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  • ASPIRE
Astrophysics Science and Technology Project: Integrating Research and Education (ASPIRE)
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The ASPIRE Lab is now one of the most innovative and interactive science education websites available on the Internet. You will find not only fun interactive labs, but well designed and produced curriculum content, created by teachers for teachers. The powerful combination of inquiry-based content, along with interactive, hands-on labs provides a powerful visualization tool for you and your students to use. Best of all, the ASPIRE Lab is free!

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
University of Utah
Provider Set:
ASPIRE
Date Added:
10/13/2005
Cosmic Zoom
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This visual representation is to help give you an idea of the size and scale of the universe. Each image is 10 times bigger or smaller than the one that comes before it or after it. The numbers are written using exponential notation. This is a convenient way scientists use to write very large or very small numbers. For example, how do you know what an exponential number really means? Let’s show you briefly how to figure it out.

Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
University of Utah
Provider Set:
ASPIRE
Date Added:
02/16/2011
In Search of Cosmic Rays
Conditions of Use:
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These interactive lessons teach about Cosmic Rays by emphasizing the mystery that Cosmic Rays presented to early scientists. The scientific inquiries and investigations that Cosmic Rays prompted are interesting and important to understanding the way science works. Cosmic Rays are now being studied at research sites around the world. Much has been learned from early experiments and even more is being discovered with modern experiments, but many questions have yet to be answered.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
University of Utah
Provider Set:
ASPIRE
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Kinetic Energy
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Most students will have an intuitive sense that kinetic energy depends on how fast something is moving (speed) and how massive it is (mass). (We use speed instead of velocity, because energy is a scalar, and independent of direction.) They know that it hurts more in dodge ball when the ball is thrown with more speed than when it is thrown with less speed. They also know that is hurts more to drop a bowling ball on their foot than it does to drop a tennis ball. Exactly how mass, speed and kinetic energy are related is the purpose of this lab. Which is more important in determining kinetic energy? mass or speed? or are they of the same importance?

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
University of Utah
Provider Set:
ASPIRE
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Lunar Phases
Conditions of Use:
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If you watch the moon every night, you see its shape appear to change. Does the moon really change shape? Of course not, but its appearance from Earth certainly changes. How does this work? The answer lies within the part of the moon that receives sunlight, and the part of the moon that does not receive sunlight.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
University of Utah
Provider Set:
ASPIRE
Date Added:
02/16/2011