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Molecular Structure of 1-Azanaphthalene
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Most commonly called quinoline, this compound is naturally found in coal tar. It was first extracted in 1834 by German chemist F. Runge and is now used as a flavoring agent, preservative, disinfectant and solvent. It can also be used to make fungicides, dyes, rubber chemicals, and drugs (especially anti-malarial medicines). It is one of several compounds that add to the bitterness in coffee. Although it is safe in our food, it is highly toxic in its vapor form. If inhaled, acute exposure can irritate respiratory tract and cause headaches, nausea, or a coma.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Data Set
Interactive
Provider:
Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
Provider Set:
Reciprocal Net: A Distributed Crystallography Network for Researchers, Students, and the General Public
Author:
Common molecules
Other
Date Added:
06/23/2006
Molecular Structure of 3-Ethyl-2-hydroxy-4-methylcyclopent-2-en-1-one
Rating

3-Ethyl-2-hydroxy-4-methylcyclopent-2-en-1-one is a flavoring agent for maple and caramel odors. It is a fat soluble molecule that is found in tobacco smoke. Compared to other compounds that give food a caramel or maple odor, 3-Ethyl-2-hydroxy-4-methylcyclopent-2-en-1-one has a more burnt quality.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Data Set
Interactive
Provider:
Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
Provider Set:
Reciprocal Net: A Distributed Crystallography Network for Researchers, Students, and the General Public
Author:
Common molecules
Other
Date Added:
10/04/2006
Molecular Structure of 3-Ethyl-2-hydroxy-5-methylcyclopent-2-en-one
Rating

3-Ethyl-2-hydroxy-5-methylcyclopent-2-en-1-one is a molecule in the caramel and maple flavoring category that is described as more burnt. The odor is very strong, burnt, caramel and maple. It has only been accounted for in tobacco and tobacco smoke.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Data Set
Interactive
Provider:
Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
Provider Set:
Reciprocal Net: A Distributed Crystallography Network for Researchers, Students, and the General Public
Author:
Common molecules
Other
Date Added:
10/04/2006
Molecular Structure of Apatite
Rating

Apatite can be any of three different minerals depending on the predominance of fluorine, chlorine, or the hydroxyl group. It is typically green, and either transparent or translucent. It is prominently found and produced in Mexico, Ontario, Germany, Russia, USA, Sri Lanka and Brazil. Apatite can be cut into gemstones, although it is too soft and brittle to be highly durable. Its main use is as a source of phosphate for fertilizer. An interesting fact about the name "apatite" is that it is part of what makes up the teeth in all vertebrate animals.

Subject:
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Chemistry
Material Type:
Data Set
Interactive
Provider:
Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
Provider Set:
Reciprocal Net: A Distributed Crystallography Network for Researchers, Students, and the General Public
Author:
Common molecules
Obtained from the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database
Date Added:
08/14/2002
Molecular Structure of Aquamarine
Rating

Aquamarine originated in the 1820s from a Latin term aqua marina which means sea water. This popular gem has been by Indians as a good luck charm. Legend has it that the gem was a treasure of mermaids. Aquamarine is found in Brazil and the African countries of Tanzania, Kenya and Nigeria, the island of Sri Lanka, Afghanistan and Russia. Aquamarine is usually heat treated to remove the yellow components to make it bluer. Aquamarine has even been thought to help cure headaches, insomnia and other such ailments. This gem is given on the 19th wedding anniversary as a sign of love.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Data Set
Interactive
Provider:
Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
Provider Set:
Reciprocal Net: A Distributed Crystallography Network for Researchers, Students, and the General Public
Author:
Common molecules
Obtained from the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database
Date Added:
08/14/2002
Molecular Structure of Azurite
Rating

Azurite is a monoclinic blue crystal whose name is derived from the Arabic word, azure meaning blue. During the fifteenth and seventeenth centuries azurite was used as a blue paint pigment, but this pigment changes to green over time. This occurs because azurite reacts with water to produce malachite, which is green. Today this mineral is still used as a pigment, and as a minor ore of copper, an ornamental stone, and in jewelry. Azurite is found in many places but has notable occurrences in Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, and Morocco.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Data Set
Interactive
Provider:
Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
Provider Set:
Reciprocal Net: A Distributed Crystallography Network for Researchers, Students, and the General Public
Author:
Common molecules
Obtained from the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database
Date Added:
03/26/2003
Molecular Structure of BHA
Rating

