshone people in the Wind River Mountains dates back thousands of years.
Students will understand that the circle of life continues in a perpetual cycle and is passed on through oral tradition. These stories often taught a lesson to young people.
Students will understand the indigenous perspective of interconnectedness. Students will understand how bison populations were devastated by western expansion.
Students will learn how to construct, read, compare and analyze different population graphs.
Students will understand how the diets of the Shoshone people varied depending on the areas in which they lived.
Students will acquire knowledge of the Wind River Reservation communities and be able to identify these locations on a map.
Students will be able to further describe how their culture has shaped them.
Students will be able to define the concept of culture.
Students will be able to explain some of the attributes of culture.

Subject:
English Language Arts
U.S. History
Mathematics
Geometry
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Provider:
Wyoming PBS
Date Added:
09/17/2019
Who are the Northern Arapaho?
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Students will gain an understanding of the Northern Arapaho people located on the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming. In the accompanying lessons plans (found in the Support Materials), students will learn how the Northern Arapaho come to Wyoming, what are the Arapaho values, and why were Arapaho tribal names changed?

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

Students will be able to evaluate what geographical places were used by the Arapaho people and understand how historical events changed the future for the Arapaho people.
Students will compare and contrast between their social and ceremonial structures.
Students will understand the hierarchy of the Arapaho Tribe.
Students will analyze how their social and ceremonial structures contribute to their cultural identity.

Subject:
English Language Arts
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Provider:
Wyoming PBS
Date Added:
09/17/2019