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Advanced Keyword Searching, Part II
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The purpose of this tutorial (along with the “Advanced Keyword Searching, Part I” tutorial) is to help the student master comprehensive, keyword searching. Performing a truly comprehensive, keyword search is more difficult than performing a similarly thorough, subject heading search. We hope that this tutorial will make the steps involved in this complex process easier to understand and master.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
University of Nebraska
Author:
Cindy Schmidt
Date Added:
08/03/2021
Building an American Identity: An Ongoing Story 1493-1865
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The identity of a country is vast. It lies within all the values of its people. There are hundreds of ideals that America has chosen to base its country around. The values that the United States chose to focus on were very important to shaping the way people saw the nation and the way the people saw themselves. It remains important to this day for the people to make sure their values are correct. We will go through a couple of the most important values that America is built upon and we’ll hit on some others in our pieces of literature. This identity is still being built and modified to this day so this topic can certainly be looked throughout the entire time period in question.

Subject:
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
University of Nebraska
Author:
banderson1844
Date Added:
05/07/2020
The Confessions of Nat Turner (1831)
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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Nat Turner (1800–1831) was known to his local “fellow servants” in Southampton County as “The Prophet.” On the evening of Sunday, August 21, 1831, he met six associates in the woods at Cabin Pond, and about 2:00 a.m. they began to enter local houses and kill the white inhabitants. Over the next 36 hours, they were joined by as many as 60 other slaves and free blacks, and they killed at least 10 men, 14 women, and 31 infants and children. By noon of Tuesday, August 23, the insurgents had been killed, captured, or dispersed by local militia. Nat Turner alone escaped—until October 30, when he was caught in the immediate vicinity, having used several hiding places over the previous 9½ weeks. The next day he was delivered to the county sheriff and lodged in the county jail in Jerusalem (now Courtland), Virginia. There, from November 1 through November 3, he was interviewed by Thomas Ruffin Gray, a 31-year-old lawyer who had previously represented several other defendants charged in the uprising. Gray had witnessed the aftermath of the killings, interviewed other participants, and survivors, and had supplied written accounts to various newspapers. He was familiar with the outlines of Nat Turner’s life and the plot, and he was aware of the intense interest and the commercial possibilities of its originator’s narrative.

In the Confessions, Nat Turner appears more a fanatic than a practical liberator. He tells of being spoken to by the Holy Spirit, of seeing visions and signs in the heavens—”that I was ordained for some great purpose in the hands of the Almighty.” In Gray’s view, “He is a complete fanatic, or plays his part most admirably.”

On November 5th, Nat Turner was tried and condemned to be executed; on November 9th, he was hanged. On November 10th, Gray registered his copyright for the Confessions, in Washington, D.C. Within a week his pamphlet appeared, and it is estimated over 50,000 copies were sold in the next few months.

This electronic online edition is based on the first edition, published at Baltimore, MD, in November 1831.

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Reading
Provider:
University of Nebraska
Provider Set:
University of Nebraska Digital Commons
Date Added:
10/12/2016
Final Anthology
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This anthology was compiled with the express intention of re-writing motherhood and women back into historical literature anthologies. Since the study of history and literature have often been combined, both have become richer fields of study in the process, offering greater yields for each in the context of the other. Both, however, have had a long history of marginalizing female voices, particularly female voices of color. Though many modern anthologies have attempted to increase inclusivity, adding a wider diversity of voices with varying levels of success, this brief anthology is a devotion to American works written by women before 1865 with a specific focus on rectifying one of the frequently ignored elements of history and literature: motherhood.

Subject:
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
University of Nebraska
Author:
58865726a
Date Added:
05/07/2020
An Introduction to Anthropology: the Biological and Cultural Evolution of Humans
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
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This book was created as a means to provide an Open Educational Resource (OER) for University of Nebraska-Lincoln students enrolled in ANTH 110: Introduction to Anthropology. The book was inspired by the OERs Perspectives: An Open Introduction to Cultural Anthropology, 2nd edition, created by the Society for Anthropology in Community Colleges. Inspiration also comes from Dr. Michael Wesch and his OER text, The Art of Being Human: An Invitation to Anthropology. This book combines the authors’ respective specializations in forensic, archaeological, and cultural/medical anthropology, as well as uses examples from our research and lives. Funding for this work was provided by the Open Educational Resource Seed Grant from the Center for Transformative Teaching at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Subject:
Anthropology
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
University of Nebraska
Author:
Bill Belcher
LuAnn Wandsnider
Phil Geib
Taylor Livingston
Date Added:
04/01/2021