Updating search results...

Search Resources

15 Results

View
Selected filters:
  • MCCRS.Math.Content.6.G.A.4
6.G Nets for Pyramids and Prisms
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

This is a task from the Illustrative Mathematics website that is one part of a complete illustration of the standard to which it is aligned. Each task has at least one solution and some commentary that addresses important aspects of the task and its potential use.

Subject:
Geometry
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Illustrative Mathematics
Provider Set:
Illustrative Mathematics
Author:
Illustrative Mathematics
Date Added:
08/06/2015
Christo's Building
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

This task is primarily about volume and surface area, although it also gives students an early look at converting between measurements in scale models and the real objects they correspond to.

Subject:
Mathematics
Geometry
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Illustrative Mathematics
Provider Set:
Illustrative Mathematics
Author:
Illustrative Mathematics
Date Added:
05/01/2012
City X Project
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

The City X Project is an international educational workshop for 8-12 year-old students that teaches creative problem solving using 3D printing technologies and the design process. This 6-10 hour workshop is designed for 3rd-6th grade classrooms but can be adapted to fit a variety of environments. Read a full overview of the experience here: http://www.cityxproject.com/workshop/

Subject:
Manufacturing
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Interactive
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
IDEAco
Author:
Brett Schilke
Libby Falck
Matthew Straub
Date Added:
04/04/2014
Designing: Candy Cartons
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
4.0 stars

This lesson unit is intended to help teachers assess how well students are able to: Select appropriate mathematical methods to use for an unstructured problem; interpret a problem situation, identifying constraints and variables, and specify assumptions; work with 2- and 3-dimensional shapes to solve a problem involving capacity and surface area; and communicate their reasoning clearly.

Subject:
Geometry
Material Type:
Assessment
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Shell Center for Mathematical Education
Provider Set:
Mathematics Assessment Project (MAP)
Date Added:
04/26/2013
Evaluating Statements About Length and Area
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

This lesson unit is intended to help teachers assess how well students can: Understand the concepts of length and area; use the concept of area in proving why two areas are or are not equal; and construct their own examples and counterexamples to help justify or refute conjectures.

Subject:
Geometry
Material Type:
Assessment
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Shell Center for Mathematical Education
Provider Set:
Mathematics Assessment Project (MAP)
Date Added:
04/26/2013
Grade 6 Module 5: Area, Surface Area, and Volume Problems
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

In this module, students utilize their previous experiences in order to understand and develop formulas for area, volume, and surface area.  Students use composition and decomposition to determine the area of triangles, quadrilaterals, and other polygons.  Extending skills from Module 3 where they used coordinates and absolute value to find distances between points on a coordinate plane, students determine distance, perimeter, and area on the coordinate plane in real-world contexts.  Next in the module comes real-life application of the volume formula where students extend the notion that volume is additive and find the volume of composite solid figures.  They apply volume formulas and use their previous experience with solving equations to find missing volumes and missing dimensions.  The final topic includes deconstructing the faces of solid figures to determine surface area.  To wrap up the module, students apply the surface area formula to real-life contexts and distinguish between the need to find surface area or volume within contextual situations.

Subject:
Geometry
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
01/31/2014
Laws of Arithmetic
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
4.0 stars

This lesson unit is intended to help you assess how well students are able to: Perform arithmetic operations, including those involving whole-number exponents, recognizing and applying the conventional order of operations; Write and evaluate numerical expressions from diagrammatic representations and be able to identify equivalent expressions; apply the distributive and commutative properties appropriately; and use the method for finding areas of compound rectangles.

Subject:
Geometry
Material Type:
Assessment
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Shell Center for Mathematical Education
Provider Set:
Mathematics Assessment Project (MAP)
Date Added:
04/26/2013
Math, Grade 6, Surface Area and Volume
Rating
0.0 stars

Surface Area and Volume

Type of Unit: Conceptual

Prior Knowledge

Students should be able to:

Identify rectangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and triangles and their bases and heights.
Identify cubes, rectangular prisms, and pyramids and their faces, edges, and vertices.
Understand that area of a 2-D figure is a measure of the figure's surface and that it is measured in square units.
Understand volume of a 3-D figure is a measure of the space the figure occupies and is measured in cubic units.

