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Border Walls
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This inquiry examines the 20th century history of migration from Mexico to the United States and recent efforts to limit the movement of people across the southern U.S. border. The inquiry takes its inspiration from a 2018 podcast episode by Malcom Gladwell titled, “General Chapman’s Last Stand.” The podcast is part of Gladwell’s Revisionist History series (http://revisionisthistory.com). In the podcast, Gladwell tells the story of General Leonard F. Chapman Jr., Commandant of the Marine Corps during the Vietnam War, who went on to serve as the Commissioner of the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) from 1972 to 1975. Chapman is credited with reforming the INS into a more efficient and effective agency, but Gladwell argues that Chapman’s efforts also led to an unintentional increase in unauthorized immigrants. In 1970, 760,000 Mexican immigrants, or 1.4% of Mexico’s population, lived in the U.S. By 2008, there were 12.7 million Mexican immigrants in the U.S. which amounted to 11% of all people born in Mexico; an increase of almost 800% in less than 30 years. The question of how and why this happened is the central focus of this inquiry.

Subject:
U.S. History
Social Science
Political Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
C3 Teachers
Date Added:
03/11/2019
French Revolution
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This tenth grade annotated inquiry leads students through an investigation of the French Revolution. Adolescent students are quite concerned with challenging authority and establishing their independence within the world; the concept of revolution brings those two concerns to their most world-altering levels. This inquiry gives students an entry point into thinking like historians about the French Revolution. The question of success invites students into the intellectual space that historians occupy. By investigating the question of the French Revolution’s success, students will need to make decisions about what the problems of the Revolution were, how to give weight to the events of three different periods of the Revolution, and what distance, if any, was between intentions and effects.

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Lesson
Primary Source
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
C3 Teachers
Author:
New York State Department of Education
Date Added:
06/23/2017
Grade 8 - Differentiate between Fact and Assumption
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Compelling Question: How can words lead to conflict?

This inquiry provides students with the opportunity to analyze, through the evaluation of words, how conflicts between the U.S. government and Native American tribes arose. Students will be asked to investigate federal reports, speeches, and news reports to discern U.S. leaders’ perspectives and compare these biases to the words of Native American leaders Chief Red Eagle and Chief Tecumseh. This query is meant to challenge students to analyze the meaning of words and evaluate how these words said can cause conflict through three events: Andrew Jackson’s involvement in the War of 1812 and his presidency, the Sioux Ghost Dance, and Georgia v. Worcester. Students must also be able to think critically from Native American Chiefs’ perspectives to be able to accurately comprehend the power behind the U.S.’s conflicting words. The final summative assessment asks students to write an argument using evidence and a counterargument addressing how words lead to conflict.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
C3 Teachers
Author:
Cynthia Yurosko
Evergreen Public Schools
Date Added:
08/17/2018
Needs and Wants
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This annotated kindergarten inquiry focuses on the economics concept of scarcity by developing an understanding of needs and wants and goods and services through the compelling question, “Can we ever get everything we need and want?” The distinctions between these constructs serve as the necessary components of an examination of the choices people must make when faced with potential limitations.

Subject:
Elementary Education
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
C3 Teachers
Date Added:
07/10/2017
Uncle Tom’s Cabin
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This seventh grade annotated inquiry provides students with an opportunity to explore how words affect public opinion through an examination of Harriet Beecher Stowe’s novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin. Students will investigate historical sources related to the novel and reactions in the North and South in order to address the compelling question, “Can words lead to war?” This query takes advantage of the mixed messages students often receive about the power of words. Students’ understanding about how words can make a difference is often grounded in discussions of words used to bully, instead of the power of words to encourage reform. This is an ANNOTATED inquiry with additional information on the questions, tasks, and sources within.

Subject:
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
C3 Teachers
Date Added:
07/10/2017