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  • MCCRS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.3c
Grade 11 ELA Module 4
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In this module, students read, discuss, and analyze literary texts, focusing on the authors’ choices in developing and relating textual elements such as character development, point of view, and central ideas while also considering how a text’s structure conveys meaning and creates aesthetic impact. Additionally, students learn and practice narrative writing techniques as they examine the techniques of the authors whose stories students analyze in the module.|

Subject:
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
11/13/2014
Grade 12 ELA Module 1
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Module 12.1 includes a shared focus on text analysis and narrative writing. Students read, discuss, and analyze two nonfiction personal narratives, focusing on how the authors use structure, style, and content to craft narratives that develop complex experiences, ideas, and descriptions of individuals. Throughout the module, students learn, practice, and apply narrative writing skills to produce a complete personal essay suitable for use in the college application process.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
10/22/2014
Grade 12 ELA Module 4
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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In this 12th grade module, students read, discuss, and analyze four literary texts, focusing on the development of interrelated central ideas within and across the texts. |The mains texts in this module include|A Streetcar Named Desire|by Tennessee Williams, “A Daily Joy to Be Alive” by Jimmy Santiago Baca, “The Overcoat” by Nikolai Gogol, and|The Namesake|by Jhumpa Lahiri. As students discuss these texts, they will analyze complex characters who struggle to define and shape their own identities. The characters’ struggles for identity revolve around various internal and external forces including: class, gender, politics, intersecting cultures, and family expectations.|

Subject:
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
07/14/2015
Teaching Hard History for Racial Healing Curriculum
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Using the C3 Inquiry Design Model format, high school social studies and English students learn to understand lynching in Virginia in the Jim Crow South and discuss ways of taking informed action to move towards racial healing. Each inquiry is supported by the Virginia Standards of Learning and the Common Core Standards and is expected to take three-four 50-minute class periods. The inquiry time frame can expand if teachers think their students need additional instructional experiences (e.g., historical context, formative performance tasks, featured sources, writing, etc.). Teachers are encouraged to adjust the inquiry to meet the needs and interests of their students and school/community contexts. The inquiries lend themselves to differentiation and modeling of historical thinking skills while assisting students in reading a wide variety of sources and writing in a wide variety of genres.Use the next button or the drop down menu to navigate between pages. Please note, Social studies lessons are found at the bottom of page 2 and English lesson are found at the bottom of page 3.  For more information and/or access to the primary sources used in the lesson plans, please visit the Racial Terror: Lynching in Virginia website.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
English Language Arts
Speaking and Listening
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Case Study
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Reading
Author:
JMU COE Curriculum Development Team
Nicole Wilson
Elaine Kaye
Date Added:
10/20/2021