Lesson Flow

The unit begins with an exploratory lesson about the volumes of containers. Then in Lessons 2–5, students investigate areas of 2-D figures. To find the area of a parallelogram, students consider how it can be rearranged to form a rectangle. To find the area of a trapezoid, students think about how two copies of the trapezoid can be put together to form a parallelogram. To find the area of a triangle, students consider how two copies of the triangle can be put together to form a parallelogram. By sketching and analyzing several parallelograms, trapezoids, and triangles, students develop area formulas for these figures. Students then find areas of composite figures by decomposing them into familiar figures. In the last lesson on area, students estimate the area of an irregular figure by overlaying it with a grid. In Lesson 6, the focus shifts to 3-D figures. Students build rectangular prisms from unit cubes and develop a formula for finding the volume of any rectangular prism. In Lesson 7, students analyze and create nets for prisms. In Lesson 8, students compare a cube to a square pyramid with the same base and height as the cube. They consider the number of faces, edges, and vertices, as well as the surface area and volume. In Lesson 9, students use their knowledge of volume, area, and linear measurements to solve a packing problem.

Subject:
Mathematics
Geometry
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
Math, Grade 6, Surface Area and Volume, Diagrams & Problem Solving Strategies
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

Lesson OverviewStudents revise their packing plans based on teacher feedback and then take a quiz.Students will use their knowledge of volume, area, and linear measurements to solve problems. They will draw diagrams to help them solve a problem and track and review their choice of problem-solving strategies.Key ConceptsConcepts from previous lessons are integrated into this assessment task: finding the volume of rectangular prisms. Students apply their knowledge, review their work, and make revisions based on feedback from the teacher and their peers. This process creates a deeper understanding of the concepts.Goals and Learning ObjectivesApply your knowledge of the volume of rectangular prisms.Track and review your choice of strategy when problem-solving.

Subject:
Geometry
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
Math, Grade 6, Surface Area and Volume, Identifying Nets For Cubes
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

Lesson OverviewStudents explore nets—2-D patterns that can be folded to form 3-D figures. They start by examining several patterns and determining which nets form a cube. Then, they sketch nets for rectangular prisms. They also find the surface area of the rectangular prisms.ELL: Remind students of the units used to measure area and volume. Use this opportunity to reinforce why square units are used for area (2-D) and cubed units are used for volume (3-D).MathematicsA net is a 2-D pattern that can be folded to form a 3-D figure. In this lesson, the focus is on nets for rectangular prisms. There are many possible nets for any given prism. For example, there are 11 different nets for a cube, as shown below.The surface area of a prism is the area of its net.Goals and Learning ObjectivesIdentify nets for cubes.Sketch the net of a rectangular prism.Find the surface area of a rectangular prism.

Subject:
Geometry
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
Math, Grade 6, Surface Area and Volume, Transforming The Net of A Cube Into The Net of A Pyramid
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

Lesson OverviewStudents use scissors to transform a net for a unit cube into a net for a square pyramid. They then investigate how changing a figure from a cube to a square pyramid affects the number of faces, edges, and vertices and how it changes the surface area and volume.Key ConceptsA square pyramid is a 3-D figure with a square base and four triangular faces.In this lesson, the net for a cube is transformed into a net for a square pyramid. This requires cutting off one square completely and changing four others into isosceles triangles.It is easy to see that the surface area of the pyramid is less than the surface area of the cube, because part of the cube's surface is cut off to create the pyramid. Specifically, the surface area of the pyramid is 3 square units, and the surface area of the cube is 6 square units. Students will be able to see visually that the volume of the pyramid is less than that of the cube.Students consider the number of faces, vertices, and edges of the two figures. A face is a flat side of a figure. An edge is a segment where 2 faces meet. A vertex is the point where three or more faces meet. A cube has 6 faces, 8 vertices, and 12 edges. A square pyramid has 5 faces, 5 vertices, and 8 edges.Goals and Learning ObjectivesChange the net of a cube into the net of a pyramid.Find the surface area of the pyramid. 

Subject:
Geometry
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
Optimizing: Security Cameras
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
0.0 stars

This lesson unit is intended to help sixth grade teachers assess how well students are able to: Analyze a realistic situation mathematically; construct sight lines to decide which areas of a room are visible or hidden from a camera; find and compare areas of triangles and quadrilaterals; and calculate and compare percentages and/or fractions of areas.

Subject:
Geometry
Ratios and Proportions
Material Type:
Assessment
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Shell Center for Mathematical Education
Provider Set:
Mathematics Assessment Project (MAP)
Date Added:
04/26/2013
Scaling Cubes
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

In this activity, learners explore scale by using building cubes to see how changing the length, width, and height of a three-dimensional object affects its surface area and its volume. Learners build bigger and bigger cubes to understand these scaling relationships.

Subject:
Geometry
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Exploratorium
Author:
Exploratorium
Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation
National Science Foundation
The Exploratorium
Date Added:
12/07/2010