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  • MCCRS.ELA-Literacy.W.8.10
19th Century Women: Struggle and Triumph
Conditions of Use:
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Ever wonder what women were doing during the 1800s or what is known as the antebellum period of United States history? Men are well represented in our history books as they were the powerful, educated leaders of our country. Women, on the other hand, rarely had opportunities to tell their stories. Powerful stories of brave women who helped shape the history of the United States are revealed to students through journals, letters, narratives and other primary sources. Synthesizing information from the various sources, students write their impressions of women in the Northeast, Southeast, or the West during the Nineteenth Century.

Subject:
U.S. History
Women's Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
LOC Teachers
Date Added:
03/27/2007
African-American Identity in the Gilded Age
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Examine the tension experienced by African-Americans as they struggled to establish a vibrant and meaningful identity based on the promises of liberty and equality in the midst of a society that was ambivalent towards them and sought to impose an inferior definition upon them. The primary sources used are drawn from a time of great change that begins after Reconstruction's brief promise of full citizenship and ends with the First World War's Great Migration, when many African-Americans sought greater freedoms and opportunities by leaving the South for booming industrial cities elsewhere in the nation. The central question posed by these primary sources is how African-Americans were able to form a meaningful identity for themselves, reject the inferior images fastened upon them, and still maintain the strength to keep "from being torn asunder." Using the primary sources presented here, look for answers that bring your ideas together in ways that reflect the richness of the African-American experience.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World Cultures
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
LOC Teachers
Author:
Pat Adams-Caskie
Scott Culclasure
Date Added:
02/16/2011
The American Dream
Conditions of Use:
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Rating

This lesson invites students to search and sift through rare print documents, early motion pictures, photographs, and recorded sounds from The Library of Congress. Students experience the depth and breadth of the digital resources of the Library, tell the story of a decade, and help define the American Dream.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Performing Arts
Education
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
LOC Teachers
Date Added:
06/07/2000
Around the World in 1896
Conditions of Use:
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This is a lesson in which students take a trip around the world in 1896 using an online collection of 900 images. The collection includes photos of railroads, elephants, camels, horses, sleds and sleighs, sedan chairs, rickshaws, and other types of transportation, as well as city views, street and harbor scenes, landscapes, and people in North Africa, Asia, Australia, and Oceania.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
LOC Teachers
Date Added:
07/08/2003
Billy the Kid: Perspectives on an Outlaw
Conditions of Use:
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This lesson relates to the westward movement in the United States in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Students analyze the role that gunfighters played in the settlement of the West and distinguish between their factual and fictional accounts using American Life Histories: Manuscripts from the Federal Writers' Project, 1936 - 1940.Billy the Kid alias, William H. Bonney, alias Henry McCarty, alias Kid Antrim, etc. is an example of the typical gunfighter. He was born in the 1850s and died in 1881 when he was shot by Sheriff Pat Garrett. Billy serves as the focus of the lesson.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
LOC Teachers
Date Added:
07/28/2004
Civil War Photojournalism: A Record of War
Conditions of Use:
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Rating

This activity explores how and why war has been photographed and affords students an opportunity to see bias within war reporting. In addition to analyzing war photographs, students learn about Mathematics and Statisticsew Brady's process for photographing the Civil War and how photographic equipment has improved over time.

Subject:
Journalism
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
LOC Teachers
Date Added:
07/07/2000
Grade 8 Does Speech Matter Lesson 3 Speech Text (MDK12 Remix)
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This lesson spans multiple days and explores the value of debate teams in schools. During the first week of the unit, students learned to identify claims and warrants in texts. This week, students will build upon that knowledge by writing a basic argument and learning about the types of support that are used to build an argument. This will culminate with an assessment in which the students choose a position to take after reading a text and develop their claims and warrants with appropriate support and analysis.Cover image: "[Booker T. Washington, half-length portrait, seated]" by Frances Benjamin Johnston from the Prints & Photographs Onlince Catalog at loc.gov  

