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State of the Union Bingo 2012
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State of the Union Bingo is a tool designed to engage students ...

State of the Union Bingo is a tool designed to engage students in the President’s annual address to Congress. The lesson begins during the class prior to the address with the teacher providing background information about the State of the Union Address and examining the Constitutional requirement of the annual address. As a homework assignment, students are then each given a State of the Union Bingo card to use while watching the speech. The next class session, the cards are used as a discussion starter as well as a tool to analyze the President’s agenda for the coming year.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Game
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Constitution Center
Abraham Lincoln’s Crossroads
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Abraham Lincoln’s Crossroads is an educational game based on the traveling exhibition ...

Abraham Lincoln’s Crossroads is an educational game based on the traveling exhibition Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War, which debuted at the National Constitution Center in June 2005. The online game is intended for advanced middle- and high-school students. It invites them to learn about Lincoln’s leadership by exploring the political choices he made. An animated Lincoln introduces a situation, asks for advice and prompts players to decide the issue for themselves, before learning the actual outcome. At the end of the game, players discover how frequently they predicted Lincoln’s actions. A Resources Page keyed to each chapter provides links to relevant Websites on Lincoln and the Civil War, permitting students to explore issues in more depth

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Material Type:
Game
Provider:
National Constitution Center
Centuries of Citizenship: A Constitutional Timeline
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Centuries of Citizenship: A Constitutional Timeline is an interactive timeline of events ...

Centuries of Citizenship: A Constitutional Timeline is an interactive timeline of events marking more than 200 years of our constitutional history. These events tell the evolving story of our Constitution and the role it continues to play in our lives. See headlines, hear debates, explore maps and graphs.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Reading
Provider:
National Constitution Center
It's In Your Pocket
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The Articles of Confederation gave both the United States Congress and the ...

The Articles of Confederation gave both the United States Congress and the individual states the authority to issue money and regulate its value. The money issued in one state was of no value when the residents of that state traveled to another state. The Constitution set forth the powers of Congress. In Article 1, Section 8, Congress was given the sole power "To coin money, regulate the value thereof ..." Likewise, the Coinage Act of 1792 was signed into law by President George Washington on April 2, 1792. It provided for the establishment of the first mint in Philadelphia. Students will be able to: Learn how the federal government became responsible for the coining of money; Understand the significance of the symbols and mottoes on coins currently minted by the United States Mint; Discover what information all United States coins have in common.

Subject:
U.S. History
Law
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Constitution Center
A More Perfect Union
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This lesson is designed to show the process of perfecting the Union ...

This lesson is designed to show the process of perfecting the Union through changes made to the Constitution and through the powers delegated to each branch of government by the Constitution. The lesson encourages student deliberation on race in America by familiarizing students with Senator Obama's speech entitled, A More Perfect Union, his famous race speech, given at the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia in March 2008. Students are asked to read the speech for homework, guided by essential questions. In class, students work in groups to analyze parts of the Constitution, legislation and a Supreme Court opinion. They are then asked to consider them in regards to the progression of race relations in American history and Sen. Barack Obama’s call to perfect the union. The deliberation culminates with students creating an action plan detailing how they will play a part in perfecting the union

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Constitution Center
Seize the Vote!
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Test your knowledge of voting rights and gain the right to participate ...

Test your knowledge of voting rights and gain the right to participate in the ultimate act of citizenship for your characters!

Material Type:
Game
Provider:
National Constitution Center
To Sign or Not to Sign: The Ultimate Constitution Day Lesson Plan
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From the moment students enter the room, they will begin to examine ...

From the moment students enter the room, they will begin to examine and understand the role of the people in the Constitution. When students enter, they are asked to respond to a question posted at the front of the room. Students then watch a short video that gives a brief explanation of the Constitutional Convention of 1787, or listen as the transcript of the video is read aloud. Constitutions are provided so that in small groups, students can examine Article VII and rewrite it in their own words. The educator will then lead a discussion using the questions provided that examine the significance of signing the document and the even greater importance of Article VII, the revolutionary and powerful idea that it is the people who ultimately consent to the government framed by the Constitution. The importance of the amendment process, as a crucial element in keeping the document relevant, and one of the people, is highlighted in the remaining discussion questions. Websites containing primary sources from supporters of ratification and dissenters are provided for further reading, should you decide to use them.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Constitution Center