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American Government
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Since the advent of civilization, humans have had an impulse to form governments. It is an experiment thousands of years in the making. This course asks a lot of fundamental questions about the nature of government and society. Among them: We do not answer these questions; that is up to you. Defining the role of government has been thousands of years in the making. Welcome to the laboratory of democracy.

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
ushistory.org
Date Added:
10/03/2016
American History: From Pre-Columbian to the New Millennium
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From Pre-Columbian to the New Millennium The word history comes from the Greek word historía which means "to learn or know by inquiry." In the pieces that follow, we encourage you to probe, dispute, dig deeper — inquire. History is not static. It's fluid. It changes and grows and becomes richer and more complex when any individual interacts with it. Knowledge of history is empowering. An event is but the furthest ripple of an ever-expanding wave that may have started eddying outward hundreds of years ago. One who "sees" history is able to harness the power of that wave's entire journey. Finally, the best history has at its foundation a story. A printer challenges a King and so is laid the foundation of the first amendment; a New Jersey miner finds gold in California and sets off a torrent of movement westward; a woman going home from work does not ...

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
ushistory.org
Date Added:
10/03/2016
Ancient Civilizations
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To borrow from Dr. Seuss's book title, "Oh the Places You'll Go! Here's a coming attraction of the people, places, ideas, and things coming at you: Your 3.2 million-year-old human ancestor Lucy, mummies, pyramids, Cleopatra, "an eye for an eye", the birth of major religions Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism, the birth of democracy, the first Olympics, Julius Caesar, gladiators, the invention of writing, paper, and the wheel, kingdoms built of stone in Africa, the Great Wall of China, the introduction of such concepts as zero, time, and monotheism (the belief in one god), Samurai, martial arts, palaces of gold, and even the Sphinx. Whew! The study of ancient civilizations and people raises some profound questions. Who are humans? Where did we come from? Where are we going? As you explore these civilizations, see if you can make sense of this Sphinxlike statement from author William Faulkner: "The past ...

Subject:
Ancient History
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
ushistory.org
Date Added:
10/03/2016