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Laura Knapp
The Great Depression in North Carolina: Experiences of the People
Conditions of Use:
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Rating

This lesson plan will result in imaginary Works Progress Administration (WPA) interviews similar to those found in American Life Histories, 1936-1940 of American Memory of the Library of Congress that demonstrate students' interpretation of the question, "Was the New Deal North Carolina's 'Reconstruction'?" All background knowledge on the Reconstruction era should have been completed prior to the introduction of this project.A written WPA report on an imaginary North Carolina resident who lived during the Reconstruction and Depression eras is the product of this assignment. Students must complete research of the American Life Histories, 1936-1940, select an occupation for future research, and explore additional print and electronic sources. The "interview" must be historically accurate, support a thesis that answers the question, and include an appropriate sensory illustration.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
LOC Teachers
Date Added:
07/07/2000
Indian Boarding Schools
Conditions of Use:
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In the late 1800s, the United States supported an educational experiment that the government hoped would change the traditions and customs of American Indians. Special boarding schools were created in locations all over the United States with the purpose of "civilizing" American Indian youth . Thousands of Native American children were sent far from their homes to live in these schools and learn the ways of white culture. Many struggled with loneliness and fear away from their tribal homes and familiar customs. Some lost their lives to the influenza, tuberculosis, and measles outbreaks that spread quickly through the schools. Others thrived despite the hardships, formed lifelong friendships, and preserved their Indian identities. Through photographs, letters, reports, interviews, and other primary documents, students explore the forced acculturation of American Indians through government-run boarding schools.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
LOC Teachers
Date Added:
04/09/2004
Labor Unions and Working Conditions: United We Stand
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This site provides primary source documents that students use to examine the working conditions of U.S. laborers at the turn of the century and to develop their own answers to a question: Was there a need for organized labor unions?

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
LOC Teachers
Date Added:
09/28/2004
Natural Disasters: Nature's Fury
Conditions of Use:
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Rating

This lesson invites students to read personal accounts of natural disasters in the U.S. during the late 1800s and early 1990s -- the great Chicago fire (1871), the Johnstown Flood (1889), the San Francisco earthquake and fire (1906), the Titanic (1912), the 1918 Flu Epidemics, the Dust Bowl (1930s-40s). Students research a disaster and create a presentation in which they assume the role of a witness to the event.

Subject:
U.S. History
Ecology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
LOC Teachers
Date Added:
06/01/2004
The U.S. Constitution: Continuity and Change in the Governing of the United States
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This lesson, a supplement to a study of the Constitutional Convention, focuses on The Committee of Detail's draft of the Constitution submitted on 6 August 1787. The delegates debated its contents for a month before referring the document to the Committee of Style. The Committee's report, presented to the Convention on 12 September, became the Constitution of the United States.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
LOC Teachers
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Waldseemüller's Map: World 1507
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

The 1507 World Map by Martin Waldseemüller is one of the world's most important maps. For the first time, this map labels America and shows the continent as a separate land mass. It is often referred to as America's Birth Certificate. Students will investigate this map by looking closely at the details of each section of the map and then draw conclusions on the revelation of this new and unusual world to the people of 1507.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
LOC Teachers
Date Added:
02/16/2011
War of Words lesson 3 Remix
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

 "Homeless," by Anna Quindlen, allows the student to understand homelessness as it affects many people on a broader scale. She emphasizes the individuality of homelessness, the fact that they not only lack possessions but have no place to keep them."The First" (also titled "Eviction") is a short poem by Lucille Clifton that provides the opportunity to compare and contrast the approach to the same issue through another genre.Final Assessment: How do Anna Quindlen and Lucille Clifton use language to convince the reader that their arguments have value? (focus on use of specific language, word choice, mood, tone, etc.)

Subject:
Literature
Education
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Jessica Wlotzka
What Do You See?
Conditions of Use:
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Rating

This is a lesson in which students analyze a single Civil War photograph and then find and analyze related images. The aim is to help students see relationships between the Civil War and American industrialization.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
LOC Teachers
Date Added:
07/07/2000