BHA is a phenolic mixture of isomers used as a food additive in butter, meats, chewing gum, potatoes, beer, and also in other manufactured goods such as cosmetics, rubber, and petroleum based products as well as others. As an antioxidant, BHA reacts preferentially with oxygen rather than allowing the oxidation of the fats and oils already present, thereby protecting the product from breaking down and spoiling. This fat-soluble preservative has a white to yellowish color as a waxy solid with a faint aromatic odor. Some studies have shown that there are individuals that experience difficulty in metabolizing BHA which can cause changes in behavior and health. Medically this compound has shown some antiviral and antimicrobial activity and may be of use in the treatment of herpes simplex and AIDS.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Data Set
Interactive
Provider:
Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
Provider Set:
Reciprocal Net: A Distributed Crystallography Network for Researchers, Students, and the General Public
Author:
Common molecules
Obtained courtesy of the Cambridge Structural Database
Date Added:
10/11/2006
Molecular Structure of Blattellaquinone
Rating

This pheromone was identified and synthesized by the Roelof group in the Department of Entomology, Cornell University, in 2005. It is produced in the sex-pheromone producing glands of the female German cockroach (blattela germanica). In the future it might find application in trapping cockroaches as they are worldwide the most common residential and food-associated pests.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Data Set
Interactive
Provider:
Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
Provider Set:
Reciprocal Net: A Distributed Crystallography Network for Researchers, Students, and the General Public
Author:
Common molecules
Other
Date Added:
05/01/2006
Molecular Structure of Caramel Furanone
Rating

This is a powerful aromatic compound commonly called “caramel furanone” because it smells like maple syrup and Fenugreek. It is hypothesized that Sotolon is formed from α-ketobutyric acid and acetaldehyde. It is responsible for the sweet, caramel flavor in coffee and is a main contributor to white wine rancidity. It can be found in liquid whey, sugar, some tobacco, and a variety of wines. Sotolon’s spicy aroma is highly potent and has an odor detection threshold of 0.001 ppb.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Data Set
Interactive
Provider:
Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
Provider Set:
Reciprocal Net: A Distributed Crystallography Network for Researchers, Students, and the General Public
Author:
Common molecules
Other
Date Added:
10/02/2006
Molecular Structure of Cavansite
Rating

Cavansite was first described in 1968, and is a rare brilliant ocean blue mineral associated with blue zeolites. It is only found in a few locations and the best crystals are found in Poona, India's zeolite quarries. Due to its rarity and color this mineral has recently become very popular. However, thus far, it has only been used as mineral specimen.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Data Set
Interactive
Provider:
Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
Provider Set:
Reciprocal Net: A Distributed Crystallography Network for Researchers, Students, and the General Public
Author:
Common molecules
Obtained from the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database
Date Added:
04/25/2003
Molecular Structure of Cetyl alcohol
Rating

Cetyl alcohol is a nonionic surfactant as a hair coating in shampoos and conditioners. This is a fatty alcohol that is derived from natural fats and oils and is used as an emulsifier and emollient in skin moisturizing cosmetics. This white, crystalline, solid is insoluble in water and is often used as a lubricant for nuts and bolts. Cetyl alcohol has also been used in detergents, as a filler in plasticizers, an insulator, and as a thickener in creams and lotions. Extreme exposure to this substance has been found to cause irritation of the skin, eyes, and respiratory systems.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Data Set
Interactive
Provider:
Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
Provider Set:
Reciprocal Net: A Distributed Crystallography Network for Researchers, Students, and the General Public
Author:
Common molecules
Obtained courtesy of the Cambridge Structural Database
Date Added:
10/18/2006
Molecular Structure of Chrysoberyl
Rating

Alexandrite was found on the birthday of Czar Alexander in 1831 in the Soviet Union. Chrysoberyl can be found in granite and rocks. The name is derived from chryso , meaning gold, and beryl from the Greek word given to green gemstones. Chrysoberyl is mostly found in Brazil, Sri Lanka, Russia, Africa, and Malagasy Republic. The mineral chrysoberyl carries unique traits; it changes color depending on the light source. It is said to have some metaphysical properties, such as assisting one in eagerness for excellence. The gems are found in jewelry stores ranging in a variety of price. Once called Oriental Topaz , chrysoberyl was considered a precious gem in ancient times. It is characterized by its high stability, high specific gravity, and color.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Data Set
Interactive
Provider:
Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
Provider Set:
Reciprocal Net: A Distributed Crystallography Network for Researchers, Students, and the General Public
Author:
Common molecules
Obtained from the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database
Date Added:
08/14/2002
Molecular Structure of Coronol
Rating

Coronol, similar to Cyclotene, is a white to light brown solid, which tastes like burnt sugar or toffee. It is only used for flavoring and is found naturally in coffee and tobacco smoke. Coronol can be used to make a wide variety of flavors including coffee, brown sugar, caramel, roasted meats (chicken, pork or beef), and licorice.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Data Set
Interactive
Provider:
Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
Provider Set:
Reciprocal Net: A Distributed Crystallography Network for Researchers, Students, and the General Public
Author:
Common molecules
Other
Date Added:
09/20/2006
Molecular Structure of Corundum
Rating

