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World Myths & Legends in Art
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World Myths & Legends in Art

Primarily for teachers and students (but fun for anyone), this website from ... (more)

Primarily for teachers and students (but fun for anyone), this website from the Minneapolis Institute of Arts uses 26 works of art selected from its collections to explore mythology from around the world. Each work of art has a corresponding essay that includes key points; the story that inspired the work of art; background, such as history, cultural context and style; and suggested discussion questions. For example, the entry for a Navajo ketoh includes a Navajo creation myth describing the adventures of the earliest beings as they moved through the first four worlds; explains that while this particular piece is decorative jewelry, the ketoh form is based on wrist guards worn by archers to protect their forearms from the snap of their bowstrings; and also provides background information on the Navajo, and their arts and crafts. (less)

Subject:
Social Sciences
Education
Provider:
Internet Scout Project
Provider Set:
Internet Scout Project
As the Tate Modern prepares to open a Damien Hirst retrospective, critics and others offer comment
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As the Tate Modern prepares to open a Damien Hirst retrospective, critics and others offer comment

Damien Hirst retrospective: Is nothing sacred?http://www.economist.com/node/21550767'Damien Hirst should not be in the ... (more)

Damien Hirst retrospective: Is nothing sacred?http://www.economist.com/node/21550767'Damien Hirst should not be in the Tate' says critichttp://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/art/9168804/Damien-Hirst-should-not-be-in-the-Tate-says-critic.htmlDamien Hirsts are the sub-prime of the art worldhttp://www.independent.co.uk/opinion/commentators/julian-spalding-damien-hirsts-are-the-subprime-of-the-art-world-7586386.htmlDamien Hirst on death, drink and diamondshttp://www.thisislondon.co.uk/arts/visual-arts/damien-hirst-on-death-drink-and-diamonds-7581167.htmlDamien Hirst's Live Stream: Not So Very Livelyhttp://blogs.wsj.com/speakeasy/2012/03/26/damien-hirsts-live-stream-not-so-very-lively/Damien Hirsthttp://www.damienhirst.com/Damien Hirst is a lighting rod of controversy in the modern art world, and while some art critics find his work insufferable, his work commands a king's ransom in the marketplace. Perhaps his most well-known work is "The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living," or a tiger shark immersed in formaldehyde. This week, Hirst entered the headlines again (and perhaps he never left) as The Economist and other publications began to comment on a major retrospective of his work prepared to open at the Tate Modern in London on April 4th. Interestingly enough, several of the works in the exhibit were loaned for the show by Hirst himself, who is known for being a savvy investor in his own work. The criticisms have already started, as art critic Julian Spalding commented in the Telegraph that "Hirst should not be in the Tate. He's not an artist. What separates Michelangelo from Hirst is that Michelangelo was an artist and Hirst isn't." This is not an unfamiliar charge against Hirst and his work, and it will be interesting to see how visitors and others in the art world respond to this major show. The first link will take visitors to a short review of the new Hirst show, courtesy of last week's Economist. The second link will take interested parties to a piece from Tuesday's Telegraph which contains commentary from art critic Julian Spalding on Hirst's work. The third link will whisk users away to a more detailed and elaborate piece from Spalding which urges those who own works by Hirst to sell them as soon as possible. Moving along, the fourth link leads to an interview with Hirst in which he comments on Francis Bacon, psychology, and the importance of art history. The fifth link leads to a review from the Wall Street Journal's "Speakeasy" blog of Hirst's new live streaming art studio feed. Finally, visitors can check out the feed themselves via the last link, which leads to the official homepage of the Damien Hirst studio. (less)

Subject:
Social Sciences
Education
Provider:
Internet Scout Project
Provider Set:
Internet Scout Project
Author:
Grinnell, Max
Concerned about the education of young people, the Common Core organization releases the results of a recent survey
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Concerned about the education of young people, the Common Core organization releases the results of a recent survey

History Surveys Stumps U.S. Teens [Free registration may be required]http://www.nytimes.com/2008/02/26/education/27history.html?_r=1&oref=sloginThe New Dictionary ... (more)

