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The Lessons of 1704
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In The Lessons of 1704, students learn the basic skills needed to ...

In The Lessons of 1704, students learn the basic skills needed to do research and to "read" primary and secondary sources, to see what they can reveal about the cultural characteristics and attitudes of the English, French, and Native Americans in the Deerfield area in the late 17th and early 18th centuries. At the same time, they learn about the attitudes and behaviors of these three groups toward one another. Then, they use what they have learned to analyze the 1704 attack on Deerfield and the various events that led up to it. Their study of cultures and attitudes not only helps them understand how Queen Anne's War affected the peoples of the Deerfield area, but also it helps them understand why conflicts happen and how they can escalate. The unit then leads students through an analysis of a wide variety of "accounts" of the attack, from contemporary writings, to an early 20th century movie, to late 20th century "action figures." These "accounts" all reflect a distinct point of view, which students learn to "read" and understand. Throughout, the unit encourages students to question motives and attitudes before reaching conclusions about the causes and effects of an important event in American history.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association
Author:
Charlene Galenski
Kathleen Klaes
Lynne Manring
Raid on Deerfield: the Many Stories of 1704
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After several classroom discussions on anti-slavery issues, students will study the "American ...

After several classroom discussions on anti-slavery issues, students will study the "American Anti-Slavery Almanac for 1838." The students will understand the importance and role of political cartoons during the anti-slavery movement. Students will observe and identify details in a political cartoon. Students will understand that there were people both in favor of and against slavery here in the North and how both sides are represented in the cartoon. Students will create their own anti-slavery cartoons.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association
Everyday Life in a New England Town
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In the The Turns of the Centuries: Everyday Life in a New ...

In the The Turns of the Centuries: Everyday Life in a New England Town, 1680-1920, students learn the basic skills needed to "read" primary and secondary sources, including a broad array of documents, maps, images, and buildings, to see what they can reveal about the characteristics of everyday life in Deerfield, MA over three century turns. At the same time, they learn the historical background of each era so that the source materials will be understood in the proper context. Then, they use what they have learned to analyze the ways the town has changed since its beginning. The unit progresses chronologically through the three century turns, covering the periods 1680-1720, 1780-1820, and 1880-1920. This unit is lengthy, encompassing 15 separate lessons, some of which have many parts. However, it is designed in such a way that smaller groups of lessons can easily be extracted and used independently. Use the lessons and accompanying materials to suit your teaching needs.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association
Author:
Bette Schmitt
Mary Gene Devlin
The Nile of New England
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What were the distinguishing characteristics of the people of the Deerfield and ...

What were the distinguishing characteristics of the people of the Deerfield and their relationship with the land as illustrated through changes in lifestyles, economy, and governance? This curriculum is a semester-long course and is comprised of three units:
1. The Colonial Period 1680 – 1720
2. The Federal Period 1780-1820
3. The Progressive Era 1880-1920
Features of the Course:
• The course features an inquiry-based curriculum, based on constructivist learning theory.
• Students will learn to become historians, understanding the historical process by teasing out meaning through the use of historical evidence and conjecture.
• Students practice critical thinking skills.
• Students are actively involved at the center of their learning.
• Students are transcribing and analyzing primary documents.
• Technology integration is an integral part of the curriculum. Students are asked to use technology both as a tool for research and as a tool for creative presentations.
• Students are often assessed by using rubrics. The rubrics provide opportunities for students to self-evaluate their own work prior to submitting it for formal evaluation.
• Students are asked to participate in group work involving cooperative learning strategies.
• Students are continually being asked to write.
• Students have frequent practice using research skills.
• Students are expected to credit their sources of information.
• Students understand the importance of substantiating their statements with sources to corroborate their information/positions.
• Students are using organizational skills when presenting information.
• Students have an opportunity to creatively present their finished work.
• Students are graded using authentic assessments throughout the class.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association
Author:
Dr. Janice Dore
Susan McGowan
Research and Investigation Project: A Grave Undertaking
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The central focus of the Research and Investigation Project (RIP): A Grave ...

The central focus of the Research and Investigation Project (RIP): A Grave Undertaking unit is an exploration of the lives of individuals who lived in Deerfield from 1780-1880. Throughout their investigations of the past, students analyze a variety of primary and secondary sources and material culture to draw inferences about their research subjects, Deerfield's history, and the history of the country during this 100-year period. The five lessons in this unit take three to four weeks to complete. The specific time frame will depend on the length of time allotted for independent research and for the timeline activity. These are somewhat flexible activities, and can expand or contract depending on the teacher's interest, students' level of engagement, and the time available.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Visual Arts
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association
Author:
Howard Barnard
Robert Smith