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2 or 10 Day Armenian Genocide Lesson Plan
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The Two Day plan is intended to be completed in two fifty-minute class periods, with 2 homework assignments, the lesson includes the definition of genocide, historical background on the Armenian case, a review of other major genocides, a short national TV news piece, and readings from survivor testimonies.The Ten Day lesson includes film, primary documents, and the UN Declaration of Human RightsPart II, examines the economic developments of competing empires with subsequent loss of territory and rise of state repression over time. The final product is a colorful timeline linking seemingly disparate elements into a visible pattern. Students will also gain the opportunity to place the Armenian Genocide next to other acts of genocide and human rights abuses throughout history.Part III builds on the basic information learned in Part I and the larger historic and political overview gained in Part II. Students can participate in a mock re-enactment of the 1921 trial of Soghomon Tehlirian, who assassinated the mastermind of the Armenian Genocide and was later acquitted. The mock trial allows students to develop historical empathy with the victims and survivors of the Armenian Genocide.

Subject:
History
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Amit
Date Added:
06/11/2021
Echoes and Reflections: Teaching The Holocaust Through Inquiry
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CC BY-NC-SA
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These four lessons are provided by Echoes and Reflections. The lessons come from a new book, "Teaching the Holocaust By Inquiry" by Beth Krasemann. The book is scheduled for release at the end of May 2022.

Subject:
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Case Study
Author:
Amit
Date Added:
04/05/2022
Education and Home Life for Black Sharecroppers in Southern Maryland (1870s-1920s)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
4.0 stars

Consider the need for home education for Black and African-American families in Southern Maryland in the 1870s through 1920s, when public education was unavailable or inaccessible. This resource combines 3D models and 2D interaction to introduce students to Alphabet Wares/Alphabet Plates as found at Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum when excavating "Sukeek's Cabin," a late-19th century home by a newly-freed family on the park grounds. Themes include unjust limitations, archaeology as a primary source, and home life in the 1870s-1920s. The resource includes simple prompts and resources for hypothesizing about archaeological findings, researching them, drawing conclusions, and suggestions for further reflection.

This resource uses Genial.ly, an online-presentation service, with additional tools by S'CAPE to increase the interactivity. Public Genial.lys may be remixed into new presentations after signing up for an account with the service.

This resource is part of Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum’s open educational resources project to provide history, ecology, archaeology, and conservation resources related to our 560 acre public park. More of our content can be found on OER Commons, YouTube, and SketchFab. JPPM is a part of the Maryland Historical Trust under the Maryland Department of Planning.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
History
U.S. History
Social Science
Anthropology
Archaeology
Material Type:
Interactive
Provider:
Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum
Author:
JPPM Admin
Date Added:
04/18/2022
English Language Arts: Indigenous Peoples’ Day as an Act of Sovereignty Part 1
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CC BY-NC-ND
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Throughout the 20th and early 21st centuries tribal nations and Indigenous communities have continued to assert their right to self-governance and sovereignty despite numerous efforts to force them to assimilate. By extension, the purposeful erasure of Indigenous peoples as a living and thriving presence in the current, modern-day world also remains a reality.  Tribal sovereignty predates the existence of the U.S. government and the state of Oregon. Tribalgovernments are separate and unique sovereign nations with the power to execute their self-governance to protect the health, safety, and welfare of their citizens and to govern their lands, air, and waters. One of the ways Indigenous communities have been embodying their right to sovereignty is through the establishment of an Indigenous Peoples’ Day. Indigenous Peoples’ Day serves as a reminder of the contributions, both past and present, of Indigenous communities and tribal nations. In this lesson, students will explore the concepts of tribal sovereignty and self-determination and learn about efforts by tribes and other entities to promote and support the celebration of Indigenous Peoples’ Day. This lesson is meant to be used with its companion lesson: Indigenous Peoples’ Day as an Act of Sovereignty Part II.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Author:
Aujalee Moore
April Campbell
Date Added:
04/02/2021
Latinos in Oregon
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This unit provides an overview on the presence, influence, and stories of Oregon's Latino community. Your students will be given a chance to challenge thier skills as aspiring historians while celebrating and discovering my beautiful community.

Subject:
U.S. History
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Reading
Unit of Study
Author:
Victor Ochoa
Date Added:
07/02/2022
The New York Times and the Armenian Genocide
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A Lesson Plan based on The Armenian Genocide – News Accounts from the American Press, 1915-1922This curriculum extracts articles from the book, “The Armenian Genocide: News Accounts from the American Press,” compiled by Richard Kloian (available from GenEd and can be ordered for $25 by emailing). Including 200 New York Times articles, other journalistic accounts, U.S. Ambassador Morgenthau’s personal account of the genocide, survivor accounts, telegrams from the genocide perpetrator, photographs, and more, the book presents a compelling chronicle of the systematic deportations and massacres of the Armenians of the Ottoman Empire, perpetrated by the Turkish governing authorities between 1915 and 1922. The lesson allows students to:Discuss the significance of the language used in the articles as it relates to a modern definition of genocideComprehend the extent to which American readers/public were aware of the persecution against Armenians by Ottoman rulers.Understand the importance of media in exposing and preventing human rights abuses

Subject:
History
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Amit
Date Added:
06/12/2021
Oregon Territory & Native Genocide
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CC BY-NC
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The documents and questions may be used for classroom investigation or as a unit assessment. Documents can be distributed and assigned as a jigsaw or as a complete set. Students read the document and apply historical investigation skills. Students should have access to prior learning about the nature of Indian and white settler contact.Updated video link for Broken Treaties

Subject:
U.S. History
Social Science
Material Type:
Case Study
Author:
Amit
Date Added:
08/14/2022
Stages of Genocide
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The Stages of Genocide Toolkit contains six case studies of historical genocide:• Armenian Genocide• Genocide in Cambodia• Genocide in Guatemala• The Holocaust• Genocide of Native Americans in the United States• Genocide in RwandaThese specific case studies were chosen for their wide geographic range and their place in modern historical chronology. It is important to note that these genocides are not the only examples of genocide that one can find throughout history, nor do the authors of this toolkit consider them to be “worse” or more important than those that are not included in this toolkit. We believe strongly that there is no place for a “hierarchy of suffering” in genocide education. Additionally, these summaries are not meant to be comprehensive histories of each genocide. They were written to align with Dr. Gregory Stanton’s Ten Stages of Genocide and as such, there are many historical details that are not included in the summaries.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Amit
Date Added:
06/11/2021