History Surveys Stumps U.S. Teens [Free registration may be required]http://www.nytimes.com/2008/02/26/education/27history.html?_r=1&oref=sloginThe New Dictionary of Cultural Literacyhttp://www.bartleby.com/59/Bill Moyers Journal: Interview with Susan Jacobyhttp://www.pbs.org/moyers/journal/02152008/watch2.htmlDigital Historyhttp://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/19th Century Textbookshttp://digital.library.pitt.edu/nietz/Debates over what young people should be taught in schools have raged on since the time of ancient Greece. From the rise of compulsory elementary education to the creation of the elective system at Harvard in the 19th century, some critics have maintained that such changes have had a rather deleterious effect on young minds. A recently released survey from the Common Core organization adds fire to the already raging conflagration surrounding such matters. The survey asked 1,200 17-year olds to answer 33 multiple-choice questions about history and literature. The results were not terribly promising, as about a quarter of the teenagers surveyed could not correctly identify Adolf Hitler as Germany's chancellor during World War II. Other findings noted that one-quarter of the respondents thought that Christopher Columbus sailed to the New World sometime after 1750. Leaders of the Common Core group also argue that the No Child Left Behind law has effectively created a desolate landscape throughout America's public school curriculum, and they suggest that young people would benefit from a more comprehensive liberal arts and science education. In the introduction to their final report on the survey, the authors noted, "The nation's education system has become obsessed with testing and basic skills because of the requirements of federal law, and that is not healthy." The first link will lead users to a piece by Greg Toppo of USA Today that offers a bit of background on this thorny issue, complete with an interesting quiz and a section for comments. The second link will take readers to a news article from this Tuesday's New York Times which discusses the findings of this survey conducted by the Common Core organization. Moving on, the third link leads to the online version of The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy which includes 6,900 entries. As the site notes, this work "forms the touchstone of what it means to be not only just a literate American but an active citizen in our multicultural democracy." The fourth link will whisk users away to an interesting interview with Susan Jacoby, who has recently written a book that examines the current "overarching crisis of memory and knowledge." The fifth link leads to the very fine Digital History site, which contains hundreds of resources for history teachers and students that are both well developed and engaging. Those persons looking for a bit of the "old-time" education will appreciate the sixth and final site. Here, visitors can look over 140 19th century schoolbooks digitized by the staff at the University of Pittsburgh's Digital Research Library. (less)

Subject:
History, Law, Politics
Social Sciences
Education
Provider:
Internet Scout Project
Provider Set:
Internet Scout Project
Living Heritage
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Living Heritage

Living Heritage is a website that celebrates New Zealand heritage through the ... (more)

Living Heritage is a website that celebrates New Zealand heritage through the help of the schools and students of New Zealand. The "About Living Heritage" link states that the website is "an online bilingual initiative that enables New Zealand schools to develop and publish an online resource, based on a heritage treasure in their community." Visitors can also read about the five or so groups these stories "Benefit", including New Zealand and the World, in the About Living Heritage link. The "Schools' Stories" link takes visitors to 26 schools' websites produced since 2008, and an archive of 79 schools' websites produced before 2008. By browsing through the stories, visitors can learn about Paddy, the much-loved wandering Airedale who lived on Island Bay in Wellington in the 1930s. The story of Mitiaro High School in the Cook Islands describes how they learned how to build a canoe called a paiere. Finally, a group of Year 1 and 2 students at Russley School write about their discovery that a tree near their school is protected by the city council. (less)

Subject:
Social Sciences
Education
Provider:
Internet Scout Project
Provider Set:
Internet Scout Project
2002 llaF ,gnivloS melborP gnireenignE dna sretupmoC ot noitcudortnI

2002 llaF ,gnivloS melborP gnireenignE dna sretupmoC ot noitcudortnI

.desu si egaugnal gnimmargorp avaJ ehT .gninnalp dna ,tnemeganam ,ecneics ,gnireenigne ni ... (more)

.desu si egaugnal gnimmargorp avaJ ehT .gninnalp dna ,tnemeganam ,ecneics ,gnireenigne ni smelborp gnivlos rof seuqinhcet gnipoleved no si sisahpmE .scipot decnavda detceles dna scihparg retupmoc ,gnihcraes dna gnitros ,serutcurts atad ,sdohtem laciremun ,secafretni resu lacihparg ,stpecnoc gnimmargorp revoc smelborp gnimmargorp ylkeeW .esruoc eht fo sucof eht si tnempoleved dna ngised erawtfos detneiro-tcejbO .snoitacilppa cifitneics dna gnireenigne rof sdohtem lanoitatupmoc dna tnempoleved erawtfos latnemadnuf stneserp esruoc sihT (less)