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  • MCCRS.ELA-Literacy.SL.8.5
8th Grade Historical Literacy Unit Plans
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8th Grade Historical Literacy consists of two 43 minute class periods. Writing is one 43 minute block and reading is another. The teacher has picked themes based on social studies standards, and a read-aloud novel based on social studies serves as the mentor text for writing and reading skills. More social studies content is addressed in reading through teaching nonfiction reading skills and discussion.
Standards reflect CCSS ELA, Reading, and Social Studies Standards.

Subject:
English Language Arts
History
Material Type:
Full Course
Author:
Jennifer Mortensen
Chelsea Kienitz
Date Added:
04/16/2019
Digital Citizenship by J. Beck & T. Combs (41.WCS)
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Students explore multiple forms of digital etiquette and citizenship. They research current events based around digital concerns and innovations. Eventually, they apply that knowledge to their own lives and use of technology to develop 5 top guidelines for digital device usage for their peers. Students share their presentations and projects in an exhibit-style venue. Using a survey, students vote for their top choices, eventually selecting one choice to implement.Standards:CCSS English Language Arts (Grade 8)Ohio Standards for Technology 

Subject:
Educational Technology
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Cathryn Chellis
Introspective Representation by J. Beck (45.WCS)
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In this module, students are asked to explore artist representations inspired by how the “self” works in society. By exploring the elements of introspection through various art and media, students are asked to create a multimedia expression of who they are. Using their personality, likes, dislikes, values, and anything else that helps them identify, they create their own introspective representation. Standards:CCSS English Language Arts (Grade 8)Ohio Standards for Technology

Subject:
Educational Technology
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Blended Learning Teacher Practice Network
Date Added:
05/07/2018
Lived History: The Story of the Wind River Virtual Museum
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'Lived History' documents the making of the Wind River Virtual Museum, a high definition archive of Eastern Shoshone and Northern Arapaho ancestral artifacts. In the accompanying lesson plan (found in the Support Materials) students will learn from the time when Europeans first traveled in North America, they took collectors' interest in the arts, weaponry and attire of Native Americans. Sometimes they purchased artifacts, sometimes they stole them, and sometimes they killed for them. Over the years, pipes, war bonnets, cradle boards and parfleches accumulated in museums. The method of acquisition was often forgotten; exact historical documentation was often difficult. Many of the artifacts have perished or deteriorated over time. Many ancient artifacts remain in the vaults and display cases of museums far from their place of origin or the people who might best explain and appreciate them.

"Lived History" documents the creation of the 'Wind River Virtual Museum'—an archive of high definition images of ancestral artifacts created with guidance from Wind River tribal elders. Items like nineteenth century amulets, bags, drums, ceremonial headdresses and robes, everyday clothing, medicine related objects, hunting apparel, moccasins, and other meaningful objects were brought out of storage and displayed for the elders. Their commentary becomes part of the precarious and precious transmission of oral culture that the people of Wind River strive to honor and preserve, for future generations.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

Students will learn about different artifacts of the Shoshone and the Arapaho people and their significance/use.
Students will gain a deeper appreciation for the resiliency of people and the importance of cultural preservation.
Students will explore their own cultural identity and understand that culture is a system of beliefs, values, and assumptions about life that guide behavior and are shared by a group of people.
Students will name three objects identified in the Lived History video and gain an understanding of their uses and cultural significance.
Students will dentify some of the resources used to make traditional items and locate areas in which these resources are found.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Speaking and Listening
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Provider:
Wyoming PBS
Date Added:
09/17/2019
Preserving the Ways: Culture & Tradition
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Learn what the futures of the Eastern Shoshone and Northern Arapaho tribes are, and how the tribes will retain their culture and tradition while preparing to move into the future? In the accompanying lesson plan (found in the Support Materials) students will understand the importance of education and perservation of the culture.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

Students will demonstrate an understanding about the importance of education and preservation of the language and culture among the Northern Arapaho and Eastern Shoshone Tribe from the past, present, and future.
Students will learn about the Federal Indian Policy to civilize Native Americans through the establishment of Native American Boarding Schools incorporating key vocabulary words.
Students will learn about how the practice of forced assimilation contributed to the diminished use of the Shoshone and Arapaho people’s lifestyle, languages, and traditions.
Students will discuss the development of Indian boarding schools in the United States and Wyoming.
Students will analyze the differences between the early educational experiences of the Native American and non-native students.
Students will examine the importance of education as a value that the Shoshone, Arapaho, and non-native communities share.
Students will consider how Native American students and non-native students can learn from each other to dispel the myths and stereotypes that exist in contemporary society.
Students will learn why oral traditions are important.
Students will understand why respect for elders is important in the tribe.
Students will gain an awareness of why traditional dancing and singing is important to traditions and culture.
Students will explore the significance of the buffalo to the Shoshone people living on the Wind River Reservation.
Students will learn that through traditional concepts of understanding, the Shoshone people, as well as many other Plains tribes, were able to survive through their sustenance on the buffalo.
Students will discuss the relationship that Native American people have with the buffalo (i.e., spiritual, sustenance, etc.) and how oral traditions play a critical role in the preservation of Native ways of knowing.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Speaking and Listening
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Provider:
Wyoming PBS
Date Added:
09/17/2019
Solar System SciPack Meteorite and Comet Simulations
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This is a 30 minute lesson where students will be able to:
1. Describe the size, composition, and motion of meteors and comets.
2. Discuss the similarities and differences in comets and meteors.
3. Explain:
a. what happens to meteors as they fall through the atmosphere
b. why comet debris is observed as a meteor shower from the Earth
c. how the planet's gravitational forces affect a comet's orbit.
d. why we see a comet's tail.
e. why a comet disintegrates when it gets close to the sun.

Subject:
Applied Science
Physical Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Maggie Bly
Date Added:
06/20/2018
Students' Values & Communication by J. Beck & K. Smith (44.WCS)
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This module explores modern day apathy, specifically in middle schools. This PBL challenges students to be introspective and reflect onWhat they valueWhat they are concerned withWhat they are passionate aboutand then see how it can be changed.Students collaborate with oneother to discover shared ideas, research their value or issue, and develop a Public Service Announcement (PSA) to communicate what they want to improve. In a culminating activity, students participate in a gallery/exhibition to share their PSAs.Standards:CCSS English Language Arts (Grade 8)Ohio Standards for Technology 

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Cathryn Chellis
Washakie: Last Chief of the Eastern Shoshone
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Learn how the long life of Chief Washakie bridged a century of change in the American west—from the time of nomadic tribes following buffalo herds, to the period when tribes relinquished their claims to vast tracts of land in the West. That's when the Eastern Shoshone settled on the Wind River Indian Reservation. In the accompanying lesson plan (found in the Support Materials) students will understand the character traits of Chief Washakie.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

Students will write and deliver a speech pretending to be Chief Washakie talking to the people of the 21st Century.
Students will learn character traits and qualities and describe every individual and determine life choices for all.
Students will practice identifying “cause and effect” with historical events based on character qualities.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Speaking and Listening
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Provider:
Wyoming PBS
Date Added:
09/17/2019