Corundum or ruby is one of the oldest gems known to man. There is evidence of a Greek scholar, Theophastus, classifying precious stones such as rubies as early as 350 B.C. The first time Rubies were introduced in Europe was during the Greco-Roman times. Some of the best known producers of Corundum around the world are Southeast Asia, Australia, and southern Africa. In the U.S., it is found in North Carolina and Montana. Corundum is basically used as a gemstone for jewelry, but because of the high price scientists have made an inexpensive synthetic ruby. It is also used as an abrasive because of its hardness; it is employed industrially as a component of large machines to sandpaper.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Data Set
Interactive
Provider:
Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
Provider Set:
Reciprocal Net: A Distributed Crystallography Network for Researchers, Students, and the General Public
Author:
Common molecules
Obtained from the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database
Date Added:
08/14/2002
Molecular Structure of Crocoite
Rating

Crocoite is an orange-red mineral which is found mainly in Tasmania, Australia. However it was first discovered in the Urals Mountains of Russia in 1766. Shortly after, in 1832, it was given its name in reference to its color, from a Greek word meaning saffron. It is occasionally used as a paint additive or pigment, and is the only natural occurring chromate of industrial importance. It is very sought after by mineral collectors due to its rarity and unusual color.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Data Set
Interactive
Provider:
Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
Provider Set:
Reciprocal Net: A Distributed Crystallography Network for Researchers, Students, and the General Public
Author:
Common molecules
Obtained from the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database
Date Added:
05/07/2003
Molecular Structure of Cyclotene
Rating

This naturally occurring flavor chemical has a distinct maple quality. It is found in almost all roasted, sugar products and maple flavors. As a food additive, Cyclotene is a flavoring agent.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Data Set
Interactive
Provider:
Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
Provider Set:
Reciprocal Net: A Distributed Crystallography Network for Researchers, Students, and the General Public
Author:
Common molecules
Obtained courtesy of the Cambridge Structural Database
Date Added:
09/18/2006
Molecular Structure of Domeykite
Rating

Domeykite is a copper arsenide mineral with off-white, yellow-brown, or copper-brown to steel-gray color. Its metallic luster and odd color make it a very unusual ornamental stone. It is used as minor ore of copper and for ornamental purposes. It is cut, polished, and made into attractive cabochons (a gemstone which has been shaped and polished), clocks, bookends and carvings. Domeykite is generally found in several mines of Chile, Ontario, Canada, and in Michigan, USA.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Data Set
Interactive
Provider:
Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
Provider Set:
Reciprocal Net: A Distributed Crystallography Network for Researchers, Students, and the General Public
Author:
Common molecules
Obtained from the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database
Date Added:
05/08/2003
Molecular Structure of Epsomite
Rating

Epsomite, sometimes referred to as heptahydrite, is found all over the world including in places such as hot springs in Italy and in unusual salt deposits in South Africa. The color of this mineral is a white to pale shade of translucent green/pink. In addition, epsomite is used in the manufacture of cotton and silk, tanning leather, fertilizers, and explosives. Medicinally, it is used as a laxative.

Subject:
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Chemistry
Material Type:
Data Set
Interactive
Provider:
Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
Provider Set:
Reciprocal Net: A Distributed Crystallography Network for Researchers, Students, and the General Public
Author:
Common molecules
Obtained from the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database
Date Added:
08/27/2002
Molecular Structure of Erythrite
Rating

Erythrite, also known as cobalt bloom, is a weathering product of cobalt-containing minerals such as cobaltite. Erythrite has a deep red-purple to peach or pink-red color. It is a secondary oxidized cobalt mineral that froms in monoclinic crystals, in globular, and in earthy forms. It is used as a minor ore of cobalt and as mineral specimen. This mineral is found in some mines of Ontario, Morocco, and Germany.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Data Set
Interactive
Provider:
Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
Provider Set:
Reciprocal Net: A Distributed Crystallography Network for Researchers, Students, and the General Public
Author:
Common molecules
Obtained from the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database
Date Added:
04/17/2003
Molecular Structure of Ethyl acetate
Rating

Ethyl acetate is a colorless, volatile liquid with a mild and fragrant odor. It is used as solvent in chemistry laboratories but can also be found in many household products such as paints, coatings, and adhesives. The compound is also used in some extraction processes such as decaffeination or purification of antibiotics. It is present in both nail polish and removers. Some synthetic fruit essences may contain this and other esters. Etymologists like to use this solvent for insect collecting as the vapor kill the insect quickly and keep it soft for mounting.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Data Set
Interactive
Provider:
Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
Provider Set:
Reciprocal Net: A Distributed Crystallography Network for Researchers, Students, and the General Public
Author:
Common molecules
Other
Date Added:
03/08/2006