Search Resources

6 Results

View
Selected filters:
  • University of Washington
The Cold War and Red Scare in Washington State
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

The most important part of this packet is Section VII, which contains roughly 50 documents—mostly drawn from primary sources—about the Cold War and Red Scare in Washington state. The other sections of this packet seek to place the documents in historical perspective and to offer some suggestions for how to use the documents in the classroom.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Textbook
Provider:
University of Washington
Provider Set:
Center for the Study of the Pacific Northwest
Date Added:
02/16/2011
From Colonialism to Tourism: Maps in American Culture
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

From the earliest days of settlement and migration, the people of North America have relied on maps and mapping to understand their environment and place within it. Maps have helped Americans prospect investments, comprehend war, and plan leisure in places unknown. As Americans have used maps to explore the U.S., capitalize on its resources, and displace its Native peoples, maps have shaped American cultural ideas about travel, place, and ownership. This exhibit explores the cultural and historic impact of mapping through four specific moments in American history: migration along the Oregon Trail, the rise of the lumber industry, the Civil War, and the popularization of the automobile and individual tourism. It concludes with a look at maps in the age of computers, the Internet, and beyond. These moments demonstrate the influence maps have had over how Americans imagine, exploit, and interact with national geographies and local places. This exhibition was created as part of the DPLA’s Digital Curation Program by the following students in Professor Helene Williams's capstone course at the Information School at the University of Washington: Greg Bem, Kili Bergau, Emily Felt, and Jessica Blanchard. Additional revisions and selections made by Greg Bem.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
University of Washington
Provider Set:
DPLA Exhibitions
Author:
Emily Felt
Greg Bem
Jessica Blanchard
Kili Bergau
Date Added:
09/01/2014
Golden Age of Radio in the US
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Tuning into the radio is now an integrated part of our everyday lives. We tune in while we drive, while we work, while we cook in our kitchens. Just 100 years ago, it was a novelty to turn on a radio. The radio emerged at the turn of the twentieth century, the result of decades of scientific experimentation with the theory that information could be transmitted over long distances. Radio as a medium reached its peak—the so-called Radio Golden Age—during the Great Depression and World War II. This was a time when the world was rapidly changing, and for the first time Americans experienced those history-making events as they happened. The emergence and popularity of radio shifted not just the way Americans across the country experienced news and entertainment, but also the way they communicated. This exhibition explores the development, rise, and adaptation of the radio, and its impact on American culture.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
University of Washington
Provider Set:
DPLA Exhibitions
Author:
Hillary Brady
Date Added:
05/01/2014
A History of Treaties and Reservations on the Olympic Peninsula, 1855-1898
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

The curriculum materials in this packet are intended to provide middle- and high-school teachers with the background and basic tools they need to develop and incorporate lessons about Indian-white relations in Washington into existing lessons about the history of the United States and Washington. This packet focuses on the treaty negotiations and the establishment of reservations on the Olympic Peninsula that took place in the last half of the 19th century, but it also provides a broad overview of how relations between Indian nations and the United States government evolved in the first hundred years of the nation's history.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Political Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
University of Washington
Provider Set:
Center for the Study of the Pacific Northwest
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Open Data Kit
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Open Data Kit (ODK) is an open-source suite of tools that helps organizations author, field, and manage mobile data collection solutions. Our goals are to make open-source and standards-based tools which are easy to try, easy to use, easy to modify and easy to scale. To this end, we are proud members of the OpenRosa Consortium and active participants in the JavaRosa project.

ODK's core developers are researchers at the University of Washington's Department of Computer Science and Engineering department and active members of Change, a multi-disciplinary group at UW exploring how technology can improve the lives of under-served populations around the world.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
University of Washington
Date Added:
04/25/2013
Race to the Moon
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

After World War II, there was non-violent, political hostility between the United States and the Soviet Union (USSR), which became known as the Cold War. During this contentious time, both nations created rockets for long-range military weaponry. The Cold War catalyzed the expansion of rocket technology and each country’s desire to conquer outer space. Not only did America want to explore one of the last frontiers, it also wanted to claim technological dominance over the USSR and ensure America’s title of superiority in a time of unease and tension. In 1955, the US and the USSR each announced plans to launch a satellite into orbit. Who would be the first to succeed? On October 4, 1957, the USSR launched Sputnik I into orbit, taking the lead in the Space Race. Only four months later, the US successfully launched its own satellite, the Explorer I, into space. In the wake of these first successful orbital space flights, President Dwight D. Eisenhower recommended to the US Congress that a civilian agency should be established to direct non-military space activities. Thus, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) was born and the Space Race was underway. Throughout the 1960s and 1970s, the American space program and its new classes of astronauts achieved breakthroughs in science and space exploration—even sending a man to the Moon. This exhibition was created as part of the DPLA’s Digital Curation Program by the following students in Professor Helene Williams's capstone course at the Information School at the University of Washington: Danielle Rios, Dianne Bohach, Jennifer Lam, and Bobbi deMontigny.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
University of Washington
Provider Set:
DPLA Exhibitions
Author:
Bobbi deMontigny
Danielle Rios
Dianne Bohach
Jennifer Lam
Date Added:
10/01/2015