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  • WA.SS.G2.6-8.4
Cultivating Washington: The History of Our State's Food, Land, and People
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
5.0 stars

The Cultivating Washington curriculum is intended to be a go-to resource for Washington state middle school educators seeking student-centered instructional materials that make learning about the history of the Pacific Northwest more relevant and meaningful for students.In addition, it is a resource for agricultural education teachers, parents, and community members interested in helping students discover the history and development of agriculture in the state of Washington.

Subject:
Career and Technical Education
Agriculture
U.S. History
Social Science
Cultural Geography
Economics
Political Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Module
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Author:
Barbara Soots
Jerry Price
Washington OSPI OER Project
Date Added:
09/02/2020
Decisions That Define Us
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
5.0 stars

Students learn about the controversial history of a mural in Anacortes, WA, and consider what it would take to create a more inclusive and accurate mural in Anacortes today. Then students learn about the tribes, immigrants, and settlers in the region where they live and how their stories are represented in local murals in public spaces. Students draw on what they have learned to respond to the unit driving question: What decisions and whose stories define Washington state? Then, drawing on local resources such as tribal members, historical societies, and museums, students work in teams to propose a new mural that tells an inclusive story of the people and place where they live.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Module
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Author:
Educurious .
Educurious .
Date Added:
12/14/2021
Injustice at Home | The Japanese-American Experience of the World War II Era
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
5.0 stars

As part of Washington's Kip Tokuda Memorial Civil Liberties Public Education Program, which strives to educate the public regarding the history and the lessons of the World War II exclusion, removal, and detention of persons of Japanese ancestry, KSPS Public Television and Eastern Washington educators Starla Fey, Leslie Heffernan, and Morgen Larsen have produced Injustice at Home: the Japanese American experience of the World War II Era.

This educational resource--five educational videos and an inquiry-based unit of study--will help students understand Executive Order 9066 and the resulting internment of Japanese-Americans during World War II, the failure of political leadership to protect constitutional rights, the military experience of Japanese-Americans during WWII, and examples of discrimination and racial prejudice the Japanese-American community faced before, during and after WWII.

In addition, students will analyze the short and long term emotional effects on those who are incarcerated, identify the challenges that people living outside of the exclusion zone faced, examine how some Japanese Americans showed their loyalty during the period of incarceration, and learn about brave individuals who stood up for Japanese Americans during this time.

Subject:
U.S. History
Political Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Unit of Study
Author:
KSPS Public Television
Leslie Heffernan
Morgen Larsen
Starla Fey
Date Added:
03/01/2019
Resettling In Washington
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

Students begin this unit by exploring the themes of humanity and community as they discuss  the many factors that influence the development of personal identities. They unpack together how we show versus hide different parts of ourselves, and how our identities can be both fixed and ever-changing. Then, students listen to oral histories by Vietnamese Americans in Washington to learn how displacement and resettlement have impacted them personally and shaped their outlook on helping others. Using evidence from these firsthand accounts, students answer the question: What can the experiences of displaced people teach us about community, resilience, and humanity? Throughout this unit, students work in teams to create a podcast where they reflect on their collective responsibility to stand in solidarity with displaced people.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Module
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Author:
Educurious .
Date Added:
06/22/2022